4

READ THE QUESTION CAREFULLY, THIS IS A MAC APP, systemName is not available on mac os

I'm trying to build a simple application using swiftUI on macOS, however I'm having some trouble displaying some icons.

I have now read everywhere that you need to download the SF Symbols app and export the symbols yourself in order to use them, so I did that, then I added the exported symbol to the .xcassets and now I'm trying to create a button with an image, so here is the code:

import SwiftUI

struct ActionBar: View {

    var body: some View {
        HStack {
            Spacer()
            Button(action: {

            }) {
                Image("Plus")
                    .font(Font.system(size: 24, weight: .light))
                    .foregroundColor(Color.red)
                Text("Test")
            }
        }
        .frame(maxWidth: .infinity)
        .padding()
        .background(Color.init(red: 0.8, green: 0.8, blue: 0.8))
    }
}

struct ActionBar_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        ActionBar()
    }
}

I have tried many variations, for example:

Image(nsImage: NSImage(name: "Plus"))

but all the information out there, including apples own documentation only talk about UIImage which as far as I understood is part of UIKit which is the iOS version of the UI framework, has anybody gotten this to work on macOS?

Thanks a lot!

Edit: the asset was imported as a Image Symbol Set, Xcode doesn't throw any errors as I just took the svg generated by the SF Symbols app and put it directly on the assets.

Edit 2: I just run into this post which states SVG support is wonky... I tried converting the SVG into a PNG, but xcode does not accept pngs as Symbol sets... so, I guess this feature is just plain broken? which sucks...

1
  • It is documented by Apple that SF Symbols are not available for macOS officially. All you try to do is hacky - no guaranty that it should work.
    – Asperi
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:02

4 Answers 4

6

In MacOS, there are no systemImages available. But NSImage.Name prov ides the alternative option. This link show most of the MacOS system default icons.

This is an example of NSImage.Name :

Icon(NSImage.refreshTemplateName)

Following is the Icon view definition :

struct Icon: View {
    var image: NSImage.Name
    var body: some View {
        Image(nsImage: NSImage(named: image)!)
            .renderingMode(.original)
            .resizable()
            .scaledToFit()
    }
    init(_ image: NSImage.Name){
        self.image = image
    }
}

P.S. Image view does not have a modifier called .font(). Please check its documentation for proper syntax.

Edit: You can skip the extra view by following format.

Image(nsImage: NSImage(name: NSImage.addTemplateName))

The list of NSImage.Names are here

4
  • Well, it is related but not exactly what I'm looking for, but thanks, I might give it a try later, for now I just decided to use images for the icons, which is the more straightforward path Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 5:02
  • 1
    @Oscar I have added an edit. This is the most straight forward option that is build-in to xcode. Rest of the option are more work by importing images from other apps and link it manually.
    – NikzJon
    Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 10:47
  • That works perfectly, it doesn't quite answer my question, but it is the best option so far, thanks a lot!!! I wish I could select more than one right answer :) Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 16:12
  • Great! Exactly what I was searching for
    – John Smith
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 0:18
1

Here's my solution, but this is very much of a hack, and I don't know if Apple would approve it. So consider this answer for "educational purposes", I guess.

Concept

The main idea is to modify the SVG file exported by the SF Symbols app so that it only contains one instance of the selected symbol instead of the full template, and to use the SVGKit framework to display it, via an NSViewRepresentable object.

Export

Use the SF Symbols app on your Mac and select the symbol you want to use, then do "Export Custom Symbol Template".

Modify

Open the exported SVG file in a text editor, such as Sublime Text or CotEditor.

Delete everything in the file except the header and the "Symbols" field, which should only contain the symbol variation you want to use. Then change the size of the rendered canvas and also align the symbol properly.

For example, if you want to use the "Regular-L" version of the "plus" symbol, your final "plus.svg" file should be like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!--Generator: Apple Native CoreSVG 123-->
<!DOCTYPE svg
PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD SVG 1.1//EN"
       "http://www.w3.org/Graphics/SVG/1.1/DTD/svg11.dtd">
<svg version="1.1" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" width="128" height="128">
 <!--glyph: "uni10017C.medium", point size: 100.000000, font version: "Version 15.0d7e11", template writer version: "5"-->

 <g id="Symbols">
  <g id="Regular-L" transform="matrix(1 0 0 1 0 100)">
   <path d="M 67.4316 17.3828 C 70.0684 17.3828 72.2168 15.2832 72.2168 12.7441 L 72.2168 -30.3711 L 114.062 -30.3711 C 116.65 -30.3711 118.848 -32.5684 118.848 -35.1562 C 118.848 -37.793 116.65 -39.9414 114.062 -39.9414 L 72.2168 -39.9414 L 72.2168 -83.1055 C 72.2168 -85.6445 70.0684 -87.7441 67.4316 -87.7441 C 64.8438 -87.7441 62.6953 -85.6445 62.6953 -83.1055 L 62.6953 -39.9414 L 20.8496 -39.9414 C 18.2617 -39.9414 16.0645 -37.793 16.0645 -35.1562 C 16.0645 -32.5684 18.2617 -30.3711 20.8496 -30.3711 L 62.6953 -30.3711 L 62.6953 12.7441 C 62.6953 15.2832 64.8438 17.3828 67.4316 17.3828 Z"/>
  </g>
</g>
</svg>

To sum up:

  • Keep the header
  • Keep the id="Symbols" field
  • In the Symbols field, keep only one category, in my example id="Regular-L"
  • Change the size in the header, in my example width="128" height="128"
  • Align the symbol by changing the last two parameters of the transform field, in my example transform="matrix(1 0 0 1 0 100)" (x 0 and y 100)

Install SVGKit

Make a view

Add the modified plus.svg file to your project (not in the assets catalog, just in the project itself)

Make an NSViewRepresentable struct like this:

import SVGKit

struct IconView: NSViewRepresentable {

    let name: String

    func makeNSView(context: Context) -> SVGKFastImageView {
        let img = SVGKImage(named: name)!
        return SVGKFastImageView(svgkImage: img)!
    }

    func updateNSView(_ nsView: SVGKFastImageView, context: Context) {
        // not implemented
    }

}

Use the view

Then use it in your ContentView (give it a frame so that it doesn't fill up the whole window), for example:

struct ContentView: View {
    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            IconView(name: "plus")
                .frame(width: 200, height: 200, alignment: .center)
        }
        .frame(maxWidth: .infinity, maxHeight: .infinity)
    }
}
5
  • Thanks for the answer, it seems a lot of work for having a single image in the svg though, at that point I think it might make more sense to simple export the icon in a png and use it that way? wdyt? Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 11:38
  • It depends if you need to be able to resize the image. With my solution, the image is a vector svg, so it can be displayed at any size without creating artefacts or losing detail. If you use a png you can't resize it, you have to use it at the size defined by the png file.
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 11:40
  • well, if it is an image set it adjust to the device's resolution right? but in any case, it seems current support for this is non-existant, thanks a lot! Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 11:53
  • For example nuke1010's answer is good if you can use the template image without resizing it in your app, but as soon as you resize it it becomes pixelated. With the svg you can display at any size. But as you say there's no official support for svg anyway, and my answer is just hack to be able to use an SF Symbol, otherwise it's overkill indeed. :)
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 11:58
  • Please note that Xcode 12 has added support for SF Symbols in Mac apps running in macOS 11.
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Jun 23, 2020 at 12:25
1

you don't need to download or export the symbols yourself, just do this, and it will work in ios and mac catalyst as well as EDIT: macOS Monterey and also macOS 11:

import SwiftUI

struct ContentView: View {
var body: some View {
    HStack {
        Spacer()
        Button(action: {

        }) {
            Image(systemName: "plus")
                .font(Font.system(size: 24, weight: .light))
                .foregroundColor(Color.red)
            Text("Test")
        }
    }
    .frame(maxWidth: .infinity)
    .padding()
    .background(Color.init(red: 0.8, green: 0.8, blue: 0.8))
}
}
6
  • 2
    systemName is only available on iOS, this is a mac app Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:26
  • This works on macos, using the mac catalyst. In xcode tick the box Mac in Deployment Info. Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 13:28
  • I need mac os specific functionality so using catalyst is not an option for me I think, but thanks for the answer, I might give it a try later on Commented Apr 18, 2020 at 5:01
  • @workingdog can you be more specific?? I cannot find the box "Mac" in "Deployment Info"?
    – mobibob
    Commented Aug 8, 2021 at 16:18
  • I found this ... developer.apple.com/tutorials/mac-catalyst/…, but my project does not show all the OS options.
    – mobibob
    Commented Aug 8, 2021 at 16:25
1

2021, SwiftUI 2

sample on SF sybmols symbols library

import SwiftUI

@available(OSX 11.0, *)
public extension Text {
    static func sfSymbol( _ sysName: String) -> Text {
        return Text(Image(systemName: sysName))
    }
    
    /// You need to use .fixedSize() manually!!!!
    static func sfIcon( _ sysName: String, size: CGFloat) -> Text {
        return Text(Image(systemName: sysName))
            .font(.system(size: size))
    }
    
    
    static func sfSymbolAndText(sysName: String, text: String) -> Text {
        return Text("\(sysName.asSfSymbol())\(text)")
    }
}

@available(OSX 11.0, *)
public extension String {
    func asSfSymbol() -> Image {
        Image(systemName: self)
    }
}

usage:

Text.sfIcon("doc.on.doc.fill", size: 13)

Text.sfSymbol("doc.on.doc.fill")

to put SF symbol in the middle of the text:

Text("Start of the text \( "doc.on.doc.fill".asSfSymbol() ) end of the text"

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.