4

I have a series of nested ul and li elements, to create a sidebar nav system. When the user hovers over one of the li elements I want the entire width of the background to change (shown right), not just the inside of the container (shown left).

Different hover styles

The problem I'm having is that in order to make the entire width change, I need to remove the ul padding-left which then removes the indentation and 'nested' look of the list elements.

An example below shows the behaviour currently present, where the background-color does not change for the entire width. Preferably I wouldn't have to manually add in indentation for each element, as the nested padding works quite nicely as is, but am open to suggestions :D

* {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

nav {
  width: 100px;
  background-color: lightgrey;
}

li {
  list-style: none;
}

ul {
  padding-left: 10px;
}

a {
  color: black;
  text-decoration: none;
  padding: 5px;
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100%;
}

a:hover {
  background-color: grey;
  color: white;
}
<nav>
  <ul>
    <li><a href='#'>Home</a></li>
    <li><a href='#'>Work</a></li>
    <ul>
      <li><a href='#'>Piece 1</a></li>
      <li><a href='#'>Piece 2</a></li>
    </ul>
    <li><a href='#'>Contact</a></li>
  </ul>
 </nav>

My questions:

  1. How can I make the background of the entire width of the li update on hover, without removing the indentation for the nested list items.

  2. Why are the width: 100% li elements not overflowing outside the nav bar? Since I thought width: 100% meant their width was the same as their parent's widths, which surely as they are indented would mean they would extend beyond.

Thanks!

Post Answer Edit The accepted answer is definitely good, but the solution i ended up with was dynamically generating the navbar elements with JavaScript according to an object.

3
  • 1
    Your HTML is invalid -- <ul> can have <li> children only.
    – Kosh
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:25
  • @Kosh so should the netsed ul be inside another li tag in that case?
    – dwb
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:37
  • 1
    Correct, nested ul should be in li
    – Kosh
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

2

This solution works for any number of nested levels.

The trick is using CSS counter to pad levels.

* {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

nav {
  display: inline-block;
  background-color: lightgrey;
}

ul,
li {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  list-style: none;
}


li {
  counter-increment: section;
  counter-reset: section;
}

a:before {
  content: counters(section, '');
  opacity: 0
}

a {
  color: black;
  text-decoration: none;
  padding: 5px;
  display: block;
}

a:hover {
  background-color: grey;
  color: white;
}
<nav>
  <ul>
    <li><a href='#'>Home</a></li>
    <li><a href='#'>Work</a>
      <ul>
        <li><a href='#'>Piece 1</a></li>
        <li><a href='#'>Piece 2</a>
          <ul>
            <li><a href='#'>Piece 2.1</a></li>
            <li><a href='#'>Piece 2.2</a></li>
          </ul>
        </li>
      </ul>
    </li>
    <li><a href='#'>Contact</a></li>
  </ul>
</nav>

0

If you want the links to be the width of the list, you can remove the padding of the unordered list (ul). Put the padding on the links instead:

* {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}

nav {
  width: 100px;
  background-color: lightgrey;
}

li {
  list-style: none;
  width: 100%;
}

ul {
  padding-left: 0;
}

a {
  color: black;
  text-decoration: none;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  padding: 5px;
  width: 100%;
  padding-left: 15px;
  display: inline-block;
  width: 100%;
}

ul ul li a{
  padding-left: 25px;
}

a:hover {
  background-color: grey;
  color: white;
}
<nav>
    <ul>
      <li><a href='#'>Home</a></li>
      <li><a href='#'>Work</a></li>
      <ul>
        <li><a href='#'>Piece 1</a></li>
        <li><a href='#'>Piece 2</a></li>
      </ul>
      <li><a href='#'>Contact</a></li>
    </ul>
   </nav>

5
  • So, the only option would be to manually add padding to each new indentation level?
    – dwb
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:10
  • Well, if you don't have too many list levels, this can be a solution. Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:12
  • Brilliant! So would you be able to explain the second part of my question? Since I'm confused about the behaviour.
    – dwb
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:15
  • With the padding, the sizing of the element changes, padding means that you increase the indent in an element so the children of the element cannot have a 100% width Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:19
  • 1
    Your HTML is invalid -- <ul> can have <li> children only.
    – Kosh
    Commented Apr 17, 2020 at 16:25

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.