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Why can't I declare the sum variable inside the function and then return it? It requires me to create the variable outside of the main function.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int simpleArraySum(std::vector<int> ar);
//int sum;

int main() 
{
    std::vector<int> ar = { 1, 2, 3 };
    std::cout << simpleArraySum(ar);

}

int simpleArraySum(std::vector<int> ar) 
{
    int sum{};
    for (int i : ar) {
        sum += i;
    }
    return sum;
}
  • What exact error that you get? – Mahmood Darwish Apr 18 at 8:14
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    You need to initialize sum – Mat Apr 18 at 8:15
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    not related to your question, but you’d better assign your sum variable an initial value inside a func, e.g. int sum=0; – Olha Apr 18 at 8:17
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    In C++, there is nothing wrong with declaring a variable inside a function, doing calculations with it, and then returning its value. However, a variable of type int in a function is uninitialised by default (unless you explicitly initialise it), whereas a similar variable at file scope (outside a function) is initialised to zero. To do sum += i the behaviour is undefined if sum is uninitialised - so some compilers will issue warnings about that. That doesn't mean using a local variable is wrong - it means you need to explicitly initialise it before first usage. – Peter Apr 18 at 8:20
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    Thanks @RayToal . It WAS an edited question and I deleted the comments to hopefully keep it clear. Learning how to ask questions is a skill I'm trying to strengthen so I really appreciate the feedback. :) – guY Apr 19 at 16:37
1

Why can't I declare the sum variable inside the function and then return it?

You can, of course. The problem is when you declare sum in the function you didn't initialize it explicitly, then it's default initialized to indeterminate value, any use of it leads to UB.

Default initialization of non-class variables with automatic and dynamic storage duration produces objects with indeterminate values (static and thread-local objects get zero initialized)

You should initialize it like

int simpleArraySum(const std::vector<int>& ar) // better to pass-by-reference to avoid copy of the vector 
{
    int sum = 0; // copy-initialize to 0
    for (int i : ar) {
        sum += i;
    }
    return sum;
}

On the other hand, if you declare it as global variable, it'll be zero-initialized firstly, even though you don't initialize it explicitly.

1) For every named variable with static or thread-local storage duration that is not subject to constant initialization (since C++14), before any other initialization.

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  • Yes this is correct. Now it leads me to another question...why does it have to be initialized in the function but not outside of main? – guY Apr 18 at 8:21
  • @guY See the latter part of my answer. – songyuanyao Apr 18 at 8:23
  • @guY - because a variable "outside of `main()" is initialised, and one in side the function is not. That's what the standard requires. The reason is that a variable at file scope only needs to be initialised once (before first usage) which is inexpensive. Whereas a variable local to a function has automatic storage duration, so is recreated every time the function is called (and ceases to exist when the function returns). Initialising it every time the function is called is more expensive - and often not necessary in practice if the variable is subsequently assigned a value. – Peter Apr 18 at 8:25
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One problem that I see in this program is that you have to include iostream.

After that the program will compile but will give a wrong answer because when defining a variable inside a function it takes a random value.

So, sum has a random number inside it which can be other than zero. That why it returns a strange number.

If you define a variable out side of function it takes zero as a default value that's why if you define sum outside everything it will work.

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0

As in the comments: In C++, there is nothing wrong with declaring a variable inside a function, doing calculations with it, and then returning its value. However, a variable of type int in a function is uninitialised by default (unless you explicitly initialise it), whereas a similar variable at file scope (outside a function) is initialised to zero. To do sum += i the behaviour is undefined if sum is uninitialised - so some compilers will issue warnings about that. That doesn't mean using a local variable is wrong - it means you need to explicitly initialise it before first usage. – Peter 1 min ago

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0

Yes u can declare the variable inside a function and return it. It won't give any error but will return a garbage(in some compilers). to prevent this initialize sum=0; use this

int simpleArraySum(std::vector<int> ar) 
{

    int sum=0;
    for (int i : ar) {
        sum += i;
    }
    return sum;
}
| improve this answer | |

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