3

I was trying to remove duplicates from a list using the following code:

a = [1,2,3,4,2,6,1,1,5,2]
res = []
[res.append(i) for i in a if i not in res]

But I would like to do this without defining the list I want as an empty list (ie, omit the line res = []) like:

a = [1,2,3,4,2,6,1,1,5,2]
#Either:
res = [i for i in a if i not in res]
#Or:
[i for i in a if i not in 'this list'] # this list is not a string. I meant it as the list being comprehensed

I want to avoid library imports and set()

13
  • I believe you cannot do that, use set(a) to remove duplicates, one-line and simple also. If order matters use a dictionary or an OrderedDict, depending on you Python's version, but this will be hacky. Apr 18 '20 at 13:42
  • I do not intent to use set or imported libraries :)
    – Joshua
    Apr 18 '20 at 13:42
  • 1
    Not everything with lists is a natural candidate for a comprehension. Also, why use a quadratic algorithm? Apr 18 '20 at 13:42
  • 5
    This problem sounds artificial. There are many (and more efficient) ways of achieving what you want.
    – rdas
    Apr 18 '20 at 13:45
  • 2
    Using set do not import any library Apr 18 '20 at 13:46
6

I think may work for you. It removes duplicates from the list while keeping the order.

newlist=[i for n,i in enumerate(L) if i not in L[:n]]
1
  • Very nice, using enumerate as the generator and check the list slice seen so far.
    – ThomasH
    Apr 18 '20 at 17:10
5

For Python3.6+, you can use dict.fromkeys():

>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 6, 1, 1, 5, 2]
>>> list(dict.fromkeys(a))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 5]

From the docs:

Create a new dictionary with keys from iterable and values set to value.

If you are using a lower Python version, you will need to use collections.OrderedDict to maintain order:

>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 6, 1, 1, 5, 2]
>>> list(OrderedDict.fromkeys(a))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 5]
0
4

here is a simple benchmark with the proposed solutions,

enter image description here

it shows that dict.fromkeys will perform the best

from simple_benchmark import BenchmarkBuilder
import random


b = BenchmarkBuilder()

@b.add_function()
def AmitDavidson(a):
    return [i for n,i in enumerate(a) if i not in a[:n]]

@b.add_function()
def RoadRunner(a):
    return list(dict.fromkeys(a))

@b.add_function()
def DaniMesejo(a):
    return  list({k: '' for k in a})


@b.add_function()
def rdas(a):
    return  sorted(list(set(a)), key=lambda x: a.index(x))


@b.add_function()
def unwanted_set(a):
    return  list(set(a))


@b.add_arguments('List lenght')
def argument_provider():
    for exp in range(2, 18):
        size = 2**exp
        yield size, [random.randint(0, 10) for _ in range(size)]

r = b.run()
r.plot()
3
  • 2
    Ah nice. I was going to post something similar, but this is better. +1
    – RoadRunner
    Apr 18 '20 at 15:08
  • this is awesomeness :) +1
    – Joshua
    Apr 18 '20 at 15:53
  • stackoverflow should auto-create these graphs
    – Joshua
    Apr 18 '20 at 15:54
3

Here is a solution using set that does preserve the order:

a = [1,2,3,4,2,6,1,1,5,2]
a_uniq = sorted(list(set(a)), key=lambda x: a.index(x))
print(a_uniq)
2
  • The main motivation for using set (beyond its concision) is to depulicate in sub-quadratic time but this use of index bumps it back up to quadratic. Apr 18 '20 at 13:50
  • So does the OPs comprehensions
    – rdas
    Apr 18 '20 at 13:51
2

One-liner, comprehension, O(n), that preserves order in Python 3.6+:

a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 6, 1, 1, 5, 2]

res = list({k: '' for k in a})
print(res)
0

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