9

I have a list like this:

list_1 = [np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, np.NaN, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, 0, 1, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN,  1, np.NaN]

So there are intervals that begin with 1 and end with 0. How can I replace the values in those intervals, say with 1? The outcome will look like this:

list_2 = [np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, np.NaN, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN]

I use NaN in this example, but a generalized solution that can apply to any value will also be great

1
  • is a 1 necessarily followed by 0? or can there be other 1s in between consecutive 1-0 pair? In other words, is there a 0 following every 1? – Ehsan Apr 18 '20 at 16:54
5

Pandas solution:

s = pd.Series(list_1)
s1 = s.eq(1)
s0 = s.eq(0)
m = (s1 | s0).where(s1.cumsum().ge(1),False).cumsum().mod(2).eq(1)
s.loc[m & s.isna()] = 1
print(s.tolist())
#[nan, nan, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, nan, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0, 1.0, 0.0, nan, 1.0, 1.0]

but if there is only 1, 0 or NaN you can do:

s = pd.Series(list_1)
s.fillna(s.ffill().where(lambda x: x.eq(1))).tolist()

output

[nan,
 nan,
 1.0,
 1.0,
 1.0,
 1.0,
 0.0,
 nan,
 1.0,
 1.0,
 0.0,
 1.0,
 1.0,
 0.0,
 nan,
 1.0,
 1.0]
4

Here's a numpy based approach using np.cumsum:

a = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, np.NaN, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN, 
              1, np.NaN, 0, 1, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN,  1, np.NaN])

ix0 = (a == 0).cumsum()
ix1 = (a == 1).cumsum()
dec = (ix1 - ix0).astype(float)
# Only necessary if the seq can end with an unclosed interval
ix = len(a)-(a[::-1]==1).argmax()
last = ix1[-1]-ix0[-1]
if last > 0:
    dec[ix:] = a[ix:]
# -----
out = np.where(dec==1, dec, a)

print(out)
array([nan, nan,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0., nan,  1.,  1.,  0.,  1.,  1.,
        0., nan,  1., nan])
3

Here's a NumPy based one -

def fill_inbetween(a):
    m1 = a==1
    m2 = a==0
    id_ar = m1.astype(int)-m2
    idc = id_ar.cumsum()
    idc[len(m1)-m1[::-1].argmax():] =  0
    return np.where(idc.astype(bool), 1, a)

Sample run -

In [44]: a # input as array
Out[44]: 
array([nan, nan,  1., nan, nan, nan,  0., nan,  1., nan,  0.,  1., nan,
        0., nan,  1., nan])

In [45]: fill_inbetween(a)
Out[45]: 
array([nan, nan,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0., nan,  1.,  1.,  0.,  1.,  1.,
        0., nan,  1., nan])

Benchmarking on NumPy solutions with array input

To keep things simple, we will just scaled up the given sample to 10,000x by tiling and test out the NumPy based ones.

Other NumPy solutions -

#@yatu's soln
def func_yatu(a):
    ix0 = (a == 0).cumsum()
    ix1 = (a == 1).cumsum()
    dec = (ix1 - ix0).astype(float)
    ix = len(a)-(a[::-1]==1).argmax()
    last = ix1[-1]-ix0[-1]
    if last > 0:
        dec[ix:] = a[ix:]
    out = np.where(dec==1, dec, a)
    return out

# @FBruzzesi's soln (with the output returned in a separate array)
def func_FBruzzesi(a, value=1):
    ones = np.squeeze(np.argwhere(a==1))
    zeros = np.squeeze(np.argwhere(a==0))   
    if ones[0]>zeros[0]:
        zeros = zeros[1:]   
    out = a.copy()
    for i,j in zip(ones,zeros):
        out[i+1:j] = value
    return out

# @Ehsan's soln (with the output returned in a separate array)
def func_Ehsan(list_1):
    zeros_ind = np.where(list_1 == 0)[0]
    ones_ind = np.where(list_1 == 1)[0]
    ones_ind = ones_ind[:zeros_ind.size]        
    indexer = np.r_[tuple([np.s_[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(ones_ind,zeros_ind)])]
    out = list_1.copy()
    out[indexer] = 1
    return out

Timings -

In [48]: list_1 = [np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, np.NaN, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, 0, 1, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN,  1, np.NaN]
    ...: a = np.array(list_1)

In [49]: a = np.tile(a,10000)

In [50]: %timeit func_Ehsan(a)
    ...: %timeit func_FBruzzesi(a)
    ...: %timeit func_yatu(a)
    ...: %timeit fill_inbetween(a)
4.86 s ± 325 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
253 ms ± 29.4 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)
3.39 ms ± 205 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)
2.01 ms ± 168 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100 loops each)

The copying process doesn't take much of runtime, so that can be ignored -

In [51]: %timeit a.copy()
78.3 µs ± 571 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
2

Assuming each 1 is followed by 0 (minus last 1):

list_1 = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, np.NaN, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, 0, 1, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN,  1, np.NaN])
zeros_ind = np.where(list_1 == 0)[0]
ones_ind = np.where(list_1 == 1)[0]
ones_ind = ones_ind[:zeros_ind.size]

#create a concatenated list of ranges of indices you desire to slice
indexer = np.r_[tuple([np.s_[i:j] for (i,j) in zip(ones_ind,zeros_ind)])]
#slice using numpy indexing
list_1[indexer] = 1

Output:

[nan nan  1.  1.  1.  1.  0. nan  1.  1.  0.  1.  1.  0. nan  1. nan]
2

Here's a code where a variable replace will determine if the element should be replace or not and for will iterate from 0 to len of the interval and if it finds 1 then replace will true then elements will be replaced and when it will find next 0 replace will be falls and element will not replace till again appearing of 1

  replace = False
    for i in (len(interval)-1):
        if interval[i]==1:
            replace = True
        elif interval[i]==0:
            replace = False
        if replace:
            list[i]=inerval[i]
1
  • Please don't post only code as an answer, but also provide an explanation what your code does and how it solves the problem of the question. Answers with an explanation are usually of higher quality, and are more likely to attract upvotes. – Mark Rotteveel Apr 19 '20 at 9:51
1

You can retrieve indices one ones and zeros using np.argwhere and then fill the values among each slice:

import numpy as np

a = np.array([np.NaN, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, np.NaN, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN, 1, np.NaN, 0, 1, np.NaN, 0, np.NaN,  1, np.NaN])

ones = np.squeeze(np.argwhere(a==1))
zeros = np.squeeze(np.argwhere(a==0))

if ones[0]>zeros[0]:
    zeros = zeros[1:]

value = -999
for i,j in zip(ones,zeros):
    a[i+1:j] = value

a
array([  nan,   nan,    1., -999., -999., -999.,    0.,   nan,    1.,
       -999.,    0.,    1., -999.,    0.,   nan,    1.,   nan])

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