21
  1. First, Is it possible to find out what is the monitor frame/refresh rate in javascript (60Hz for most LCD monitors)?
  2. Second, is there any way to say execute a function after every X frames?

Several people asked why I need this. Here is the context: I have an animation (an endless loop that renders one frame after another). The output of each iteration needs to be synchronized with monitor refresh rate, otherwise tearing will happen. The way I am doing it right now is to use setTimeout(loop, 16) within the loop method. Its sort of working. The second parameter needs to be 1/(refresh rate), and that is why I asked this question.

3
  • Perhaps by using Native Client along with JavaScript?
    – Shaz
    May 25, 2011 at 21:23
  • i can't imagine a situation where you want to be executing a callback on frame refresh... What function do you want to call 60 times a sec? You have to be calling SOMETHING to count up to X frames after all (assuming you could get this information in the first place that is.
    – colinross
    May 25, 2011 at 21:23
  • 4
    @colinross games often sync to frame refresh
    – Alnitak
    May 27, 2011 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

26

You may have some luck on modern browsers using window.requestAnimationFrame with a trivial callback that measures the time between successive invocations and from that calculate the FPS.

You should also be able to easily skip your render function every nth invocation to reduce the desired frame rate.

I put a rough example at http://jsfiddle.net/rBGPk/ - the math may be slightly wrong but it should be enough to show the general idea.

1
  • @Alnitak Thanks for this really helpful reply (again). I adapted your fiddle to calculate the long-run distance between two animation frames instead, so that we can use it as a smallest multiple for the desired presentation times in our studies jsfiddle.net/bn8kbw3t
    – Ruben
    Nov 17, 2014 at 13:54
13

The solution below works by measuring the number of milliseconds between two consecutive animation frames.

Warning: It often returns an incorrect FPS because sometimes an animation frame is skipped when your CPU is busy with other tasks.

// Function that returns a Promise for the FPS
const getFPS = () =>
  new Promise(resolve =>
    requestAnimationFrame(t1 =>
      requestAnimationFrame(t2 => resolve(1000 / (t2 - t1)))
    )
  )

// Calling the function to get the FPS
getFPS().then(fps => console.log(fps));

Tips

3

Calculate time interval between repaint:

const getRepaintInterval = () => {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    requestAnimationFrame((t1) => {
      requestAnimationFrame((t2) => {
        resolve(t2 - t1);
      });
    });
  });
};

Or calculate FPS in the selected second:

const getFps = () => new Promise(resolve => {
    let repaint = 0;
    const start = performance.now();
    const withRepaint = () => {
        requestAnimationFrame(() => {
            if ((performance.now() - start) < 1000) {
                repaint += 1;
                withRepaint();
            } else {
                resolve(repaint);
            }
        });
    };
    withRepaint();
});

Or calculate FPS with start and end:

const fpsHandler = () => {
    let repaint;
    let stop;
    let ret;
    let start;
    const init = () => {
        ret = undefined;
        stop = false;
        repaint = 0;
        start = performance.now();
    };
    init();
    const withRepaint = () => {
        requestAnimationFrame(() => {
            if (!stop) {
                repaint += 1;
                withRepaint();
            }
        });
    };
    return {
        start: () => {
            init();
            withRepaint();
        },
        end: () => {
            stop = true;
            if (!ret) ret = repaint / ((performance.now() - start) / 1000);
            return ret;
        }
    }
};

const { start, end } = fpsHandler();
1

This is robust method, using the requestAnimationFrame method.

function calcFPS(opts){
    var requestFrame = window.requestAnimationFrame ||
        window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame ||
        window.mozRequestAnimationFrame;
    if (!requestFrame) return true; // Check if "true" is returned; 
                                    // pick default FPS, show error, etc...
    function checker(){
        if (index--) requestFrame(checker);
        else {
            // var result = 3*Math.round(count*1000/3/(performance.now()-start));
            var result = count*1000/(performance.now()- start);
            if (typeof opts.callback === "function") opts.callback(result);
            console.log("Calculated: "+result+" frames per second");
        }
    }
    if (!opts) opts = {};
    var count = opts.count||60, index = count, start = performance.now();
    checker();
}

The higher the value of count, the more accurate the value of the FPS, and the longer the FPS test will take.

Additional logic can be used to round to 15/12s, ie 24, 30, 48, 60 120... FPS.


Here's the compiled version (with rounding to 3 FPS):

function calcFPS(a){function b(){if(f--)c(b);else{var e=3*Math.round(1E3*d/3/(performance.now()-g));"function"===typeof a.callback&&a.callback(e);console.log("Calculated: "+e+" frames per second")}}var c=window.requestAnimationFrame||window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame||window.mozRequestAnimationFrame;if(!c)return!0;a||(a={});var d=a.count||60,f=d,g=performance.now();b()}

Used like so:

calcFPS(); // Only logs to console (you can remove the console log,
           // making this call redundant)

calcFPS({count: 30}); // Manually set count (the test should take 500ms
                      // on a 60FPS monitor

calcFPS({callback: useFPS}); // Specify a callback so you can use the
                             // FPS number value

var FPS = 0, err = calcFPS({count: 120, callback: fps => FPS = fps});
if (err) FPS = 30; 
1

As per some of the previous answer that explain to use requestAnimationFrame and measure the time difference between frames, here is a solution that uses requestAnimationFrame and the timestamp already sent to the callback. There is otherwise no reason to run a separate performance.now() function.

var previousTimestamp, divInterval, divFPS;

const raf = window.requestAnimationFrame || window.mozRequestAnimationFrame ||
    window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame || window.msRequestAnimationFrame;

const rafLoop = timestamp => {
    let interval = timestamp - previousTimestamp;
    let fps = 1000 / interval;
    divInterval.innerHTML = `Interval: ${interval}`;
    divFPS.innerHTML = `FPS: ${fps}`;
    previousTimestamp = timestamp;
    raf(rafLoop);
};

divInterval = document.getElementById('interval');
divFPS = document.getElementById('fps');

// This is run first to set the previousTimestamp variable with an initial value, and then call the rafLoop function.
raf(timestamp => {
    previousTimestamp = timestamp;
    raf(rafLoop);
});
<div id="interval"></div>
<div id="fps"></div>

See also https://codepen.io/sassano/pen/wvgxxMp for another sample with animation from which this snippet was derived.

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