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I'm using cocos 3.17 on Xcode 11 on Mac. These are my fragment and vertex shaders.

myShader.frag

#ifdef GL_ES
precision lowp float;
#define LOWP lowp
#else
#define LOWP
#endif

uniform sampler2D u_texture;
varying LOWP vec4 v_fragmentColor;
uniform mat4 u_rotation;

void main()
{
  mat4 t1= mat4(1);
  mat4 t2= mat4(1);
  t1[3] = vec4(-0.5,-0.5,1,1);
  t2[3] = vec4(+0.5,+0.5,1,1);
  vec2 pos = (t2 * u_rotation * t1 * vec4(gl_PointCoord, 0, 1)).xy;
  gl_FragColor  =  v_fragmentColor * texture2D(u_texture, pos);
}

myShader.vert

#ifdef GL_ES
#define LOWP lowp
#else
#define LOWP
#endif

attribute vec4 a_position;
uniform float u_pointSize;
uniform LOWP vec4 u_fragmentColor;
varying LOWP vec4 v_fragmentColor;

void main() 
{
  gl_Position     = CC_MVPMatrix * a_position;
  gl_PointSize    = u_pointSize;
  v_fragmentColor = u_fragmentColor;
}

When I run it as a Mac app, it gives me this error:

cocos2d:
ERROR: 0:36: Use of undeclared identifier 'gl_PointCoord'
ERROR: 0:37: Use of undeclared identifier 'pos'

someone can help me to figure out why?

  • I'd be really wary of tossing around integers like 0 and 1 in un-#version'd GLSL hoping that they will automatically be cast to float. – genpfault Apr 20 at 13:46
  • 1
    Also, make sure you didn't swap your vert/frag sources by accident, gl_PointCoord is a frag-only built-in variable. – genpfault Apr 20 at 13:47
  • 1
    Yes, You're right, I swapped the sources. I discovered that the #version 120 directive was missing, if I add it to the beginning of the shader, it gives me an error but because the cocos add empty macros in the initialization. I must pass it as compileTimeHeaders when i call compileShader, I must pass it as compileTimeHeaders when i call compileShader, although I don't know exactly how to do it – redYmir Apr 20 at 14:26
  • I've just investigated the cocs2d-x api (GLProgram and GLProgramState). Sadly I didn't find any relevant information. I seems that cocos2d-x was designed for OpenGL ES 2.0 and cannot deal newer GLSL versions. – Rabbid76 Apr 20 at 16:17
0

After some troubles, I found the solution. A GLSL shader that does not have a #version directive at the top is assumed to be 1.10, but I really need version 1.2. So, I need to add '#version 120\n' as a compileTimeHeader string in the initialization:

GLProgram *program = new GLProgram();
program->initWithByteArrays(myShader_vert, myShader_frag, "#version 120\n", "");

There is a mistake in the OpenGL docs which state that gl_PointCoord is a 1.1 feature, whereas in fact it was introduced in 1.2.

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