854

I would like to format my numbers to always display 2 decimal places, rounding where applicable.

Examples:

number     display
------     -------
1          1.00
1.341      1.34
1.345      1.35

I have been using this:

parseFloat(num).toFixed(2);

But it's displaying 1 as 1, rather than 1.00.

31 Answers 31

1220
(Math.round(num * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

Live Demo

var num1 = "1";
document.getElementById('num1').innerHTML = (Math.round(num1 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num2 = "1.341";
document.getElementById('num2').innerHTML = (Math.round(num2 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num3 = "1.345";
document.getElementById('num3').innerHTML = (Math.round(num3 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);
span {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    margin: 5px;
    padding: 5px;
}
<span id="num1"></span>
<span id="num2"></span>
<span id="num3"></span>

Note that it will round to 2 decimal places, so the input 1.346 will return 1.35.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    @Kooilnc: OP wants 1 to display as 1.00, and 1.341 to display as 1.34. – drudge May 26 '11 at 16:59
  • 56
    No need to use round() since toFixed() rounds it. – Milan Babuškov Dec 14 '13 at 21:24
  • 32
    toFixed() does round it but don't forget it's returning a string...So this method is really only useful for display. If you want to perform further mathematical computations on the rounded value do not use toFixed(). – TWright Oct 15 '15 at 7:19
  • 9
    according to MDN, Math.round will not always give accurate results due to rounding errors. I tested this with 1.005, which should round to 1.01, but it gives 1.00. Use my answer for consistent accuracy: stackoverflow.com/a/34796988/3549440. – Nate Jan 14 '16 at 18:39
  • 15
    This entire answer could be reduced to (+num).toFixed(2). It even retains the rounding bug in the original, see Nate's answer. – RobG Aug 15 '17 at 4:01
349
Number(1).toFixed(2);         // 1.00
Number(1.341).toFixed(2);     // 1.34
Number(1.345).toFixed(2);     // 1.34 NOTE: See andy's comment below.
Number(1.3450001).toFixed(2); // 1.35

document.getElementById('line1').innerHTML = Number(1).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line2').innerHTML = Number(1.341).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line3').innerHTML = Number(1.345).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById('line4').innerHTML = Number(1.3450001).toFixed(2);
<span id="line1"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line2"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line3"></span>
<br/>
<span id="line4"></span>

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Last line is false. I tried this in Chrome console and ``Number(1.365).toFixed(2) returns "1.37" – Andre Jul 16 '13 at 14:37
  • 1
    @Andre, Chrome 29.0.1547.57 gives me 1.34 for expression Number(1.345).toFixed(2). – Drew Noakes Aug 22 '13 at 22:29
  • 1
    toFixed does do rounding, which you can see on almost every test number. – andy Nov 8 '13 at 18:55
  • 44
    Accidentally submitted that last comment before finishing.. 1.345 is an example of a number that can't be stored exactly in floating point, so I think the reason that it doesn't round as you expect, is that it's actually stored as a number slightly less than 1.345 and it rounds down. If you test instead with (1.34500001).toFixed(2) then you see it correctly rounds up to 1.35 – andy Nov 8 '13 at 19:02
105

This answer will fail if value = 1.005.

As a better solution, the rounding problem can be avoided by using numbers represented in exponential notation:

Number(Math.round(1.005+'e2')+'e-2'); // 1.01

Cleaner code as suggested by @Kon, and the original author:

Number(Math.round(parseFloat(value + 'e' + decimalPlaces)) + 'e-' + decimalPlaces)

You may add toFixed() at the end to retain the decimal point e.g: 1.00 but note that it will return as string.

Number(Math.round(parseFloat(value + 'e' + decimalPlaces)) + 'e-' + decimalPlaces).toFixed(decimalPlaces)

Credit: Rounding Decimals in JavaScript

| improve this answer | |
  • 15
    Amazingly, everyone else in here failed to see that toFixed has that rounding problem. Your answer should be the accepted one. – Armfoot Sep 25 '15 at 10:46
  • 1
    Just tested to see if this was still the case. you are still correct for Chrome Version 59.0.3071.115 Your solution will round up for 1.005 (1.01) and round down for 1.00499999 (1.00) – Artistan Jul 19 '17 at 13:26
  • jsfiddle.net/Artistan/qq895bnp/28 there are "times" when toFixed will work, but it is quite inconsistent. :) – Artistan Jul 19 '17 at 17:06
  • surround Number in parseFloat is its returning string – user889030 Sep 26 '17 at 13:55
  • 1
    This is a solid answer. A couple of improvements I can think of: (1) VS Code (TypeScript file) doesn't like Math.round() passing in a string. (2) Make number of decimal places dynamic (not hard-coded to 2). (3) toFixed() seems unnecessary. So what I came up with is Number(Math.round(parseFloat(value + 'e' + decimalPlaces)) + 'e-' + decimalPlaces) – Kon Apr 25 '19 at 19:12
30

For modern browsers, use toLocaleString:

var num = 1.345;
num.toLocaleString(undefined, { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

Specify a locale tag as first parameter to control the decimal separator. For a dot, use for example English U.S. locale:

num.toLocaleString("en-US", { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

which gives:

1.35

Most countries in Europe use a comma as decimal separator, so if you for example use Swedish/Sweden locale:

num.toLocaleString("sv-SE", { maximumFractionDigits: 2, minimumFractionDigits: 2 });

it will give:

1,35

| improve this answer | |
  • Not sure why this is downvoted, it seemed to work well for me. Please add a comment if you intend to downvote if something is wrong with this! – John Culviner Jun 10 '19 at 16:02
23
var num = new Number(14.12);
console.log(num.toPrecision(2));//outputs 14
console.log(num.toPrecision(3));//outputs 14.1
console.log(num.toPrecision(4));//outputs 14.12
console.log(num.toPrecision(5));//outputs 14.120
| improve this answer | |
  • That gives unexpected results, if your number can be 1.4, and 23.654, and 0, what precision would you take? – shinzou Oct 15 '16 at 15:36
  • 2
    Note the OP is asking for "rounding where applicable". toPrecision only formats the number to a specific number of decimal places, simply leaving out redundant places, but not rounding them. This could be very useful too of course, but it's important to understand the difference. – Boaz Nov 9 '16 at 11:40
  • 1
    Actually toPrecision does round, according to Mozilla. Test: (20.55).toPrecision(3) "20.6" – James L. Nov 27 '17 at 17:20
  • 2
    If you want to strip trailing zeros, cast it to a Number or Float after using toFixed: const formattedVal = Number(val.toFixed(2)); Do not use toPrecision, as it counts the non-decimal numbers when using the precision param. – James L. Nov 27 '17 at 17:26
19

For the most accurate rounding, create this function:

function round(value, decimals) {
    return Number(Math.round(value +'e'+ decimals) +'e-'+ decimals).toFixed(decimals);
}

and use it to round to 2 decimal places:

console.log("seeked to " + round(1.005, 2));
> 1.01

Thanks to Razu, this article, and MDN's Math.round reference.

| improve this answer | |
13

A much more generic solution for rounding to N places

function roundN(num,n){
  return parseFloat(Math.round(num * Math.pow(10, n)) /Math.pow(10,n)).toFixed(n);
}


console.log(roundN(1,2))
console.log(roundN(1.34,2))
console.log(roundN(1.35,2))
console.log(roundN(1.344,2))
console.log(roundN(1.345,2))
console.log(roundN(1.344,3))
console.log(roundN(1.345,3))
console.log(roundN(1.3444,3))
console.log(roundN(1.3455,3))

Output

1.00
1.34
1.35
1.34
1.35
1.344
1.345
1.344
1.346
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This alswer fails with certain numbers close to 0, roundN(-3.4028230607370965e+38,2) returns "-3.4028230607370965e+38" instead of the expected 0.00 – Ferrybig Apr 17 '19 at 9:38
  • interesting @Ferrybig i ll test the numbers you mentioned and think of a workaround, thanks for testing – PirateApp Apr 17 '19 at 11:03
  • 1
    Note that the before mentioned number should not show zero, but a huge number instead, this was just an error in my brain. But it still doesn't work, since it still doesn't show 2 decimals – Ferrybig Apr 17 '19 at 11:51
12

Simplest answer:

var num = 1.2353453;
num.toFixed(2); // 1.24

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/E2XU7/

| improve this answer | |
  • 12
    Well, toFixed was already suggested in stackoverflow.com/a/13292833/218196. What additional information does your question provide? – Felix Kling Apr 8 '13 at 18:42
  • that answer does not include round functionality, my answer includes tho. – macio.Jun Apr 9 '13 at 20:00
  • 8
    Uh? It's exactly the same answer. Calling toFixed on a number. – Felix Kling Apr 9 '13 at 20:19
  • 1
    Correct, same function, but the result of that answer is misleading, I just rectified it by expressing the round functionality. – macio.Jun Apr 10 '13 at 2:28
  • The question states : "...rounding where applicable". Your answer does not involve rounding. – Chris Jun 20 '13 at 8:40
10
var number = 123456.789;


console.log(new Intl.NumberFormat('en-IN', { maximumFractionDigits: 2 }).format(number));

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/NumberFormat

| improve this answer | |
9

If you're already using jQuery, you could look at using the jQuery Number Format plugin.

The plugin can return formatted numbers as a string, you can set decimal, and thousands separators, and you can choose the number of decimals to show.

$.number( 123, 2 ); // Returns '123.00'

You can also get jQuery Number Format from GitHub.

| improve this answer | |
  • 11
    It is overkill to use a plugin "just to have fixed length decimal part". – Lashae Sep 4 '13 at 14:04
  • 9
    @Lashae, sure, if thats all you want to do. I posted this in case the OP or anyone else wanted the extra functionality that the plugin provides as well. – Sam Sehnert Sep 9 '13 at 1:31
  • if the poster of the question had added the jQuery tag of course ;) – fullstacklife Mar 30 '15 at 0:56
8

Is this what you mean?

function showAsFloat(num, n){
      return !isNaN(+num) ? (+num).toFixed(n || 2) : num;
}

document.querySelector('#result').textContent = 
    [
     'command                      | result',
     '-----------------------------------------------',
     'showAsFloat(1);              | ' + showAsFloat(1),
     'showAsFloat(1.314);          | ' + showAsFloat(1.314),
     'showAsFloat(\'notanumber\')    | ' + showAsFloat('notanumber'),
     'showAsFloat(\'23.44567\', 3)   | ' + showAsFloat('23.44567', 3),
     'showAsFloat(2456198, 5)      | ' + showAsFloat('2456198', 5),
     'showAsFloat(0);              | ' + showAsFloat(0)
    ].join('\n');
<pre id="result"></pre>

| improve this answer | |
6

Convert a number into a string, keeping only two decimals:

var num = 5.56789;
var n = num.toFixed(2);

The result of n will be:

5.57
| improve this answer | |
5

Just run into this one of longest thread, below is my solution:

parseFloat(Math.round((parseFloat(num * 100)).toFixed(2)) / 100 ).toFixed(2)

Let me know if anyone can poke a hole

| improve this answer | |
4

Are you looking for floor?

var num = 1.42482;
var num2 = 1;
var fnum = Math.floor(num).toFixed(2);
var fnum2 = Math.floor(num2).toFixed(2);
alert(fnum + " and " + fnum2); //both values will be 1.00
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I don't think he wants to round down to the nearest integer. – drudge May 26 '11 at 5:29
  • yeah, I wasn't sure from the description, but I was just throwing it out there incase – samwise May 26 '11 at 5:29
4
function currencyFormat (num) {
    return "$" + num.toFixed(2).replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, "$1,")
}

console.info(currencyFormat(2665));   // $2,665.00
console.info(currencyFormat(102665)); // $102,665.00
| improve this answer | |
3

Here's also a generic function that can format to any number of decimal places:

function numberFormat(val, decimalPlaces) {

    var multiplier = Math.pow(10, decimalPlaces);
    return (Math.round(val * multiplier) / multiplier).toFixed(decimalPlaces);
}
| improve this answer | |
3

Where specific formatting is required, you should write your own routine or use a library function that does what you need. The basic ECMAScript functionality is usually insufficient for displaying formatted numbers.

A thorough explanation of rounding and formatting is here: http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-round.htm#RiJ

As a general rule, rounding and formatting should only be peformed as a last step before output. Doing so earlier may introduce unexpectedly large errors and destroy the formatting.

| improve this answer | |
  • There are times when I shake my head at my own choice to get so deeply involved of late in this whole JS/Ecma platform. :( "Where specific formatting is required, you should write your own routine or use a library function that does what you need. The basic ECMAScript functionality is usually insufficient for displaying formatted numbers." What an asinine statement - not that you made it, but because that fact exists. Just sad. Get on the ball, Javascript! :) – ChrisH Dec 21 '17 at 1:41
2

function number_format(string,decimals=2,decimal=',',thousands='.',pre='R$ ',pos=' Reais'){
  var numbers = string.toString().match(/\d+/g).join([]);
  numbers = numbers.padStart(decimals+1, "0");
  var splitNumbers = numbers.split("").reverse();
  var mask = '';
  splitNumbers.forEach(function(d,i){
    if (i == decimals) { mask = decimal + mask; }
    if (i>(decimals+1) && ((i-2)%(decimals+1))==0) { mask = thousands + mask; }
    mask = d + mask;
  });
  return pre + mask + pos;
}
var element = document.getElementById("format");
var money= number_format("10987654321",2,',','.');
element.innerHTML = money;
#format{
display:inline-block;
padding:10px;
border:1px solid #ddd;
background:#f5f5f5;
}
<div id='format'>Test 123456789</div>

| improve this answer | |
1

You are not giving us the whole picture.

javascript:alert(parseFloat(1).toFixed(2)) shows 1.00 in my browsers when I paste it int0 the location bar. However if you do something to it afterwards, it will revert.

var num = 2
document.getElementById('spanId').innerHTML=(parseFloat(num).toFixed(2)-1)


shows 1 and not 1.00
| improve this answer | |
  • Works in FF 50, Chrome 49 and IE 8 – Florian Straub Jan 7 '17 at 11:21
1
var quantity = 12;

var import1 = 12.55;

var total = quantity * import1;

var answer = parseFloat(total).toFixed(2);

document.write(answer);
| improve this answer | |
1

I had to decide between the parseFloat() and Number() conversions before I could make toFixed() call. Here's an example of a number formatting post-capturing user input.

HTML:

<input type="number" class="dec-number" min="0" step="0.01" />

Event handler:

$('.dec-number').on('change', function () {
     const value = $(this).val();
     $(this).val(value.toFixed(2));
});

The above code will result in TypeError exception. Note that although the html input type is "number", the user input is actually a "string" data type. However, toFixed() function may only be invoked on an object that is a Number.

My final code would look as follows:

$('.dec-number').on('change', function () {
     const value = Number($(this).val());
     $(this).val(value.toFixed(2));
});

The reason I favor to cast with Number() vs. parseFloat() is because I don't have to perform an extra validation neither for an empty input string, nor NaN value. The Number() function would automatically handle an empty string and covert it to zero.

| improve this answer | |
1

Try below code:

function numberWithCommas(number) { 

   var newval = parseFloat(Math.round(number * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

   return newval.toString().replace(/\B(?=(\d{3})+(?!\d))/g, ",");
}
| improve this answer | |
0

I do like:

var num = 12.749;
parseFloat((Math.round(num * 100) / 100).toFixed(2)); // 123.75

Round the number with 2 decimal points, then make sure to parse it with parseFloat() to return Number, not String unless you don't care if it is String or Number.

| improve this answer | |
  • I guess if the purpose was to display with 2 decimals precision, parsing the float will mess with that. E.g. parseFloat("1.00") // 1 – Stijn de Witt Aug 1 '17 at 20:21
0

Extend Math object with precision method

Object.defineProperty(Math, 'precision',{
   value: function (value,precision,type){
             var v = parseFloat(value),
                 p = Math.max(precision,0)||0,
                 t = type||'round';
              return (Math[t](v*Math.pow(10,p))/Math.pow(10,p)).toFixed(p);
          }
    });

console.log(
    Math.precision(3.1,3), // round 3 digits 
    Math.precision(0.12345,2,'ceil'), // ceil 2 digits
    Math.precision(1.1) // integer part
)

| improve this answer | |
0

parseInt(number * 100) / 100; worked for me.

| improve this answer | |
0

here is another solution to round only using floor, meaning, making sure calculated amount won't be bigger than the original amount (sometimes needed for transactions):

Math.floor(num* 100 )/100;
| improve this answer | |
0

You can try this code:

    function FormatNumber(number, numberOfDigits = 2) {
        try {
            return new Intl.NumberFormat('en-US').format(parseFloat(number).toFixed(2));
        } catch (error) {
            return 0;
        }
    }

    var test1 = FormatNumber('1000000.4444');
    alert(test1); // 1,000,000.44

    var test2 = FormatNumber(100000000000.55555555, 4);
    alert(test2); // 100,000,000,000.56
| improve this answer | |
  • You better change the toFixed(2) to toFixed(numberOfDigits) :D – Jurgen Dictus Oct 13 at 6:49
0

var num1 = "0.1";
document.getElementById('num1').innerHTML = (Math.round(num1 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num2 = "1.341";
document.getElementById('num2').innerHTML = (Math.round(num2 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);

var num3 = "1.345";
document.getElementById('num3').innerHTML = (Math.round(num3 * 100) / 100).toFixed(2);
span {
    border: 1px solid #000;
    margin: 5px;
    padding: 5px;
}
<span id="num1"></span>
<span id="num2"></span>
<span id="num3"></span>

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    This piece of code is enough to achieve your requirement parseFloat(num.toFixed(2)) – kva Feb 26 at 10:45
0

RegExp - alternative approach

On input you have string (because you use parse) so we can get result by using only string manipulations and integer number calculations

let toFix2 = (n) => n.replace(/(-?)(\d+)\.(\d\d)(\d+)/, (_,s,i,d,r)=> {
  let k= (+r[0]>=5)+ +d - (r==5 && s=='-');
  return s + (+i+(k>99)) + "." + ((k>99)?"00":(k>9?k:"0"+k));
})


// TESTs

console.log(toFix2("1"));
console.log(toFix2("1.341"));
console.log(toFix2("1.345"));
console.log(toFix2("1.005"));

Explanation

  • s is sign, i is integer part, d are first two digits after dot, r are other digits (we use r[0] value to calc rounding)
  • k contains information about last two digits (represented as integer number)
  • if r[0] is >=5 then we add 1 to d - but in case when we have minus number (s=='-') and r is exact equal to 5 then in this case we substract 1 (for compatibility reasons - in same way Math.round works for minus numbers e.g Math.round(-1.5)==-1)
  • after that if last two digits k are greater than 99 then we add one to integer part i
| improve this answer | |
-3
(num + "").replace(/^([0-9]*)(\.[0-9]{1,2})?.*$/,"$1$2")
| improve this answer | |

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