3

How can I turn a list of dicts like this

dico = [{'a':1}, {'b':2}, {'c':1}, {'d':2}, {'e':2}, {'d':3}, {'g':1}, {'h':4}, {'h':2}, {'f':6}, {'a':2}, {'b':2}]

Into a single dict like this

{'a':3, 'b':4, 'c':1, 'd':5,'e':2,'f':6 , 'g':1 ,'h':6}

At the moment when doing this

result = {}
for d in dico:
  result.update(d)
print(result)

Result :

{'a': 2, 'b': 2, 'c': 1, 'd': 3, 'e': 2, 'g': 1, 'h': 2, 'f': 6}
4

Just replace your dictionary with collections.Counter and it will work:

from collections import Counter

dico = [{'a':1}, {'b':2}, {'c':1}, {'d':2}, {'e':2}, {'d':3}, {'g':1}, {'h':4}, {'h':2}, {'f':6}, {'a':2}, {'b':2}]

result = Counter()
for d in dico:
    result.update(d)
print(result)

Output:

Counter({'h': 6, 'f': 6, 'd': 5, 'b': 4, 'a': 3, 'e': 2, 'c': 1, 'g': 1})

Why the above works with update for Counter from the docs:

Elements are counted from an iterable or added-in from another mapping (or counter). Like dict.update() but adds counts instead of replacing them. Also, the iterable is expected to be a sequence of elements, not a sequence of (key, value) pairs.

0
3

Here's a fancy way to do it using collections.Counter, which is a kind of dictionary:

from collections import Counter

def add_dicts(dicts):
    return sum(map(Counter, dicts), Counter())

The above is not efficient for a large number of dictionaries since it creates many intermediate Counter objects for the result, rather than updating one result in-place, so it runs in quadratic time. Here's a similar solution which runs in linear time:

from collections import Counter

def add_dicts(dicts):
    out = Counter()
    for d in dicts:
        out += d
    return out
3

Using a defaultdict:

from collections import defaultdict
dct = defaultdict(int)

for element in dico:
    for key, value in element.items():
        dct[key] += value

print(dct)

Which yields

defaultdict(<class 'int'>, 
    {'a': 3, 'b': 4, 'c': 1, 'd': 5, 'e': 2, 'g': 1, 'h': 6, 'f': 6})


As for time measurements, this is a comparison between the four answers:

from collections import defaultdict, Counter
from timeit import timeit

def solution_dani():
    result = sum((Counter(e) for e in dico), Counter())

def solution_kaya():
    return sum(map(Counter, dico), Counter())

def solution_roadrunner():
    result = Counter()
    for d in dico:
        result.update(d)
    return result

def solution_jan():
    dct = defaultdict(int)
    for element in dico:
        for key, value in element.items():
            dct[key] += value
    return dct

print(timeit(solution_dani, number=10000))
print(timeit(solution_kaya, number=10000))
print(timeit(solution_roadrunner, number=10000))
print(timeit(solution_jan, number=10000))

On my MacBookAir this yields

0.839742998
0.8093687279999999
0.18643740100000006
0.04764247300000002

So the solution with a default dict is by far the fastest (factor 15-20), followed by @RoadRunner.

0
2

Use collections.Counter and sum:

from collections import Counter

dico = [{'a':1}, {'b':2}, {'c':1}, {'d':2}, {'e':2}, {'d':3}, {'g':1}, {'h':4}, {'h':2}, {'f':6}, {'a':2}, {'b':2}]


result = sum((Counter(e) for e in dico), Counter())
print(result)

Output

Counter({'h': 6, 'f': 6, 'd': 5, 'b': 4, 'a': 3, 'e': 2, 'c': 1, 'g': 1})

If you need an strict dictionary do:

result = dict(sum((Counter(e) for e in dico), Counter()))
print(result)

You could modify your approach, like this:

result = {}
for d in dico:
    for key, value in d.items():
        result[key] = result.get(key, 0) + value

print(result)

The update method will replace the values of existing keys, from the documentation:

Update the dictionary with the key/value pairs from other, overwriting existing keys.

0
1
import collections

counter = collections.Counter()

for d in dico:
    counter.update(d)

result = dict(counter)
print(result)

Output

{'a': 3, 'b': 4, 'c': 1, 'd': 5, 'e': 2, 'g': 1, 'h': 6, 'f': 6}

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