84

Why does C# allow code blocks without a preceding statement (e.g. if, else, for, while)?

void Main()
{
    {   // any sense in this?
        Console.Write("foo");
    }
}
  • 70
    Is there any reason it shouldn't? – Jamiec May 26 '11 at 10:06
  • 29
    But as answers show it has more meaning than just "doesn't hurt, so let allow it". This is a point of asking such questions. – Seldon May 26 '11 at 10:13
  • 8
    +1 question sounds innocent enough, but answers have really taught me something valuable – Nicolas78 May 26 '11 at 11:34
  • 7
    @Akash: Without asking why, we will never get better. – richard May 26 '11 at 14:30
  • 7
    @Akash: That seems like a high-brow elitist attitude. People always have questions, and if there is no reason to ask why, then there is no point in having SO. This site isn't so much for having people solve our immediate problems (though that does happen), but to provide a repository of questions and answers that will help us all be better programmers. SO is for asking WHY! :-) – richard May 26 '11 at 16:03
88

In the context you give, there is no significance. Writing a constant string to the console is going to work the same way anywhere in program flow.1

Instead, you typically use them to restrict the scope of some local variables. This is further elaborated here and here. Look at João Angelo’s answer and Chris Wallis’s answer for brief examples. I believe the same applies to some other languages with C-style syntax as well, not that they’d be relevant to this question though.


1 Unless, of course, you decide to try to be funny and create your own Console class, with a Write() method that does something entirely unexpected.

  • 24
    Re: other languages: usually, but not always. JavaScript is a notable exception; declaring a local variable in a particular block does not scope the variable to the block. – Eric Lippert May 26 '11 at 15:23
  • @EricLippert: In C#, does declaring a variable within a block cause the variable to be scoped from the perspective of the run-time? From what I can tell, variables' lifetimes are often not bounded by scoping blocks, a fact which is observable in mixed-language projects if the first thing done with a variable in a loop is to pass it as an out parameter to an interface implementation written in another language, and that implementation reads the variable before writing it. – supercat Jul 14 '15 at 17:25
  • And in C++, because of RAII instead of GC, it is far more useful. – Deduplicator Dec 23 '15 at 1:44
142

The { ... } has at least the side-effect of introducing a new scope for local variables.

I tend to use them in switch statements to provide a different scope for each case and in this way allowing me to define local variable with the same name at closest possible location of their use and to also denote that they are only valid at the case level.

  • 6
    It's worth reading blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/08/03/… – Dan Diplo May 26 '11 at 13:36
  • 6
    If you need scopes in your cases, they're too big! Extract Method. – Jay Bazuzi May 26 '11 at 14:03
  • 19
    @Jay Bazuzi, just because I want to have a local variable with the same name in more than one case doesn't mean they have to be huge. You're just jumping to huge conclusions... :) – João Angelo May 26 '11 at 14:35
  • Congrats on your Great Answer badge! :) – BoltClock Sep 1 '11 at 21:02
  • 1
    @BoltClock, thanks, I just need some more questions about {} to keep those gold badges coming... :) – João Angelo Sep 1 '11 at 21:38
55

It is not so much a feature of C# than it is a logical side-effect of many C syntax languages that use braces to define scope.

In your example the braces have no effect at all, but in the following code they define the scope, and therefore the visibility, of a variable:

This is allowed as i falls out of scope in the first block and is defined again in the next:

{
    {
        int i = 0;
    }

    {
        int i = 0;
    }
}

This is not allowed as i has fallen out of scope and is no longer visible in the outer scope:

{
    {
        int i = 0;
    }

    i = 1;
}

And so on and so on.

  • 1
    I've read about disparities in bracket nomenclature in various flavors of English, but in which flavor are {} known as parentheses? – BoltClock May 26 '11 at 10:46
  • Good question! I guess a mentor of mine planted it in my brain a decade ago. I should probably be calling them 'curly brackets' or 'braces'. Each to their own... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – Chris Wallis May 26 '11 at 10:52
  • 10
    In my vocab '(' = parenthesis, '{' = brace, '[' = square brackets – pb. May 26 '11 at 12:18
  • Hang on, I would call them a curly bracket, and Wikipedia includes that naming. The Oxford English Dictionary defines this use of bracket as: One of two marks of the form [ ] or ( ), and in mathematical use also {}, used for enclosing a word or number of words, a portion of a mathematical formula, or the like, so as to separate it from the context; In any case they are not parentheses, but 'curly bracket' seems OK. – dumbledad Jan 31 '13 at 16:02
  • IME, "curly braces" and "square brackets". – cp.engr Sep 14 '16 at 16:25
17

I consider {} as a statement that can contain several statements.

Consider an if statement that exists out of a boolean expression followed by one statement. This would work:

if (true) Console.Write("FooBar");

This would work as well:

if (true)
{
  Console.Write("Foo");
  Console.Write("Bar");
}

If I'm not mistaken this is called a block statement.

Since {} can contain other statements it can also contain other {}. The scope of a variable is defined by it's parent {} (block statement).

The point that I'm trying to make is that {} is just a statement, so it doesn't require an if or whatever...

  • +1 That is exactly what braces are in C-style languages - a so-called "compound statement". – Michael Ekstrand Jun 3 '11 at 17:43
11

The general rule in C-syntax languages is "anything between { } should be treated as a single statement, and it can go wherever a single statement could":

  • After an if.
  • After a for, while or do.
  • Anywhere in code.

For all intents and purposes, it's as the language grammar included this:

     <statement> :== <definition of valid statement> | "{" <statement-list> "}"
<statement-list> :== <statement> | <statement-list> <statement>

That is, "a statement can be composed of (various things) or of an opening brace, followed by a statement list (which may include one or more statements), followed by a closed brace". I.E. "a { } block can replace any statement, anywhere". Including in the middle of code.

Not allowing a { } block anywhere a single statement can go would actually have made the language definition more complex.

1

Because C++ (and java) allowed code blocks without a preceding statement.

C++ allowed them because C did.

You could say it all comes down to the fact that USA programme language (C based) design won rather than European programme language (Modula-2 based) design.

(Control statements act on a single statement, statements can be groups to create new statements)

  • Do you mean Module2, or Modula2? – Richard Ev May 26 '11 at 15:14
  • Indeed, this is the correct answer. Further, I'd just answer "Because every computer language does." – Fattie Jan 29 '16 at 16:07
1
// if (a == b)
// if (a != b)
{
    // do something
}
0

1Because...Its Maintain the Scope Area of the statement.. or Function, This is really useful for mane the large code..

{
    {
        // Here this 'i' is we can use for this scope only and out side of this scope we can't get this 'i' variable.

        int i = 0;
    }

    {
        int i = 0;
    }
}

enter image description here

0

You asked "why" C# allows code blocks without preceeding statements. The question "why" could also be interpreted as "what would be possible benefits of this construct?"

Personally, I use statement-less code blocks in C# where readability is greatly improved for other developers, while keeping in mind that the code block limits the scope of local variables. For example, consider the following code snippet, which is a lot easier to read thanks to the additional code blocks:

OrgUnit world = new OrgUnit() { Name = "World" };
{
    OrgUnit europe = new OrgUnit() { Name = "Europe" };
    world.SubUnits.Add(europe);
    {
        OrgUnit germany = new OrgUnit() { Name = "Germany" };
        europe.SubUnits.Add(germany);

        //...etc.
    }
}
//...commit structure to DB here

I'm aware that this could be solved more elegantly by using methods for each structure level. But then again, keep in mind that things like sample data seeders usually need to be quick.

So even though the code above is executed linearly, the code structure represents the "real-world" structure of the objects, thus making it easier for other developers to understand, maintain and extend.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.