5

The last time I used C++ concepts with GCC and the fconcepts flag the following snippet used to work

template <typename T, typename U>
concept equality_comparable = requires(T a, U b) {
  { a == b } -> bool;
  { a != b } -> bool;
};

Apparently this is no longer the case and a return-type-requirement after a compound requirement can now only contain type constraints. If I'm not mistaken this basically means using another concept to satisfy the return-type-requirement.

So the perfectly readable and (for C++ standards) short snippet becomes

template <typename From, typename To>
concept convertible_to = std::is_convertible_v<From, To>;

template <typename T, typename U>
concept equality_comparable = requires(T a, U b) {
  { a == b } -> convertible_to<bool>;
  { a != b } -> convertible_to<bool>;
};

Of course this isn't even a full implementation, but let's ignore that for now. Could someone maybe explain to me why the committee decided to change that? Personally I find that "implicitly used template parameter" in the convertible_to concept extremely irritating and confusing.

  • 2
    "So the perfectly readable and (for C++ standards) short snippet becomes" The phrase "perfectly readable" depends entirely on who is doing the reading. If the person doing the reading is unaware that -> type means "convertible to" rather than "same as", then that's a problem. – Nicol Bolas Apr 24 at 15:36
  • @Barry Yes, you're right. I need to get a C++ book with concepts coverage. – S.S. Anne Apr 24 at 17:00
8

Well, what does this actually mean:

template <typename T, typename U>
concept equality_comparable = requires(T a, U b) {
  { a == b } -> bool;
  { a != b } -> bool;
};

Does it mean a == b must have type exactly bool, or does it mean if you decay the type you get bool (i.e. const bool or bool& are ok), or does it mean convertible to bool (i.e. std::true_type is ok)? I don't think it's at all clear from the syntax - and any one of these three could be meaningfully desired by a particular concept (as P1452 points out, at the time, the ratio of Same<T> to ConvertibleTo<T> in concepts was 40-14).

The paper also goes on to point out that in the Concepts TS, where -> Type existed, we also had the ability to write something like vector<Concept>... or -> vector<Concept> as a requirement. That's a type, but would behave very difficultly with the decltype(()) semantics we adopted in P1084.

Basically I don't think the "perfectly readable" snippet actually is - there are multiple potential meanings for that syntax, all of which can be the desired meaning depending on context. And the most commonly used one at the time (same_as<bool>) isn't even the one we want here (convertible_to<bool>).


Personally I find that "implicitly used template parameter" in the convertible_to concept extremely irritating and confusing.

It's novel in C++, but I personally find it reads quite nicely in these cases. Seeing:

{ a == b } -> convertible_to<bool>;

Just reads exactly as the requirement: a == b needs to be a valid expression that's convertible to bool. For unary concepts, it makes the usage quite nice since you can use them in place of the somewhat meaningless typename/class keyword:

template <range R>
void algo(R&& r);

Which isn't that different from other languages. Like, in Rust for instance:

fn algo<I: Iterator>(i: I)

There the "implicitly used template parameter" is so implicit that it's not even part of the trait declaration, it's implicit there too:

pub trait Iterator { ... }

So even with a longer-form syntax, you'd write where I: Iterator whereas in C++ you'd still write requires range<R>.

This isn't strictly related to the original question, but I just find it interesting to add for some other color.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the clarification. I guess I haven't thought about the unary concept usage in that way. It really does read fluent. Guess we will have to wait for the concepts library headers to get implemented though, because without it concepts usage feels pretty restricted. – Vinci Apr 24 at 20:01
  • @Vinci gcc 10 will be released sometime in the next few weeks and has a lot of C++20 already. Plenty to play with! – Barry Apr 24 at 20:13

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