1

The window is working with COUNT, AVG, etc. but not works with percentile_disc

  SELECT
       x,
       COUNT(*) OVER w AS w_count, -- fine
       AVG(x) OVER w   AS avg_x,     -- fine
       percentile_disc(0.5) within group (order by x) OVER w AS mdn_x  -- BUG!
  FROM t
  WINDOW w AS (ROWS BETWEEN 3 PRECEDING AND CURRENT ROW)
  ORDER BY 1

(edited),

  • PostgreSQL v10.12 say syntax error at or near "OVER".
  • PostgreSQL v12.2 say OVER is not supported for ordered-set aggregate percentile_disc

Seems that is not possible... There are some workaround? Perhaps a lateral join with a subquery.


As explained here, the MEDIAN is important, better tham AVG in anomaly analysis. As well the moving median, better (most resilient) tham moving average.

2
+50

I just thought of yet another possibility. We can create an aggregate and use it just like built-in avg or count.

Let's start with an aggregator:

create function median_sfunc (
    state integer[], data integer
) returns integer[] as
$$
begin
    if state is null then
        return array[data];
    else
        return state || data;
    end if;
end;
$$ language plpgsql;

And then the finisher:

create function median_ffunc (
    state integer[]
) returns double precision as
$$
begin
    return (state[(array_length(state, 1) + 1)/ 2] + state[(array_length(state, 1) + 2) / 2]) / 2.;
end;
$$ language plpgsql;

Of course the supplier (initial state) will be the empty query. Thus we get the aggregate:

create aggregate median (integer) (
    sfunc     = median_sfunc,
    stype     = integer[],
    finalfunc = median_ffunc
    );

Now you can call it in an elegant way no matter the window you're using:

select x,
       count(*) over w as w_count,
       avg(x) over w as avg_x,
       median(x) over w as mdn_x
from tmp t
    window w as (order by x rows between 3 preceding and current row)
| improve this answer | |
  • Hi, perfect! The only adaptations I made for use in real life, generalizing to "any numeric type", were FUNCTION median_sfunc (state anyarray, data anyelement) RETURNS anyarray, etc. and add IMMUTABLE clause. It is not relevant, I used also language SQL (with simple SELECT CASE), because I prefer the standard SQL whenever possible ... and also renamed to smallSeq_median to remember that is a workaround for small numeric sequences, to take care with big windows on Big Data. – Peter Krauss Apr 30 at 10:00
  • @PeterKrauss you're right, that's even more general, feel free to edit my answer to change the types;) – Andronicus Apr 30 at 10:07
  • Thanks @Andronicus, there are another interesting issues and a little error in your simplification, please check/collabore with the Wiki answer below. – Peter Krauss May 3 at 11:21
1

Unfortunately ordered-set aggregate functions do not support windows. You can compute it by hand as a workaround:

select x,
       count(*) over w as w_count,
       avg(x) over w   as avg_x,
       (lag(x, 2) over w + lag(x) over w) / 2. as mdn_x
from tmp t
    window w as (rows between 3 preceding and current row)
order by 1;

Here is a working demo. This does not work for the first 3 rows though. If you want it to work for every row, then the corner cases need to be checked:

select x,
       count(*) over w as w_count,
       avg(x) over w   as avg_x,
       case
           when lag(x) over w is null then x
           when lag(x, 2) over w is null then (x + lag(x) over w) / 2.
           when lag(x, 3) over w is null then lag(x) over w
           else (lag(x, 2) over w + lag(x) over w) / 2.
           end
from tmp t
    window w as (rows between 3 preceding and current row)
order by 1;

Here is a demo.

Of course your example is quite easy, because the window is not large (only 4 elements), but the exact query gets really long for larger windows.

Edit:

The first query can be generalized as:

select x,
       count(*) over w as w_count,
       avg(x) over w   as avg_x,
       (lag(x, (N + 1) / 2) over w + lag(x, N / 2) over w) / 2. as mdn_x
from tmp t
    window w as (rows between N preceding and current row)
order by 1;

where N is the number of rows to look back. This holds for even N, but in that case, the last column can be simplified to:

lag(x, N / 2) over w as mdn_x

The exact query would have to be rewritten as:

select x,
       count(*) over w as w_count,
       avg(x) over w   as avg_x,
       case
           when lag(x) over w is null then x
           when lag(x, 2) over w is null then (x + lag(x) over w) / 2.
           -- other terms
           when lag(x, N) over w is null then (lag(x, (N - 1) / 2) over w + lag(x, N / 2) over w) / 2.
           else (lag(x, 2) over w + lag(x) over w) / 2.
           end
from tmp t
    window w as (rows between N preceding and current row)
order by 1;

with the general formula for corner cases:

when lag(x, M) over w is null then (lag(x, (m - 1) / 2) over w + lag(x, m / 2) over w) / 2.

I cannot think of any method other than metaprogramming / dynamic query in this case. When the window reaches following rows, the formula gets more complicated, because depending on the sign of rows preceding and following - lag or lead should be used.

| improve this answer | |
  • Hi @Andronicus, thanks. Seems perfect as workaround! Can I edit the question replacing 3 to 5, to be more didactic? – Peter Krauss Apr 28 at 7:35
  • @PeterKrauss I'm glad you like it! Honestly I'd rather you don't change it, You can see the whole definition of mode and the query will be less readable. The only change would be for odd length of window - that would be the mid element in the first query – Andronicus Apr 28 at 7:59
  • Hum... Details, no important, only maybe little issues for first (main) solution ... 1. as I used order by x, it can be used at w; 2. ideal, to be didactic or to use template-solution, is to comment the parity of L, the length of the window, and the choice of floor(L/2) in the parameter, e.g. lag(x, floor(L/2.)) when L is odd. ... Or maybe starting with the general solution, defined in the Wikipedia as ( lag(x, floor((L+1)/2.)) + lag(x, ceil((L+1)/2.)) )/2, so you can express odd and even cases as simplifications. – Peter Krauss Apr 28 at 13:41
  • @PeterKrauss I have elaborated a bit about the more general case, I hope it's sufficient :) – Andronicus Apr 28 at 17:55
  • This answer is good to big windows on Big Data, and to remember that PostgreSQL developers can optimize the aggregate median(). – Peter Krauss Apr 30 at 10:04
0

@Andronicus pointed the best "workaround strategies", but general solution need polymorphic datatypes and some fine ajust. With version 9.3+ PostgreSQL we can also optimize the aggregate calculus on windows (Moving-Aggregate Mode), that is important for a workaround.

This is the correct solution

This solution is the best that we can do in nowadays (year 2020), it is only a "good and reliable workaround": please let the PostgreSQL developers know (RAM and CPU consumptions).

create or replace FUNCTION smallseq_agg_sfunc (
    state anyarray, data anyelement
) RETURNS anyarray as $f$
  SELECT   state || data
$f$ language SQL IMMUTABLE;

create or replace FUNCTION array_median(state anyarray) returns anyelement as $f$
  SELECT percentile_cont(0.5) within group (ORDER BY s)
  FROM unnest(state) t(s)
$f$ language SQL IMMUTABLE;

create or replace AGGREGATE smallset_median (anyelement) (
  sfunc     = smallseq_agg_sfunc,
  stype     = anyarray,
  finalfunc = array_median,
  initcond  = '{}'
);

A name prefix like smallset_ is important to remember that it is a workaround, valid only for small sets or ordered small sequences. When it is small, no problem in reorder an ordered sequence. In a context of Big Data (big windows or big tables), we must to check performance of this workaround.

The order characterizes the median operation, is very important, and in a window or GROUP BY clause is usual to mix many variables (many orders), so the order by is useful in a function of general-use library. You can replace AVG without fear!

Didactic comments

Mathematicians define the mean as

enter image description here

so, we can implement it and avoid the order by clause for ordered sequences:

create or replace FUNCTION smallseq_percentile_cont (
    state anyarray 
) returns double precision as $f$
  SELECT ( s[floor((up+1)*0.5)] + s[ceil((up+1)*0.5)] )::double precision / 2.
  FROM ( SELECT array_agg(x) FROM unnest(state) t(x)) ) t1(s)
       , ( SELECT array_upper(state,1) ) t2(up)
$f$ language SQL IMMUTABLE;

Please avoid to simplify by (s[(up + 1)/ 2] + s[(up + 2) / 2]), it is not correct. You can replace the 0.5 by a parameter to obtain the percentile_cont(fraction) analog. For an unordered sets (smallset_percentile_cont implementation) you can add ORDER BY x after t(x).

More general cases

Is important to remember that "classic median" is based on continuous percentile (cont), but there are also the discrete percentile (disc).

The build-in function percentile_cont() not make sense for text datatype and others, and sometimes we need to preserve median in the same datatype (e.g. integer and not double), or use a sample element. In this context we are thinking about the percentile_disc(). Suppose also that, as useful generic array function, we prefer parametric one:

create or replace FUNCTION array_percentile_disc(
  state anyarray, p float DEFAULT 0.5
) returns anyelement as $f$
  SELECT percentile_disc(p) within group (ORDER BY s)
  FROM unnest(state) t(s)
$f$ language SQL IMMUTABLE;

create or replace FUNCTION array_median_disc(state anyarray)
returns anyelement as $wrap$
  SELECT array_percentile_disc($1)
$wrap$ language SQL IMMUTABLE;

create or replace AGGREGATE smallset_median_disc (anyelement) (
  sfunc     = smallseq_agg_sfunc,
  stype     = anyarray,
  finalfunc = array_median_disc,
  initcond  = '{}'
);

There are another problem with PostgreSQL: it is impossible to define a second parameter for finalfunc, so, if you need for example to define AGGREGATE smallseq_percentile_disc(anyelement,float) you need to define each one, for example for "90% discrete" define more one wrap function array_perc90_disc() using array_percentile_disc($1,0.9).

Moving-Aggregate Mode option

See Pg Guide.

... please collabore here: this answer is a Wiki!

Big Data workaround

As @Andronicus suggested, we can use lag(). In this case is important also to remember to check the order of the window, maybe you need a specific window for median.

SELECT x, avg_x,
       CASE WHEN w_count<9001 THEN NULL ELSE mdn_x END mdn_x 
FROM (
  SELECT x,
       count(*) over w   AS w_count,
       avg(x)   over w   AS avg_x,
       (
         lag(x, floor(9002*0.5)::double precision / 2.) over w 
         + lag(x, ceil(9002*0.5)::double precision / 2.) over w 
       ) / 2.            AS mdn_x
  FROM t
  WINDOW w as (ORDER BY x rows between 9000 preceding and current row)
) t_aux

We can use w_count to generalize and avoid initial nulls, and now supposing also a "discrete median", we can use:

SELECT x, w_count, avg_x,
       lag( x, floor(w_count*0.5) ) over w2 AS mdn_x
FROM (
  SELECT x,
       count(*) over w   AS w_count,
       avg(x)   over w   AS avg_x
  FROM t
  WINDOW w1 as (rows between 9000 preceding and current row)
) t_aux
WINDOW w2 as (ORDER BY x rows between 9000 preceding and current row)

Important that w2 is a clone of w1, except by the ORDER clause.

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