16

I have a parent dataclass and a sub-dataclass inherits the first class. I've redefined __eq__() method in parent dataclass. But when I compare objects sub-dataclass, it doesn't use the __eq__() method defined in parent dataclass. Why is this happening? How can I fix this?

MWE:

from dataclasses import dataclass


@dataclass
class A:
    name: str
    field1: str = None

    def __eq__(self, other):
        print('A class eq')
        return self.name == other.name


@dataclass
class B(A):
    field2: str = None


b1 = B('b', 'b1')
b2 = B('b', 'b2')
print(b1 == b2)
1
  • 1
    I think the @dataclass decorator adds a default __eq__ implementation.
    – khelwood
    Commented Apr 25, 2020 at 18:31

2 Answers 2

17

The @dataclass decorator adds a default __eq__ implementation.

If you use

@dataclass(eq=False)

on class B, it will avoid doing that.

See https://docs.python.org/3/library/dataclasses.html

0
4

By default, the dataclass decorator generates an __eq__ method for the decorated class. To disable this (allowing B to inherit A.__eq__), you need to adjust the decorator.

@dataclass(eq=False)
class B(A):
    field2: str = None
5
  • The generated __eq__ won't invoke the base class __eq__? I'd expect the base class one to check the base class members, and for the derived class one to invoke it to check the base class members then go on to check the derived class ones itself. Commented Jul 6, 2023 at 19:32
  • The generated method compares all applicable fields, including those inherited from the base class, instead of calling the base-class method explicitly.
    – chepner
    Commented Jul 6, 2023 at 19:51
  • When the base class isn't a dataclass it appears to ignore the fields from the base entirely, which seems like a footgun. Commented Jul 7, 2023 at 3:18
  • 1
    If the base class isn't a dataclass, it doesn't have fields. "Field" isn't just a synonym for "instance attribute" here; it's a specific kind of object that the dataclass decorator uses to generate methods. The user doesn't need to define Field objects explicitly, though they can using dataclasses.field: dataclass can use the class's annotations and class attributes to define them.
    – chepner
    Commented Jul 7, 2023 at 15:31
  • All of which is to say, trying to define a dataclass using a non-dataclass base class is probably not a good idea.
    – chepner
    Commented Jul 7, 2023 at 15:32

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