3

When you run the perf utility with a command, one of the output lines you get looks like:

          2.088031      task-clock (msec)         #    0.700 CPUs utilized

and if you use perf stat --all-cpus --no-aggr, you get one of these lines per CPU core, e.g.:

CPU0             38.518960      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.528 CPUs utilized
CPU1             38.564135      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.529 CPUs utilized
CPU2             38.611806      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.529 CPUs utilized

I don't understand what this means, exactly - in both cases; I only have a guess:

  1. In the aggregated case, is it "The mean number of CPUs on which threads of this process were running between the wall-clock time of process launch and process exit"?
  2. In the disaggregated case - is it "the fraction of the time during which some thread of the process was executing on the listed CPU core"?

But these guesses are full of assumptions. What is the exact meaning of these figures in both cases? Also, how do they account for time spent within kernel calls by threads of the process? How do they account for multiple threads of the same process working on the same core? A thorough explanation would be greatly appreciated.

6
  • This doesn't really relate to programming, maybe SuperUser?
    – jonrsharpe
    Apr 26, 2020 at 14:58
  • 1
    @jonrsharpe: Performance measurement is an important part of software development, and there are 261 questions about perf on the site.
    – einpoklum
    Apr 26, 2020 at 15:00
  • @einpoklum What perf and Linux kernel version are you using ? Apr 26, 2020 at 16:29
  • @ArnabjyotiKalita: Why is that important? Did the semantics change at some point?
    – einpoklum
    Apr 26, 2020 at 21:31
  • @einpoklum The semantics, in the overall context and meaning, probably did not change. It gives me a reference from which I can explain the origin of these values to you, and also offer you information about any new options added/removed. Apr 27, 2020 at 1:50

2 Answers 2

3

I will explain your guesses one by one.

Case 2

Using perf stat -all-cpus --no-aggr :

./perf stat -vvv -all-cpus --no-aggr ls                                                                                                                   [957/1827]
Using CPUID GenuineIntel-6-4F                                                                                                                                                                               
intel_pt default config: tsc,pt,branch                                                                                                                                                                      
------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                
perf_event_attr:                                                                                                                                                                                            
  type                             1                                                                                                                                                                        
  size                             112                                                                                                                                                                      
  sample_type                      IDENTIFIER                                                                                                                                                               
  read_format                      TOTAL_TIME_ENABLED|TOTAL_TIME_RUNNING                                                                                                                                    
  disabled                         1                                                                                                                                                                        
  inherit                          1                                                                                                                                                                        
  exclude_guest                    1                                                                                                                                                                        
------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 0  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 3
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 1  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 4
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 2  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 5
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 3  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 7
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 4  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 8
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 5  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 9
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 6  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 10
sys_perf_event_open: pid -1  cpu 7  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 11

---------------------------------------------------------------

CPU0              7.628452      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.509 CPUs utilized
CPU1              7.622132      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.509 CPUs utilized
CPU2              7.648510      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.511 CPUs utilized
CPU3              7.644246      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.510 CPUs utilized
CPU4              7.670066      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.512 CPUs utilized
CPU5              7.689670      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.513 CPUs utilized
CPU6              7.687918      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.513 CPUs utilized
CPU7              7.715103      cpu-clock (msec)          #    0.515 CPUs utilized

The calls to sys_perf_event_open reflect that the pid = -1, which means the pid associated with the command ls is not being measured. These are characteristic of per-CPU measurements, which means the event cpu-clock targets the particular CPU and not a particular task. All threads running on that particular CPU will be monitored. Measurements will start for each CPU independently. These measurements will continue only till the command ls executes.

cpu-clock event (as well as task-clock) events use the software hrtimer to sample. At the start of the measurement, the function cpu_clock_event_start here sets up the hrtimer with a sample period like below-

} else {
        period = max_t(u64, 10000, hwc->sample_period);
    }
    hrtimer_start(&hwc->hrtimer, ns_to_ktime(period),
              HRTIMER_MODE_REL_PINNED_HARD);
}

After the hrtimer expires, the function perf_swevent_hrtimer will read and update the cpu-clock counter values periodically. The values of cpu-clock reflect the running difference (in jiffies) between the last sampled value and the current sampled value. To obtain the % CPU utilization, you divide the cpu-clock value by the wall-clock time taken by the command to run.

This wall clock time taken by the command to run is maintained here. In particular, look at the computation of t1 and t0.

So 2) should be --> in the disaggregated case, "it is the fraction of CPU utlilized by all the threads running on that CPU for the duration of time that the command executes."

Case 1:

Using perf stat <command>

./perf stat -vvv ls                                                                                                                                          
Using CPUID GenuineIntel-6-4F                                                                                                                                                                               
intel_pt default config: tsc,pt,branch                                                                                                                                                                      
------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                
perf_event_attr:                                                                                                                                                                                            
  type                             1                                                                                                                                                                        
  size                             112                                                                                                                                                                      
  config                           0x1                                                                                                                                                                      
  sample_type                      IDENTIFIER                                                                                                                                                               
  read_format                      TOTAL_TIME_ENABLED|TOTAL_TIME_RUNNING                                                                                                                                    
  disabled                         1                                                                                                                                                                        
  inherit                          1                                                                                                                                                                        
  enable_on_exec                   1                                                                                                                                                                        
  exclude_guest                    1                                                                                                                                                                        
------------------------------------------------------------                                                                                                                                                
sys_perf_event_open: pid 1833  cpu -1  group_fd -1  flags 0x8 = 3 

------------------------------------------------------------

2.120763      task-clock (msec)         #    0.038 CPUs utilized                                                                                                                                           

Now the calls to sys_perf_event_open reflect that the pid=1833 which is the pid of the process associated with the command ls. However, the value of CPU = -1 means that whenever this process gets scheduled, irrespective of whichever CPU it gets scheduled to, the software hrtimer that counts task-clock will be updated. Note that, this count will now be specific to the process and all the threads associated with only this process.

The scheduler maintains information with regards to when the process gets scheduled in and scheduled out with the help of functions perf_event_task_sched_in and perf_event_task_sched_out. The function update_context_time maintains the total time that the task has executed.

static void update_context_time(struct perf_event_context *ctx)
{
    u64 now = perf_clock();

    ctx->time += now - ctx->timestamp;
    ctx->timestamp = now;
}

ctx->time maintains the total time the task has executed on any particular CPU. The ctx->timestamp value maintains the timestamp at which either the software hrtimer expired, or the event associated with this process was scheduled out, or the event was disabled.

The computation of the ratio is now the total time that the process spends executing on any CPU divided by the wall-clock time that the process executes. The wall-clock time computation is the same as in Case 2.

2

The "comment" lines are (AFAIK) always calculated from the event / counter on that line divided by something else. Often per second of real time, so you get instructions / second on the instructions line. But time/time is dimensionless, and in this case is a utilization ratio.

The normal output (for a single process) is (AFAIK) simply
task-clock / wall-time = average number of cores utilized.

I assume it's the same idea similar for the per-CPU case,
cpu-clock / wall-time = average utilization of this core.

2
  • 1. You write "as far as I know", but - do you actually know this to be the case? 2. Also, what you've written sounds the same as what I've written, just phrased differently.
    – einpoklum
    Apr 26, 2020 at 21:33
  • 1
    @einpoklum: My answer makes testable prediction: that the printed utilization is always cpu-clock or task-clock / wall-clock. I'm pretty sure that's true based on my experience with perf and other event counters, but no it's not something I've specifically verified. But assuming that's true, it sounds like some of your question is what cpu-clock and task-clock actually mean. I assume the kernel's scheduler just notes the time when it context-switches to and away from a task (thread) on a given core, and totals this for the whole process. Apr 26, 2020 at 21:39

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