1

Imagine I have given a directed graph and I want a numpy reachability matrix whether a path exists, so R(i,j)=1 if and only if there is a path from i to j;

networkx has the function has_path(G, source, target), however it is only for specific source and taget nodes; Therefore, I've so far been doing this:

import networkx as nx
R=np.zeros((d,d))
for i in range(d):
   for j in range(d):
      if nx.has_path(G, i, j):
         R[i,j]=1

Is there a nicer way to achieve this?

Here would be a minimum example with real numbers:

import networkx as nx
import numpy as np

c=np.random.rand(4,4)
G=nx.DiGraph(c)
A=nx.minimum_spanning_arborescence(G)

adj=nx.to_numpy_matrix(A)

Here we can see that this would be the adjacency but not reachability matrix - with my number example I would get

adj=
matrix([[0.        , 0.        , 0.        , 0.        ],
        [0.        , 0.        , 0.47971056, 0.        ],
        [0.        , 0.        , 0.        , 0.        ],
        [0.16101491, 0.04779295, 0.        , 0.        ]])

So there is a path from 4 to 2 (adj(4,2)>0) and from 2 to 3 (adj(2,3)>0) so there also would be a path from 4 to 3 but adj(4,3)=0

2
  • Please add a sample input and expected output Apr 27 '20 at 10:48
  • 1
    1 minute, will do :-)
    – Johannes
    Apr 27 '20 at 10:55
1

You could use all_pairs_shortest_path_length:

import networkx as nx
import numpy as np

np.random.seed(42)

c = np.random.rand(4, 4)
G = nx.DiGraph(c)
length = dict(nx.all_pairs_shortest_path_length(G))

R = np.array([[length.get(m, {}).get(n, 0) > 0 for m in G.nodes] for n in G.nodes], dtype=np.int32)

print(R)

Output

[[1 1 1 1 1]
 [0 1 1 1 1]
 [0 0 1 1 1]
 [0 0 0 1 1]
 [0 0 0 0 1]]
2
  • This works - thank you very much; I also had this function in mind but thought there might be some easier way that does not need to calculate the shortest path for each pair of nodes
    – Johannes
    Apr 27 '20 at 11:07
  • Isn't it the transpose of reachability matrix described in the question?
    – Dandelion
    Sep 19 '21 at 10:12
1

One approach could be to find all descendants of each node, and set the corresponding rows that are reachable to 1:

a = np.zeros((len(A.nodes()),)*2)

for node in A.nodes():
    s = list(nx.descendants(A, node))
    a[s, node] = 1

print(a)

array([[0., 0., 1., 0.],
       [1., 0., 1., 0.],
       [0., 0., 0., 0.],
       [1., 1., 1., 0.]])
2
  • Thank you very much, this works also well; The advantage here is that is it much easier to understand what is going on compared to the other example; But in contrary, it is a bit longer; From computation they are probably comparable
    – Johannes
    Apr 27 '20 at 11:20
  • Longer as in more lines of code? Generally speaking, and specially when it comes to involved tasks as this one, readability is very important. So narrowing down to as fewer lines of code as possible at the expense of readability is not advisable. As per the second point not so sure, we'd have to check :) @Johannes
    – yatu
    Apr 27 '20 at 11:25

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