166

I am trying to find a simple example where the enums are shown as is. All examples I have seen tries to add nice looking display strings but I don't want that complexity.

Basically I have a class that holds all the properties that I bind, by first setting the DataContext to this class, and then specifying the binding like this in the xaml file:

<ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding Path=EffectStyle}"/>

But this doesn't show the enum values in the ComboBox as items.

16 Answers 16

279

You can do it from code by placing the following code in Window Loaded event handler, for example:

yourComboBox.ItemsSource = Enum.GetValues(typeof(EffectStyle)).Cast<EffectStyle>();

If you need to bind it in XAML you need to use ObjectDataProvider to create object available as binding source:

<Window x:Class="YourNamespace.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
        xmlns:StyleAlias="clr-namespace:Motion.VideoEffects">
    <Window.Resources>
        <ObjectDataProvider x:Key="dataFromEnum" MethodName="GetValues"
                            ObjectType="{x:Type System:Enum}">
            <ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
                <x:Type TypeName="StyleAlias:EffectStyle"/>
            </ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
        </ObjectDataProvider>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource dataFromEnum}}"
                  SelectedItem="{Binding Path=CurrentEffectStyle}" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

Draw attention on the next code:

xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
xmlns:StyleAlias="clr-namespace:Motion.VideoEffects"

Guide how to map namespace and assembly you can read on MSDN.

  • 1
    Tested example from first link, works OK. See added code and comment in my answer. – Kyrylo M May 26 '11 at 23:02
  • 1
    Found your problem on MSDN forums (social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/wpf/thread/…). Try to clean and rebuild project. Probably you should ask for that problem here on another question. This is the only what I can advice... Anyway, the showed example is correct. – Kyrylo M May 26 '11 at 23:15
  • 1
    Thanks, that's bizarre but I have seen similar stuff with wpf madness. Will do and let you know. Btw is this the same problem described here: social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/wpf/thread/… – Joan Venge May 26 '11 at 23:18
  • 2
    Your need to add reference to it and add xmlns:DllAlias="clr-namespace:NamespaceInsideDll; assembly=DllAssemblyName" in XAML to use it. Here is guide: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms747086.aspx – Kyrylo M May 27 '11 at 0:14
  • 4
    You can use such tools like ReSharper. It parses all referenced assemblies and gives suggestions what need to include. No need to write - just select from the options. – Kyrylo M May 27 '11 at 0:27
102

I like for all objects that I'm binding to be defined in my ViewModel, so I try to avoid using <ObjectDataProvider> in the xaml when possible.

My solution uses no data defined in the View and no code-behind. Only a DataBinding, a reusable ValueConverter, a method to get a collection of descriptions for any Enum type, and a single property in the ViewModel to bind to.

When I want to bind an Enum to a ComboBox the text I want to display never matches the values of the Enum, so I use the [Description()] attribute to give it the text that I actually want to see in the ComboBox. If I had an enum of character classes in a game, it would look something like this:

public enum PlayerClass
{
  // add an optional blank value for default/no selection
  [Description("")]
  NOT_SET = 0,
  [Description("Shadow Knight")]
  SHADOW_KNIGHT,
  ...
}

First I created helper class with a couple methods to deal with enums. One method gets a description for a specific value, the other method gets all values and their descriptions for a type.

public static class EnumHelper
{
  public static string Description(this Enum value)
  {
    var attributes = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString()).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
    if (attributes.Any())
      return (attributes.First() as DescriptionAttribute).Description;

    // If no description is found, the least we can do is replace underscores with spaces
    // You can add your own custom default formatting logic here
    TextInfo ti = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.TextInfo;
    return ti.ToTitleCase(ti.ToLower(value.ToString().Replace("_", " ")));
  }

  public static IEnumerable<ValueDescription> GetAllValuesAndDescriptions(Type t)
  {
    if (!t.IsEnum)
      throw new ArgumentException($"{nameof(t)} must be an enum type");

    return Enum.GetValues(t).Cast<Enum>().Select((e) => new ValueDescription() { Value = e, Description = e.Description() }).ToList();
  }
}

Next, we create a ValueConverter. Inheriting from MarkupExtension makes it easier to use in XAML so we don't have to declare it as a resource.

[ValueConversion(typeof(Enum), typeof(IEnumerable<ValueDescription>))]
public class EnumToCollectionConverter : MarkupExtension, IValueConverter
{
  public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
  {
    return EnumHelper.GetAllValuesAndDescriptions(value.GetType());
  }
  public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
  {
    return null;
  }
  public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
  {
    return this;
  }
}

My ViewModel only needs 1 property that my View can bind to for both the SelectedValue and ItemsSource of the combobox:

private PlayerClass playerClass;

public PlayerClass SelectedClass
{
  get { return playerClass; }
  set
  {
    if (playerClass != value)
    {
      playerClass = value;
      OnPropertyChanged(nameof(SelectedClass));
    }
  }
}

And finally to bind the ComboBox view (using the ValueConverter in the ItemsSource binding)...

<ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding Path=SelectedClass, Converter={x:EnumToCollectionConverter}, Mode=OneTime}"
          SelectedValuePath="Value"
          DisplayMemberPath="Description"
          SelectedValue="{Binding Path=SelectedClass}" />

To implement this solution you only need to copy my EnumHelper class and EnumToCollectionConverter class. They will work with any enums. Also, I didn't include it here, but the ValueDescription class is just a simple class with 2 public object properties, one called Value, one called Description. You can create that yourself or you can change the code to use a Tuple<object, object> or KeyValuePair<object, object>

  • 5
    To make this work, I had to create a ValueDescription class which has public properties for Value and Description – Perchik May 15 '15 at 19:17
  • 3
    Yes, you can also change this code to use a Tuple<T1, T2> or or KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> instead of the ValueDescription class and then you wouldn't have to create your own. – Nick May 18 '15 at 13:16
  • I needed to implement OnPropertyChanged (or the equivalent) for both ViewModel properties, not just SelectedClass. – Will Apr 19 '16 at 20:32
  • You shouldn't need to implement OnPropertyChanged for the property that returns the list. The list is generated from the values in an Enum. It will never change during run time, and when it never changes, it never needs to notify anyone that it has changed. Also, with the updated version, the list property isn't even needed at all. – Nick Apr 19 '16 at 20:34
  • How is the combobox's ItemSource and SelectedValue the same property. Doesn't the ItemsSource need to be a list? Oh, I see, it's bcuase the EnumHelper makes a list of objects. this actually makes my ViewModel simpler since I don't have to maintain a separate list of objects to populate the ItemSource. – Stealth Rabbi Mar 7 '17 at 18:51
45

I used another solution using MarkupExtension.

  1. I made class which provides items source:

    public class EnumToItemsSource : MarkupExtension
    {
        private readonly Type _type;
    
        public EnumToItemsSource(Type type)
        {
            _type = type;
        }
    
        public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
        {
            return Enum.GetValues(_type)
                .Cast<object>()
                .Select(e => new { Value = (int)e, DisplayName = e.ToString() });
        }
    }
    
  2. That's almost all... Now use it in XAML:

        <ComboBox DisplayMemberPath="DisplayName"
              ItemsSource="{persons:EnumToItemsSource {x:Type enums:States}}"
              SelectedValue="{Binding Path=WhereEverYouWant}"
              SelectedValuePath="Value" />
    
  3. Change 'enums:States' to your enum

  • 1
    @Nick : Accepted answer is referencing enum (or model as you said) in xaml too. Your solution is creating 2 properties and backing field in view model, which I didn't like (DRY rule). And of course, you don't have to use e.ToString() for display name. You can use your own translator, descrtiption attribute parser, whatever. – tom.maruska Sep 13 '15 at 9:03
  • 2
    @tom.maruska I'm not trying to get into my answer vs your answer, but since you brought it up, having 2 properties does not violate DRY rule when they are 2 distinct properties that serve different purposes. And your answer would also require adding a property (you even called out this property yourself {Binding Path=WhereEverYouWant}) and if you want it to support 2-way binding you're going to have a backing field for it, too. So you're not replacing 2 properties and 1 backing field by doing this, you're only replacing 1 single-line readonly property. – Nick Sep 14 '15 at 17:16
  • @Nick Yes, you are right about that property and backing field :) – tom.maruska Sep 14 '15 at 17:31
21

Use ObjectDataProvider:

<ObjectDataProvider x:Key="enumValues"
   MethodName="GetValues" ObjectType="{x:Type System:Enum}">
      <ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
           <x:Type TypeName="local:ExampleEnum"/>
      </ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
 </ObjectDataProvider>

and then bind to static resource:

ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource enumValues}}"

based on this article

  • 4
    Perfectly simple solution. Namespace for System as in kirmir's answer: xmlns:System="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib" – Jonathan Twite Apr 4 '16 at 11:18
  • Works well in WPF projects of Visual Studio 2017. – Sorush Mar 26 at 9:54
9

Nick's answer has really helped me, but I realised it could be tweaked slightly, to avoid an extra class, ValueDescription. I remembered that there exists a KeyValuePair class already in the framework, so this can be used instead.

The code changes only slightly :

public static IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>> GetAllValuesAndDescriptions<TEnum>() where TEnum : struct, IConvertible, IComparable, IFormattable
    {
        if (!typeof(TEnum).IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("TEnum must be an Enumeration type");
        }

        return from e in Enum.GetValues(typeof(TEnum)).Cast<Enum>()
               select new KeyValuePair<string, string>(e.ToString(),  e.Description());
    }


public IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<string, string>> PlayerClassList
{
   get
   {
       return EnumHelper.GetAllValuesAndDescriptions<PlayerClass>();
   }
}

and finally the XAML :

<ComboBox ItemSource="{Binding Path=PlayerClassList}"
          DisplayMemberPath="Value"
          SelectedValuePath="Key"
          SelectedValue="{Binding Path=SelectedClass}" />

I hope this is helpful to others.

8

You'll need to create an array of the values in the enum, which can be created by calling System.Enum.GetValues(), passing it the Type of the enum that you want the items of.

If you specify this for the ItemsSource property, then it should be populated with all of the enum's values. You probably want to bind SelectedItem to EffectStyle (assuming it is a property of the same enum, and contains the current value).

  • Thanks, can you show the first part in code please? I am not sure where to store the enum values as array? The enum property is located in another class. Can I do this GetValues step inside xaml? – Joan Venge May 26 '11 at 22:46
4

All the above posts have missed a simple trick. It is possible from the binding of SelectedValue to find out how to populate the ItemsSource AUTOMAGICALLY so that your XAML markup is just.

<Controls:EnumComboBox SelectedValue="{Binding Fool}"/>

For example in my ViewModel I have

public enum FoolEnum
    {
        AAA, BBB, CCC, DDD

    };


    FoolEnum _Fool;
    public FoolEnum Fool
    {
        get { return _Fool; }
        set { ValidateRaiseAndSetIfChanged(ref _Fool, value); }
    }

ValidateRaiseAndSetIfChanged is my INPC hook. Yours may differ.

The implementation of EnumComboBox is as follows but first I'll need a little helper to get my enumeration strings and values

    public static List<Tuple<object, string, int>> EnumToList(Type t)
    {
        return Enum
            .GetValues(t)
            .Cast<object>()
            .Select(x=>Tuple.Create(x, x.ToString(), (int)x))
            .ToList();
    }

and the main class ( Note I'm using ReactiveUI for hooking property changes via WhenAny )

using ReactiveUI;
using ReactiveUI.Utils;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Reactive.Linq;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Documents;

namespace My.Controls
{
    public class EnumComboBox : System.Windows.Controls.ComboBox
    {
        static EnumComboBox()
        {
            DefaultStyleKeyProperty.OverrideMetadata(typeof(EnumComboBox), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(typeof(EnumComboBox)));
        }

        protected override void OnInitialized( EventArgs e )
        {
            base.OnInitialized(e);

            this.WhenAnyValue(p => p.SelectedValue)
                .Where(p => p != null)
                .Select(o => o.GetType())
                .Where(t => t.IsEnum)
                .DistinctUntilChanged()
                .ObserveOn(RxApp.MainThreadScheduler)
                .Subscribe(FillItems);
        }

        private void FillItems(Type enumType)
        {
            List<KeyValuePair<object, string>> values = new List<KeyValuePair<object,string>>();

            foreach (var idx in EnumUtils.EnumToList(enumType))
            {
                values.Add(new KeyValuePair<object, string>(idx.Item1, idx.Item2));
            }

            this.ItemsSource = values.Select(o=>o.Key.ToString()).ToList();

            UpdateLayout();
            this.ItemsSource = values;
            this.DisplayMemberPath = "Value";
            this.SelectedValuePath = "Key";

        }
    }
}

You also need to set the style correctly in Generic.XAML or your box won't render anything and you will pull your hair out.

<Style TargetType="{x:Type local:EnumComboBox}" BasedOn="{StaticResource {x:Type ComboBox}}">
</Style>

and that is that. This could obviously be extended to support i18n but would make the post longer.

2
public class EnumItemsConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (!value.GetType().IsEnum)
            return false;

        var enumName = value.GetType();
        var obj = Enum.Parse(enumName, value.ToString());

        return System.Convert.ToInt32(obj);
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return Enum.ToObject(targetType, System.Convert.ToInt32(value));
    }
}

You should extend Rogers and Greg's answer with such kind of Enum value converter, if you're binding straight to enum object model properties.

2

Universal apps seem to work a bit differently; it doesn't have all the power of full-featured XAML. What worked for me is:

  1. I created a list of the enum values as the enums (not converted to strings or to integers) and bound the ComboBox ItemsSource to that
  2. Then I could bind the ComboBox ItemSelected to my public property whose type is the enum in question

Just for fun I whipped up a little templated class to help with this and published it to the MSDN Samples pages. The extra bits let me optionally override the names of the enums and to let me hide some of the enums. My code looks an awful like like Nick's (above), which I wish I had seen earlier.

Running the sample; it includes multiple twoway bindings to the enum

2

There are many excellent answers to this question and I humbly submit mine. I find that mine is somewhat simpler and more elegant. It requires only a value converter.

Given an enum...

public enum ImageFormat
{
    [Description("Windows Bitmap")]
    BMP,
    [Description("Graphics Interchange Format")]
    GIF,
    [Description("Joint Photographic Experts Group Format")]
    JPG,
    [Description("Portable Network Graphics Format")]
    PNG,
    [Description("Tagged Image Format")]
    TIFF,
    [Description("Windows Media Photo Format")]
    WDP
}

and a value converter...

public class ImageFormatValueConverter : IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (value is ImageFormat format)
        {
            return GetString(format);
        }

        return null;
    }

    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        if (value is string s)
        {
            return Enum.Parse(typeof(ImageFormat), s.Substring(0, s.IndexOf(':')));
        }
        return null;
    }

    public string[] Strings => GetStrings();

    public static string GetString(ImageFormat format)
    {
        return format.ToString() + ": " + GetDescription(format);
    }

    public static string GetDescription(ImageFormat format)
    {
        return format.GetType().GetMember(format.ToString())[0].GetCustomAttribute<DescriptionAttribute>().Description;

    }
    public static string[] GetStrings()
    {
        List<string> list = new List<string>();
        foreach (ImageFormat format in Enum.GetValues(typeof(ImageFormat)))
        {
            list.Add(GetString(format));
        }

        return list.ToArray();
    }
}

resources...

    <local:ImageFormatValueConverter x:Key="ImageFormatValueConverter"/>

XAML declaration...

    <ComboBox Grid.Row="9" ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource ImageFormatValueConverter}, Path=Strings}"
              SelectedItem="{Binding Format, Converter={StaticResource ImageFormatValueConverter}}"/>

View model...

    private ImageFormat _imageFormat = ImageFormat.JPG;
    public ImageFormat Format
    {
        get => _imageFormat;
        set
        {
            if (_imageFormat != value)
            {
                _imageFormat = value;
                OnPropertyChanged();
            }
        }
    }

Resulting combobox...

ComboBox bound to enum

  • For me, this is the best solution to the question: simple, easy to understand, straightforward to implement. – Informagic Jan 17 at 20:34
1

If you are binding to an actual enum property on your ViewModel, not a int representation of an enum, things get tricky. I found it is necessary to bind to the string representation, NOT the int value as is expected in all of the above examples.

You can tell if this is the case by binding a simple textbox to the property you want to bind to on your ViewModel. If it shows text, bind to the string. If it shows a number, bind to the value. Note I have used Display twice which would normally be an error, but it's the only way it works.

<ComboBox SelectedValue="{Binding ElementMap.EdiDataType, Mode=TwoWay}"
                      DisplayMemberPath="Display"
                      SelectedValuePath="Display"
                      ItemsSource="{Binding Source={core:EnumToItemsSource {x:Type edi:EdiDataType}}}" />

Greg

  • This answer seems incomplete: * What is /core/? – trapicki Mar 28 '14 at 10:34
1

I liked tom.maruska's answer, but I needed to support any enum type which my template might encounter at runtime. For that, I had to use a binding to specify the type to the markup extension. I was able to work in this answer from nicolay.anykienko to come up with a very flexible markup extension which would work in any case I can think of. It is consumed like this:

<ComboBox SelectedValue="{Binding MyEnumProperty}" 
          SelectedValuePath="Value"
          ItemsSource="{local:EnumToObjectArray SourceEnum={Binding MyEnumProperty}}" 
          DisplayMemberPath="DisplayName" />

The source for the mashed up markup extension referenced above:

class EnumToObjectArray : MarkupExtension
{
    public BindingBase SourceEnum { get; set; }

    public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
    {
        IProvideValueTarget target = serviceProvider.GetService(typeof(IProvideValueTarget)) as IProvideValueTarget;
        DependencyObject targetObject;
        DependencyProperty targetProperty;

        if (target != null && target.TargetObject is DependencyObject && target.TargetProperty is DependencyProperty)
        {
            targetObject = (DependencyObject)target.TargetObject;
            targetProperty = (DependencyProperty)target.TargetProperty;
        }
        else
        {
            return this;
        }

        BindingOperations.SetBinding(targetObject, EnumToObjectArray.SourceEnumBindingSinkProperty, SourceEnum);

        var type = targetObject.GetValue(SourceEnumBindingSinkProperty).GetType();

        if (type.BaseType != typeof(System.Enum)) return this;

        return Enum.GetValues(type)
            .Cast<Enum>()
            .Select(e => new { Value=e, Name = e.ToString(), DisplayName = Description(e) });
    }

    private static DependencyProperty SourceEnumBindingSinkProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("SourceEnumBindingSink", typeof(Enum)
                       , typeof(EnumToObjectArray), new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.Inherits));

    /// <summary>
    /// Extension method which returns the string specified in the Description attribute, if any.  Oherwise, name is returned.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The enum value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string Description(Enum value)
    {
        var attrs = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString()).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
        if (attrs.Any())
            return (attrs.First() as DescriptionAttribute).Description;

        //Fallback
        return value.ToString().Replace("_", " ");
    }
}
1

Simple and clear explanation: http://brianlagunas.com/a-better-way-to-data-bind-enums-in-wpf/

xmlns:local="clr-namespace:BindingEnums"
xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"

...

<Window.Resources>
    <ObjectDataProvider x:Key="dataFromEnum" MethodName="GetValues"
                        ObjectType="{x:Type sys:Enum}">
        <ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
            <x:Type TypeName="local:Status"/>
        </ObjectDataProvider.MethodParameters>
    </ObjectDataProvider>
</Window.Resources>

...

<Grid>
    <ComboBox HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" MinWidth="150"
              ItemsSource="{Binding Source={StaticResource dataFromEnum}}"/>
</Grid>
0

Using ReactiveUI, I've created the following alternate solution. It's not an elegant all-in-one solution, but I think at the very least it's readable.

In my case, binding a list of enum to a control is a rare case, so I don't need to scale the solution across the code base. However, the code can be made more generic by changing EffectStyleLookup.Item into an Object. I tested it with my code, no other modifications are necessary. Which means the one helper class could be applied to any enum list. Though that would reduce its readability - ReactiveList<EnumLookupHelper> doesn't have a great ring to it.

Using the following helper class:

public class EffectStyleLookup
{
    public EffectStyle Item { get; set; }
    public string Display { get; set; }
}

In the ViewModel, convert the list of enums and expose it as a property:

public ViewModel : ReactiveObject
{
  private ReactiveList<EffectStyleLookup> _effectStyles;
  public ReactiveList<EffectStyleLookup> EffectStyles
  {
    get { return _effectStyles; }
    set { this.RaiseAndSetIfChanged(ref _effectStyles, value); }
  }

  // See below for more on this
  private EffectStyle _selectedEffectStyle;
  public EffectStyle SelectedEffectStyle
  {
    get { return _selectedEffectStyle; }
    set { this.RaiseAndSetIfChanged(ref _selectedEffectStyle, value); }
  }

  public ViewModel() 
  {
    // Convert a list of enums into a ReactiveList
    var list = (IList<EffectStyle>)Enum.GetValues(typeof(EffectStyle))
      .Select( x => new EffectStyleLookup() { 
        Item = x, 
        Display = x.ToString()
      });

    EffectStyles = new ReactiveList<EffectStyle>( list );
  }
}

In the ComboBox, utilise the SelectedValuePath property, to bind to the original enum value:

<ComboBox Name="EffectStyle" DisplayMemberPath="Display" SelectedValuePath="Item" />

In the View, this allows us to bind the original enum to the SelectedEffectStyle in the ViewModel, but display the ToString() value in the ComboBox:

this.WhenActivated( d =>
{
  d( this.OneWayBind(ViewModel, vm => vm.EffectStyles, v => v.EffectStyle.ItemsSource) );
  d( this.Bind(ViewModel, vm => vm.SelectedEffectStyle, v => v.EffectStyle.SelectedValue) );
});
  • I think your ViewModel has an error. 1) Shouldn't it be a ReactiveList of EffectStyleLookup?, 2) You should make an empty ReactiveList<T>() first. Then add the items. Finally: ReactiveList<T> is now deprecated (but still works). EffectStyles = new ReactiveList<EffectStyleLookup>(); EffectStyles.AddRange(list); Thanks for taking the time to show this. – user1040323 Feb 26 at 11:57
0

I'm adding my comment (in VB, sadly, but the concept can be easily replicated over to C# in a heartbeat), because I just had to reference this and didn't like any of the answers as they were too complex. It shouldn't have to be this difficult.

So I came up with an easier way. Bind the Enumerators to a Dictionary. Bind that dictionary to the Combobox.

My combobox:

<ComboBox x:Name="cmbRole" VerticalAlignment="Stretch" IsEditable="False" Padding="2" 
    Margin="0" FontSize="11" HorizontalAlignment="Stretch" TabIndex="104" 
    SelectedValuePath="Key" DisplayMemberPath="Value" />

My code-behind. Hopefully, this helps someone else out.

Dim tDict As New Dictionary(Of Integer, String)
Dim types = [Enum].GetValues(GetType(Helper.Enumerators.AllowedType))
For Each x As Helper.Enumerators.AllowedType In types
    Dim z = x.ToString()
    Dim y = CInt(x)
    tDict.Add(y, z)
Next

cmbRole.ClearValue(ItemsControl.ItemsSourceProperty)
cmbRole.ItemsSource = tDict
  • Kyrylo's answer is much simpler than yours - I don't understand what's complicated about it? His requires zero conversion in code. – Johnathon Sullinger Nov 17 '16 at 22:46
  • I didn't want to place all my logic into the hands of XAML. I prefer to do my logic my way (not always the best way), but it allows me to understand where and why something isn't going according to plan. His is less complicated, but relies on XAML/WPF to do the logic. I'm just not a fan of that. 10,000 ways to skin a cat, you know? – Laki Politis Nov 23 '16 at 16:44
  • Fair enough. I personally prefer to use features already built, out of the box, for me but that's just my preference ;) To each there own! – Johnathon Sullinger Nov 23 '16 at 19:37
  • Yessir! I completely understand. I've been forced into Software development coming from web development. I haven't been as up-to-date on WPF and had to learn alot as I've gone along. I still don't understand all the intricacies of the WPF/XAML controls, and so I've been finding more hiccups than solutions in how I would expect things to work. But I appreciate this conversation. It's made me do some more research. – Laki Politis Nov 24 '16 at 3:50
0

Nick's solutuion can be simplified more, with nothing fancy, you would only need a single converter:

[ValueConversion(typeof(Enum), typeof(IEnumerable<Enum>))]
public class EnumToCollectionConverter : MarkupExtension, IValueConverter
{
    public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        var r = Enum.GetValues(value.GetType());
        return r;
    }
    public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
    {
        return null;
    }
    public override object ProvideValue(IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
    {
        return this;
    }
}

You then use this wherever you want your combo box to appear:

<ComboBox ItemsSource="{Binding PagePosition, Converter={converter:EnumToCollectionConverter}, Mode=OneTime}"  SelectedItem="{Binding PagePosition}" />

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