5

I have a section in my code where I am querying all SQL Server Databases on my network. I am first trying to use a SQL Login to access the SQL Server Instance but if that fails then I want to try connecting using my Windows Credentials. After that if I still can't connect then I want the code to fail and then notify the user.

So I guess what I am asking is how can I loop back from inside of a Try-Catch block to the line just above the Try-Catch block:

String conxString = @"Data Source=SQLInstance1;User ID=FOO;Password=BAR;";
bool secondTime = false;

using (SqlConnection sqlConx = new SqlConnection(conxString))
     {
         Try{
               sqlConx.Open();
               DataTable tblDatabases = sqlConx.GetSchema("Databases");
               sqlConx.Close();
               secondTime = false;
               Console.WriteLine("SQL Server found!");
         }
         Catch(System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException e){
                if (!secondTime){
                   secondTime = true;
                   conxString = @"Data Source=SQLInstance1; Integrated Security=True;";
                      //Loop back to the using statement to try again with Windows Creds
                {
                 else{
                   Console.WriteLine("SQL Server not found or credentials refused");
                 }
                   //Report Failure to connect to user

         }
         finally{
            //Reset Variable
            secondTime = false;
         }

      }
  • @Abe - That is why I added the secondTime flag, this way it will only loop once. – Mark Kram May 26 '11 at 23:32
  • Ahh missed that. – Abe Miessler May 26 '11 at 23:33
  • 2
    Just a general comment, most of the developers I know would object to using an exception for code forking. An exception should present or log an error message, then leave the code that erred. Putting productivity code in a catch block is really mixing up areas of concern. – EoRaptor013 May 27 '11 at 0:37
  • @EoRaptor013 - Great point! – Mark Kram May 27 '11 at 3:21
11

I would probably go this route:

String conxString = @"Data Source=Instance1;User ID=FOO;Password=BAR;";
//in your main function
if(!TryConnect(conxString))
{
   Console.WriteLine("SQL Creditials failed.  Trying with windows credentials...");
   conxString = "new conn string";
   TryConnect(conxString);
}
..............
//new function outside of your main function
private bool TryConnect(string connString)
{
   using (SqlConnection sqlConx = new SqlConnection(conxString))
     {
         Try{
               sqlConx.Open();
               DataTable tblDatabases = sqlConx.GetSchema("Databases");
               sqlConx.Close();
         }
         Catch(System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException e){
                return false;
         }
         return true;    
      }
}
  • I never would have thought of that, great idea! – Mark Kram May 26 '11 at 23:39
  • I would say this is the best answer here. It is simple, effective, and it solves the presented problem. – IAmTimCorey May 27 '11 at 0:48
  • After looking at this solution, I can see that this is a better solution than using GoTo. Thanks Everyone for you suggestions and comments. – Mark Kram May 27 '11 at 18:10
5

You can use a for loop combined with break when you succeed:

for (int attempt = 1; attempt <= 2; attempt++)
{
    try
    {
        /* perform attempt */
        var success = TryToConnect();
        if (success)
            break;
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        /* report error */
    }
}

You can also record whether you succeeded, etc. or increase the number of attempts or make the number of attempts configurable.

  • 2
    +1 for answer. Always start index from zero for (int attempt = 0; attempt < 2; attempt++). ` – Xaqron May 26 '11 at 23:44
  • @Xaqron: The reason I chose to use a one-based variable is so that later on in the code we can say if (attempt == 2) to mean in English is this the second attempt?. But I agree that zero-based is a sensible choice as well. – Rick Sladkey May 26 '11 at 23:48
  • 2
    I think, however, the object was to change connection strings between attempts, yes? – EoRaptor013 May 27 '11 at 0:31
  • @EoRaptor013: Sorry, my pseudo-code does not make clear that the variable attempt can be used to alter the connection attempt. My previous comment describes how to do that by using attempt == 2 in place of secondTime when that code is pasted over the pseudo-code. – Rick Sladkey May 27 '11 at 1:14
-1

This blog post (albeit from 2005) shows possible solutions for your problem:

Use Goto

TryLabel:
try
{
    downloadMgr.DownLoadFile("file:///server/file", "c:\\file");
    Console.WriteLine("File successfully downloaded");
}
catch (NetworkException ex)
{
    if (ex.OkToRetry)
        goto TryLabel;
}

Write a Wrapper

public static bool Wrapper(DownloadManager downloadMgr)
{
    try
    {
        downloadMgr.DownLoadFile("file:///server/file", "c:\\file");
        return true;
    }

    catch (NetworkException ex)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Failed to download file: {0}", ex.Message);
        return (!ex.OkToRetry);
    } 
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    while (!Wrapper(downloadMgr)) ;
}
  • 1
    Doesn't "goto" just bring back fun memories? – tofutim May 26 '11 at 23:39
  • Funny you said this, in my VB6 project I would have done something like Resume TryBlockAgain: or something to that effect. – Mark Kram May 26 '11 at 23:43
  • 2
    I'm sorry but I still scream in pain whenever I see a goto in modern code. – IAmTimCorey May 26 '11 at 23:48
  • 2
    How did the use of GoTo get marked the best answer??? GoTo is an affront to all my programming sensibilities. Seriously, Stack-O needs to set a 24-hr time-minimum before authors can mark answers as correct. – MikeTeeVee May 27 '11 at 0:38
  • @MikeTeeVee - this was a quick and dirty app that I needed to write so that I could search over 250 different SQL Server instances for a particular database. While it may not be pretty, it did what it was designed to do and I was able to find the server I was looking for. – Mark Kram May 27 '11 at 3:20

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