1

Some commands write insignificant warnings to stderr but return exit status 0.

Is there a way to check that the command exit status is 0 and stderr is empty, without creating temporary files and with a single statement?

4 Answers 4

3

I suggest:

stderr=$(your_command 2>&1 >/dev/null)
[[ $? == 0 ]] && [[ ${#stderr} == 0 ]] && echo okay
3
  • >/dev/null 2>&1 - well, it's just doing 2>/dev/null, no?
    – KamilCuk
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 20:47
  • 1
    @KamilCuk: Yeah, I missed that. I've updated my answer.
    – Cyrus
    Commented Apr 27, 2020 at 20:57
  • 2
    The exit status of the assignment to stderr is the exit status of your_command; you can fold the two together: stderr=$(...) && [[ ${#stderr} == 0 }} && echo okay.
    – chepner
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 0:54
2

Because of how set -o pipefail works, you can grab stderr in a pipe and exit with nonzero exit status from the pipe if there's anything on stderr. So basically pipefail does the binary and-ing or exit status - if the command exits with nonzero exit status, pipefail fails the pipe with this status, if the command exits with zero exit status, then the right side of the pipe will fail with nonzero exit status so the whole pipe will exit with nonzero exit status.

# Usage: exit_if_nonzero_or_stderr command [args...]
# Executes the command [args...] and 
# exits with nonzero exit status
# if the command exits with nonzero exit status
# __or__
# the command outputs anything on stderr.
exit_if_nonzero_or_stderr() {
        (       
                set -o pipefail
                { "$@" 1>&3 ;} 2>&1 | {
                        if IFS= read -r line; then
                                printf "%s\n" "$line"
                                cat 
                                exit 1
                        fi
                } >&2
        ) 3>&1
}

Tested against all combinations:

tester() { 
        for i in \
                'echo 1; true;' \
                'echo 1; false;' \
                'echo 1; echo 2 >&2; true;' \
                'echo 1; echo 2 >&2; false;'
        do
                eval "f() { $i }"
                set -o pipefail
                exit_if_nonzero_or_stderr f 2> >( \
                        sed 's/^/stderr: /' >&2) | 
                        sed 's/^/stdout: /';
                echo "f() { $i } -> exit status: $?";
        done
}
tester

The tester outputs:

stdout: 1
f() { echo 1; true; } -> exit status: 0
stdout: 1
f() { echo 1; false; } -> exit status: 1
stderr: 2
stdout: 1
f() { echo 1; echo 2 >&2; true; } -> exit status: 1
stdout: 1
stderr: 2
f() { echo 1; echo 2 >&2; false; } -> exit status: 1

Alternative implementation and a little more verbose and more memory consuming but more posix-ish you could grab stderr to a variable and check if it's nonzero:

exit_if_nonzero_or_stderr2() {
        local stderr ret
        # redirect stdout to output with temporary file descriptor
        # and grab stderr 
        { stderr=$({ "$@" 1>&3 ;} 2>&1 ) ;} 3>&1
        # remember return value
        ret=$?
        # if theres anything on stderr, output it
        if [[ -n "$stderr" ]]; then
                cat <<<"$stderr" >&2
                # if stderr, always nonzero
                return 1
        fi
        # else we return with the exit status of the command
        return "$ret"
}
0

Hope below is helpful.

 res=$(./test.out 2 >&1)
 if [ $? -eq 0 ];then
    stdout=$res
    echo $stdout
 else
    return_code=$?
    std_err=$res
    echo $stderr 
 fi

Corresponding test.c file in C

   #include <stdio.h>
   int main ( ) {
       printf( "hello " );
       fprintf( stderr, "HELP!" );
       printf( " world\n" );
       return 1;
   }
1
  • there are several issue with this.. res=$(./test.out 2 >&1) includes both stdout and stderr. and also there is no test of stderr length
    – vstepaniuk
    Commented Apr 29, 2020 at 11:56
0

Thanks @Cyrus and @chepner for the comments:

if stderr=$(command 2>&1 >/dev/null) && test -z "$stderr"; then echo "ok"; fi

The stderr of the command 2>&1 >/dev/null is redirected to where stdout was before, and stdout itself is redirected to /dev/null. Then the stderr is assigned to the stderr variable in stderr=$(command 2>&1 >/dev/null), and the exit code of this assignment is the one from just command, so it is utilized in if. Then, if the exit code of command is zero (and only in this case), the second condition (test -z "$stderr") is checked - which is testing if $stderr variable is a zero-length string.

0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.