21

Let's say I have some BaseModel, and I want to check that it's options list is not empty. I can perfectly do it with a validator:

class Trait(BaseModel):
    name: str
    options: List[str]

    @validator("options")
    def options_non_empty(cls, v):
        assert len(v) > 0
        return v

Are there any other, more elegant, way to do this?

1
  • I wasn't that clear: I'm not looking to shrink the size of validator function, I'm looking to find a way not to use it at all.
    – keddad
    Apr 27, 2020 at 21:29

4 Answers 4

46

If you want to use a @validator:

return v if v else doSomething

Python assumes boolean-ess of an empty list as False

If you don't want to use a @validator:

In Pydantic, use conlist:

from pydantic import BaseModel, conlist
from typing import List

class Trait(BaseModel):
    name: str
    options: conlist(str, min_length=1)
2
  • Is return v if v syntactically correct? What am I missing?
    – npk
    Aug 7, 2020 at 13:46
  • it's not, it was meant to imply else someOtherExpression. OP I believe, was interested in my conlist answer. Aug 8, 2020 at 22:46
2

In Python, empty lists are falsey, while lists with any number of elements are truthy:

>>> bool([])
False
>>> bool([1,2,3])
True
>>> bool([False])
True
>>> bool([[]])
True

This means that you can simply assert v or assert Trait.options to confirm that the list is non-empty.

1

As of Python 3.9 and Pydantic v2, the recommended way is to use Annotated types:

# tested with Python 3.9 & Pydantic 2.6

from typing import Annotated
from annotated_types import Len
from pydantic import BaseModel

class Foo(BaseModel):
  my_list: Annotated[list[str], Len(min_length=1)]


ok = Foo(my_list=["bar"])

# this will throw a ValidationError exception
too_few = Foo(my_list=[])

References:

0

Use Field with min_length:

from typing import List
from pydantic import BaseModel, Field

class Trait(BaseModel):
    name: str
    options: List[str] = Field(min_length=1)

min_length is on the string constraints session but still works for lists.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.