3

Let's say I have my own class QueueListener<TService, TPayload> inherited from BackgroundService. It opens TCP connection and listens incoming messages. On each message I would like to initialize service of TService type and pass deserialized from JSON instance of TPayload to it. TService is going to be registered as Transient, so it means to be lightweight and stateless as a handler for payload have to be (in my current task). For this purpose I am going to inject IServiceProvider in constructor of my QueueListener and create a scope on each message it receives. Does it sounds like a plan or am I overengineering? I want to avoid TService is singleton as well.

Documentation says:

It's dangerous to resolve a scoped service from a singleton. It may cause the service to have incorrect state when processing subsequent requests.

But I am not completely sure what does it means. There is no way to inject scoped service in BackgroundService because it has Singleton lifetime. Do they warn me to stop doing things like I do?

UPD #1

I explain why I suppose to create scope on each message. The idea behind that is to prevent listener to be blocked by message processing and to provide other developers possibility to create their own handlers and do some stuff on received message. Other developers can create database connections for instance while processing and I want it to be closed and released when handling is done.

1
  • You did not say why do you think you need a scope? Your TService is registered to have transient lifetime, which does not require a scope.
    – weichch
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 0:09

5 Answers 5

5

Register TService as scoped and create a new scope per message. Then resolve TService from created scope. Just read Consuming a scoped service in a background task

You can write it like this:

services.AddHostedService<MyBackgroundService>();
services.AddScoped<IScopedServicePerMessage, ScopedServicePerMessage>();

...

public class MyBackgroundService : BackgroundService
{
    private readonly IServiceProvider _sp;
    public MyBackgroundService(IServiceProvider sp)
    {
        _sp = sp;
    }

    protected override Task ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken)
    {
        DoWork(stoppingToken);
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    private void DoWork(CancellationToken stoppingToken)
    {
        while(true)
        {
            var msg = GetNextMessage();
            using (var scope = _sp.CreateScope())
            {
                var servicePerMessage = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<IScopedServicePerMessage>();
                servicePerMessage.Handle(msg);
            }
        }
    }
    ...
}

Regarding this:

It's dangerous to resolve a scoped service from a singleton. It may cause the service to have incorrect state when processing subsequent requests.

It's about the case when you inject scoped service (ef core dbcontext, for instance) directly into singleton. It's not your case.

4
  • Hey, thank you for your message. But I can't get reach the reference you've provided.
    – matterai
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:02
  • Ho-ho! That is exactly the case and simultaneously an answer on my question! Thank you so much. Any way weichch and poke helped me to formulate my question completely. Thank you everyone!
    – matterai
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:12
  • I honestly don’t see how this adds anything to the existing answers. The important information, how to create a scope and resolve a service from it, is hidden behing a link which is generally discouraged.
    – poke
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:41
  • @poke This link contains clear information about exactly such case. Is it better to copy it here? Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:55
3

The documentation is referring to injecting a scoped service into a singleton service. Since the injection happens at the construction of the singleton object, the scoped service would be provided at that time. This will effectively increase the lifetime of the scoped service to that of a singleton service. This is dangerous because a scoped service lifetime is often chosen explicitly to ensure that the object gets disposed quickly again.

The most common example would be a database context which owns a database connection; you want to make sure that you free up this database connection as soon as possible to free up the resources. But if you injected the context into a singleton service, it would never get disposed.

That however does not mean that there is no way to consume scoped services within a singleton service. This is done by having the singleton service create a service scope from which it can then retrieve singleton services. It’s important though that this service scope is supposed to be short-lived. So take the example from ASP.NET Core itself, where a service scope is created for every request, and do something similar. For example in your case, you could do it for every incoming message if that makes sense for your application.

To create a service scope, you should inject an IServiceScopeFactory; you can then create a scope with it like this:

public async Task Process(TPayload payload)
{
    using (var scope = _serviceScopeFactory.CreateScope())
    {
        var service = scope.GetService<TService>();

        await service.Process(payload);
    }
}

This pattern is strictly only necessary if you need to consume scoped services. You could resolve all other services directly without creating a scope. If you can reuse the same service instance to process all payloads, you could also inject the service as a singleton (same as registering it as transient but resolving it only once). If you need a fresh instance for every payload, then consider creating a scope even if it isn’t strictly necessary.

4
  • I don't think injecting in the first sentence is good word choice as it may refer to constructor injection, property injection etc. I think resolve would be better choice. Scoped service is cached within the lifetime scope where it is resolved. If scoped service is resolved from singleton service, it is likely the lifetime used to resolve the service is the root scope (the container itself), therefore the service is cached in the container, thus the lifetime of the scoped service is extended.
    – weichch
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 2:29
  • Thank you for your response! Dotnet throws an InvalidOperationException if you trying to resolve scoped service from singleton constructor. So I assume it's not possible to use scoped service except the situation when you create scope by yourself like you described. The reason why I want to create on each message a new scope is to give possibility to write own message handlers for other developers. I suppose it gives them easy and clear way to write their own TService and invoke methods with it asynchronously. So that they will not block their listener but run multiple message processing.
    – matterai
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 8:30
  • @weichch I choose injecting on purpose because when you resolve a service through a service locator, then the resolved service is not automatically bound to the lifetime of the caller. And my example here shows how to resolve a scoped service within a singleton service without binding the lifetime to the parent component; by going through a different (scoped) service provider.
    – poke
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 8:49
  • 1
    @matterai Yes, the exception is a validation mechanism, that is enabled by default, which will detect scoped dependencies on singletons. If you disable that validation, then it would be possible to inject scoped services but that won’t change that the resolved service then no longer has a scoped lifetime. So yes, creating an explicit scope is the correct thing to do here.
    – poke
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 8:51
3

I don't wanted my singleton class depending on the IServiceProvider directly. So I've used a custom factory to accomplish this goal. May this code example help others:

public class Startup
{
    // ...

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddScoped<IScopedBar, ScopedBar>();

        services.AddSingleton<IScopedServiceFactory<IScopedBar>, ScopedServiceFactory<IScopedBar>>(
            (provider) => {
                var scope = provider.CreateScope();
                var service = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<IScopedBar>();
                
                return new ScopedServiceFactory<IScopedBar>(() => new ScopedService<IScopedBar>(scope, service));
            });

        services.AddSingleton<ISingletonFoo, SingletonFoo>();
    }

    // ...
}

public interface ISingletonFoo
{
    void DoSomethingUsingScopedServices();
}

public class SingletonFoo : ISingletonFoo
{
    private readonly IScopedServiceFactory<IScopedBar> _barFactory;

    public SingletonFoo(IScopedServiceFactory<IScopedBar> barFactory)
    {
        _barFactory = barFactory;
    }

    public void DoSomethingUsingScopedServices()
    {
        using var scopedService = _barFactory.CreateService();
        scopedService.Service.DoSomething();
    }
}

public interface IScopedBar
{
    void DoSomething();
}

public class ScopedBar : IScopedBar
{
    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

public interface IScopedService<T> : IDisposable
{
    T Service { get; }
}

public interface IScopedServiceFactory<T>
{
    IScopedService<T> CreateService();
}

public class ScopedService<T> : IScopedService<T>
{
    private readonly IDisposable _scope;
    
    public ScopedService(IDisposable scope, T service)
    {
        _scope = scope;
        Service = service;
    }

    public T Service { get; }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _scope.Dispose();
    }
}

public class ScopedServiceFactory<T> : IScopedServiceFactory<T>
{
    private readonly Func<IScopedService<T>> _serviceFactory;

    public ScopedServiceFactory(Func<IScopedService<T>> serviceFactory)
    {
        _serviceFactory = serviceFactory;
    }

    public IScopedService<T> CreateService()
    {
        return _serviceFactory();
    }
}
2

First, transient services are not scoped services. Transient services are usually externally owned by your code and are created each time they are resolved from the container. Container does not cache transient services.

TService is going to be registered as Transient ... For this purpose I am going to inject IServiceProvider in constructor of my QueueListener and create a scope on each message it receives.

You do not need a scope for resolving transient services. Even if you create a scope, the scope still does not manage / own transient services. That, for example, ending the lifetime of the scope does not end lifetime of transient services.

You could simply use the IServiceProvider injected in QueueListener to resolve TService. And each TService resolved should be already like what you want

lightweight and stateless as a handler for payload

With regards to

Documentation says:

What the document says might not be relevant now since you are not using scoped services. But in case you want to know the reason:

It's dangerous to resolve a scoped service from a singleton.

Singleton is a special kind of scope. Singleton services are created and cached within a "root" scope of the container, which is essentially the container itself.

If you resolve scoped service from singleton, the lifetime / scope where the service instance is resolved and cached is likely to be the "root" scope. This leads to a problem where the scoped service instance being cached inside the container, and shared across multiple client requests.

This is dangerous, because scoped services are supposed to be

Scoped lifetime services (AddScoped) are created once per client request (connection).

3
  • Thank you for your reply. First of all, I've appended my post with some new information regarding my suggestion why do I need a scope. You wrote that I can use IServiceProvider to resolve TService as whatever I want. It's not completely true as I assume because dotnet throws InvalidOperationException if TService registered as scoped service. It should be registered as singleton as QueueListener it runs from.
    – matterai
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 8:48
  • My answer is based on your original question where you said TService is going to be registered as Transient. To resolve only transient services, you do not need a scope. But your update now makes more sense as if TService has dependent scoped services, then you need a scope.
    – weichch
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:04
  • 1
    In this case, @poke's answer is what you are looking for.
    – weichch
    Commented Apr 28, 2020 at 9:12
1

Here is my code to consume scoped service:

public interface IScopedResolver<T> where T: class
{
    TResult Resolve<TResult>(Func<T, TResult> dataFactory);

    Task<TResult> ResolveAsync<TResult>(Func<T, Task<TResult>> dataFactory);
}

Implement class:

public class ScopedResolver<T> : IScopeResolver<T> where T: class
{
    private readonly IServiceProvider _provider;

    public ScopedResolver(IServiceProvider provider)
    {
        _provider = provider;
    }

    public TResult Resolve<TResult>(Func<T, TResult> dataFactory)
    {
        using IServiceScope scope = _provider.CreateScope();
        var service = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<T>();
        return dataFactory(service);
    }

    public async Task<TResult> ResolveAsync<TResult>(Func<T, Task<TResult>> dataFactory)
    {
        using var scope = _provider.CreateScope();
        var service = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<T>();
        return await dataFactory(service);
    }
}

Register at startup:

services.AddSingleton(typeof(IScopedResolver<>), typeof(ScopedResolver<>));

using ScopedResolve:

public class ServiceA
{
    private readonly IScopedResolver<DbContext> _context;

    public ServiceA(IScopedResolver<DbContext> context)
    {
        _context = context;
    }

    public async Task<List<ClassOne>> GetListAsync()
    {
        return await _context.ResolveAsync(async s => await s.Set<ClassOne>().ToListAsync());
    }
}

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