21

I Have added JWT Authentication using Auth0 to my Spring Boot REST API following this example.

Now, as expected, my previously working Controller unit tests give a response code of401 Unauthorized rather than 200 OK as I am not passing any JWT in the tests.

How can I mock the JWT/Authentication part of my REST Controller tests?

Unit test class:

    @AutoConfigureMockMvc
    public class UserRoundsControllerTest extends AbstractUnitTests {

        private static String STUB_USER_ID = "user3";
        private static String STUB_ROUND_ID = "7e3b270222252b2dadd547fb";

        @Autowired
        private MockMvc mockMvc;

        private Round round;

        private ObjectId objectId;

        @BeforeEach
        public void setUp() {
            initMocks(this);
            round = Mocks.roundOne();
            objectId = Mocks.objectId();
        }

        @Test
        public void shouldGetAllRoundsByUserId() throws Exception {

            // setup
            given(userRoundService.getAllRoundsByUserId(STUB_USER_ID)).willReturn(Collections.singletonList(round));

            // mock the rounds/userId request
            RequestBuilder requestBuilder = Requests.getAllRoundsByUserId(STUB_USER_ID);

            // perform the requests
            MockHttpServletResponse response = mockMvc.perform(requestBuilder)
                .andReturn()
                .getResponse();

            // asserts
            assertNotNull(response);
            assertEquals(HttpStatus.OK.value(), response.getStatus());
        }

        //other tests
}

Requests class (used above):

public class Requests {

    private Requests() {
    }

    public static RequestBuilder getAllRoundsByUserId(String userId) {

        return MockMvcRequestBuilders
            .get("/users/" + userId + "/rounds/")
            .accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
            .contentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON);
    }

}

Spring Securty Config:

/**
 * Configures our application with Spring Security to restrict access to our API endpoints.
 */
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

    @Value("${auth0.audience}")
    private String audience;

    @Value("${spring.security.oauth2.resourceserver.jwt.issuer-uri}")
    private String issuer;

    @Override
    public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        /*
        This is where we configure the security required for our endpoints and setup our app to serve as
        an OAuth2 Resource Server, using JWT validation.
        */

        http.cors().and().csrf().disable().sessionManagement().
            sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS).and().authorizeRequests()
            .mvcMatchers(HttpMethod.GET,"/users/**").authenticated()
            .mvcMatchers(HttpMethod.POST,"/users/**").authenticated()
            .mvcMatchers(HttpMethod.DELETE,"/users/**").authenticated()
            .mvcMatchers(HttpMethod.PUT,"/users/**").authenticated()
            .and()
            .oauth2ResourceServer().jwt();
    }

    @Bean
    JwtDecoder jwtDecoder() {
        /*
        By default, Spring Security does not validate the "aud" claim of the token, to ensure that this token is
        indeed intended for our app. Adding our own validator is easy to do:
        */

        NimbusJwtDecoder jwtDecoder = (NimbusJwtDecoder)
            JwtDecoders.fromOidcIssuerLocation(issuer);

        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> audienceValidator = new AudienceValidator(audience);
        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> withIssuer = JwtValidators.createDefaultWithIssuer(issuer);
        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> withAudience = new DelegatingOAuth2TokenValidator<>(withIssuer, audienceValidator);

        jwtDecoder.setJwtValidator(withAudience);

        return jwtDecoder;
    }


    @Bean
    CorsConfigurationSource corsConfigurationSource() {
        CorsConfiguration configuration = new CorsConfiguration();
        configuration.setAllowedOrigins(Arrays.asList("*"));
        configuration.setAllowedMethods(Arrays.asList("*"));
        configuration.setAllowedHeaders(Arrays.asList("*"));
        configuration.setAllowCredentials(true);
        UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource source = new UrlBasedCorsConfigurationSource();
        source.registerCorsConfiguration("/**", configuration);
        return source;
    }
}

Abstract Unit test class:

@ExtendWith(SpringExtension.class)
@SpringBootTest(
    classes = PokerStatApplication.class,
    webEnvironment = SpringBootTest.WebEnvironment.RANDOM_PORT
)
public abstract class AbstractUnitTests {

   // mock objects etc


}
3

7 Answers 7

15

If I understand correctly your case there is one of the solutions.

In most cases, JwtDecoder bean performs token parsing and validation if the token exists in the request headers.

Example from your configuration:

    @Bean
    JwtDecoder jwtDecoder() {
        /*
        By default, Spring Security does not validate the "aud" claim of the token, to ensure that this token is
        indeed intended for our app. Adding our own validator is easy to do:
        */

        NimbusJwtDecoder jwtDecoder = (NimbusJwtDecoder)
            JwtDecoders.fromOidcIssuerLocation(issuer);

        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> audienceValidator = new AudienceValidator(audience);
        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> withIssuer = JwtValidators.createDefaultWithIssuer(issuer);
        OAuth2TokenValidator<Jwt> withAudience = new DelegatingOAuth2TokenValidator<>(withIssuer, audienceValidator);

        jwtDecoder.setJwtValidator(withAudience);

        return jwtDecoder;
    }

So for the tests, you need to add stub of this bean and also for replacing this bean in spring context, you need the test configuration with it.

It can be some things like this:

@TestConfiguration
public class TestSecurityConfig {

  static final String AUTH0_TOKEN = "token";
  static final String SUB = "sub";
  static final String AUTH0ID = "sms|12345678";

  @Bean
  public JwtDecoder jwtDecoder() {
    // This anonymous class needs for the possibility of using SpyBean in test methods
    // Lambda cannot be a spy with spring @SpyBean annotation
    return new JwtDecoder() {
      @Override
      public Jwt decode(String token) {
        return jwt();
      }
    };
  }

  public Jwt jwt() {

    // This is a place to add general and maybe custom claims which should be available after parsing token in the live system
    Map<String, Object> claims = Map.of(
        SUB, USER_AUTH0ID
    );

    //This is an object that represents contents of jwt token after parsing
    return new Jwt(
        AUTH0_TOKEN,
        Instant.now(),
        Instant.now().plusSeconds(30),
        Map.of("alg", "none"),
        claims
    );
  }

}

For using this configuration in tests just pick up this test security config:

@SpringBootTest(classes = TestSecurityConfig.class)

Also in the test request should be authorization header with a token like Bearer .. something.

Here is an example regarding your configuration:

    public static RequestBuilder getAllRoundsByUserId(String userId) {

        return MockMvcRequestBuilders
            .get("/users/" + userId + "/rounds/")
            .accept(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
            .header(HttpHeaders.AUTHORIZATION, "Bearer token"))
            .contentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON);
    }
4
  • 2
    I think you are missing the @Bean on the JwtDecoder in the TestSecurityConfig. At least I got it working by adding it plus @MissingOnConditionalBean on the real JwtDecoder bean definition.
    – BitfulByte
    Nov 13, 2020 at 15:39
  • How do you use request builder then? Because that is used more or less in @WebMvcTest which you cannot use with @SpringBootTest.
    – Mejmo
    Jan 27, 2021 at 20:36
  • I am getting tokenValue cannot be empty error. any idea ? Dec 16, 2021 at 15:26
  • The answer below using a @MockBean JwtDecoder and setting the test security context .with(SecurityMockMvcRequestPostProcessors.jwt()) is a way better option
    – ch4mp
    Jun 23 at 8:19
4

For others like me, who after gathering information from what seems like a gazillion StackOverlow answers on how to do this, here is the summary of what ultimately worked for me (using Kotlin syntax, but it is applicable to Java as well):

Step 1 - Define a custom JWT decoder to be used in tests

Notice the JwtClaimNames.SUB entry - this is the user name which will ultimately be accessible via authentication.getName() field.

val jwtDecoder = JwtDecoder {
        Jwt(
                "token",
                Instant.now(),
                Instant.MAX,
                mapOf(
                        "alg" to "none"
                ),
                mapOf(
                        JwtClaimNames.SUB to "testUser"
                )
        )
}

Step 2 - Define a TestConfiguration

This class goes in your test folder. We do this to replace real implementation with a stub one which always treats the user as authenticated.

Note that we are not done yet, check Step 3 as well.

@TestConfiguration
class TestAppConfiguration {

    @Bean // important
    fun jwtDecoder() {
        // Initialize JWT decoder as described in step 1
        // ...

        return jwtDecoder
    }

}

Step 3 - Update your primary configuration to avoid bean conflict

Without this change your test and production beans would clash, resulting in a conflict. Adding this line delays the resolution of the bean and lets Spring prioritise test bean over production one.

There is a caveat, however, as this change effectively removes bean conflict protection in production builds for JwtDecoder instances.

@Configuration
class AppConfiguration {

    @Bean
    @ConditionalOnMissingBean // important
    fun jwtDecoder() {
        // Provide decoder as you would usually do
    }

}

Step 4 - Import TestAppConfiguration in your test

This makes sure that your test actually takes TestConfiguration into account.

@SpringBootTest
@Import(TestAppConfiguration::class)
class MyTest {

    // Your tests

}

Step 5 - Add @WithMockUser annotation to your test

You do not really need to provide any arguments to the annotation.

@Test
@WithMockUser
fun myTest() {
    // Test body
}

Step 6 - Provide Authentication header during the test

mockMvc
    .perform(
        post("/endpointUnderTest")
            .header(HttpHeaders.AUTHORIZATION, "Bearer token") // important
    )
    .andExpect(status().isOk)
3

For me, I made it pretty simple.

I don't want to actually check for the JWT token, this can also be mocked.

Have a look at this security config.

@Override
    public void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {

        //@formatter:off
        http
            .cors()
            .and()
            
            .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/api/v1/orders/**")
                .authenticated()
            .and()
            .authorizeRequests()
                .anyRequest()
                .denyAll()
            .and()
            .sessionManagement()
                .sessionCreationPolicy(SessionCreationPolicy.STATELESS)
            
            .and()
            .oauth2ResourceServer()
            .jwt();

Then in my test, I make use of two thing

  • Provide a mock bean for the jwtDecoder
  • Use the SecurityMockMvcRequestPostProcessors to mock the JWT in the request. This is available in the following dependency
         <dependency>
            <groupId>org.springframework.security</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-security-test</artifactId>
            <scope>test</scope>
        </dependency>

And Here is how it's done.

@SpringBootTest
@AutoConfigureMockMvc
public class OrderApiControllerIT {

    @Autowired
    protected MockMvc mockMvc;

    @MockBean
    private JwtDecoder jwtDecoder;
 
    @Test
    void testEndpoint() {

     MvcResult mvcResult = mockMvc.perform(post("/api/v1/orders")
                .with(SecurityMockMvcRequestPostProcessors.jwt())
                .content(jsonString)
                .contentType(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
            )
            .andDo(print())
            .andExpect(status().is2xxSuccessful())
            .andReturn();

}

That's it and it should work.

2
  • Thanks! The @MockBean annotation is super useful!
    – A.L.
    May 9 at 10:33
  • This actually is the best answer. An alternative is @WithMockJwtAuth from github.com/ch4mpy/spring-addons
    – ch4mp
    Jun 23 at 8:14
1

SecurityConfig bean can be loaded conditionally as,

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class SecurityConfig {

  @Bean
  @Profile("!test")
  public WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter securityEnabled() {

    return new WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter() {

      @Override
      protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        // your code goes here
      }

    };
  }

  @Bean
  @Profile("test")
  public WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter securityDisabled() {

    return new WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter() {

      @Override
      protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http.authorizeRequests().anyRequest().permitAll();
      }
    };
  }

}

So this bean won't be initialized in case of test profile. It means now security is disabled and all endpoints are accessible without any authorization header.

Now "test" profile needs to be active in case of running the tests, this can be done as,

@RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
@ActiveProfiles("test")
@WebMvcTest(UserRoundsController.class)
public class UserRoundsControllerTest extends AbstractUnitTests {

// your code goes here

}

Now this test is going to run with profile "test". Further if you want to have any properties related to this test, that can be put under src/test/resources/application-test.properties.

Hope this helps! please let me know otherwise.

Update: Basic idea is to disable security for test profile. In previous code, even after having profile specific bean, default security was getting enabled.

3
  • Sorry this does not seem to work - I have added the code as above and still get the same issue with getting 401 unauthorised. I have added my Abstract unit test class to my question to help.. Apr 29, 2020 at 17:28
  • 1
    I am now getting the following error when I try this: @Order on WebSecurityConfigurers must be unique. Order of 100 was already used on com.ryd.pokerstats.pokerstats.auth.SecurityConfig$$EnhancerBySpringCGLIB$$f1a72b2@baa9ce4, so it cannot be used on com.ryd.pokerstats.pokerstats.auth.SecurityConfig$1@5b332439 too. Apr 30, 2020 at 13:21
  • This just disables authentication, and is not a solution. Ignoring the fact that this is adding a big risk of getting false positive test passes, it also does not cover scenarios where code depends on "current user". I have seen solutions like this ending up with developers sending "current user" as a request param which is a big security issue.
    – AmirMV
    Jul 2, 2021 at 8:16
1

You can get the Bearer token and pass it on as a HTTP Header. Below is a sample snippet of the Test Method for your reference,

@Test
public void existentUserCanGetTokenAndAuthentication() throws Exception {
   String username = "existentuser";
   String password = "password";

   String body = "{\"username\":\"" + username + "\", \"password\":\" 
              + password + "\"}";

   MvcResult result = mvc.perform(MockMvcRequestBuilders.post("/token")
          .content(body))
          .andExpect(status().isOk()).andReturn();

   String response = result.getResponse().getContentAsString();
   response = response.replace("{\"access_token\": \"", "");
   String token = response.replace("\"}", "");

   mvc.perform(MockMvcRequestBuilders.get("/users/" + userId + "/rounds")
      .header("Authorization", "Bearer " + token))
      .andExpect(status().isOk());
}
1

try with @WithMockUser

    @Test
    @WithMockUser(username="ahmed",roles={"ADMIN"})
    public void shouldGetAllRoundsByUserId() throws Exception {
1
  • @WithMockUser inject a UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken in test security context, not a JwtAuthenticationToken. Use SecurityMockMvcRequestPostProcessors.jwt() post-processor from spring-security-test or @WithMockJwtAuth from github.com/ch4mpy/spring-addons
    – ch4mp
    Jun 23 at 8:12
-1

create application.properties in test/resources (it will override main but for test stage only)

turnoff security by specifyig:

security.ignored=/**
security.basic.enable= false
spring.autoconfigure.exclude= org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.security.servlet.SecurityAutoConfiguration

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