4
public static String removeChar(String s, char c) {
  StringBuffer r = new StringBuffer( s.length() );
  r.setLength( s.length() );
  int current = 0;
  for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i ++) {
     char cur = s.charAt(i);
     if (cur != c) r.setCharAt( current++, cur );
  }
  return r.toString();
}

I've found the above code here.

Two Questions:

  1. why do we need to do setLength()? without which I am getting java.lang.StringIndexOutOfBoundsException: String index out of range: 0

  2. 'ttr' and three junk chars are coming when I run this program with parameters - "teeter" and "e". How to remove the unused whitespaces in the buffer?

4
  • 2
    Is there a reason you can't use String.replace() ( download.oracle.com/javase/1,5.0/docs/api/java/lang/…, char) ) ? Commented May 27, 2011 at 13:35
  • If you absolutely want to implement it yourself, it would be easier to create a new string, without the given characters than to try and modify the old one. Commented May 27, 2011 at 13:38
  • @zeropage: if I had to use replace() method, what should I specify the NEW char. If I specify '', its giving compilation error.
    – jai
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:07
  • You will need to escape it, like replace("\"", "") Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:12

7 Answers 7

6

Why not just use replaceAll? java.lang.String.replaceAll

3
  • 1
    You need to quote the regular expression! Instead use String.replace method.
    – dacwe
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:05
  • There is no need to quote if you are not using any patterns. If you are doing a simple substitution like removing all "a"s or all "foo"s you don't need to quote.
    – Asgeir
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 16:06
  • 1
    But the question is how to remove a character. Not a letter o a digit. String.replace(String, String) will work for ALL characters. Much better in this case when there is no need for regular expressions. Replacing characters like .\() won't work with this solution.
    – dacwe
    Commented May 28, 2011 at 8:32
2

I'll answer your questions:

1 - why do we need to do setLength()? without which I am getting java.lang.StringIndexOutOfBoundsException: String index out of range: 0

Initially your string buffer has no characters. You need to call setLength in order to populate your empty string buffer with characters. Null characters, '\0', (or junk characters as you call them) are added to the string buffer so that it reaches the specified length. If you don't, you get a StringIndexOutOfBoundsException because there are no characters in your string buffer. See Javadocs on StringBuffer#setLength.

So at the end of your method your string buffer has: [t][t][r][\0][\0][\0]

2 - 'ttr' and three junk chars are coming when I run this program with parameters - "teeter" and "e". How to remove the unused whitespaces in the buffer?

You can remove the null characters by calling: r.toString().trim() or r.substring(0,current)

1
  • r.toString().trim() is not working. Still null characters(in the form of squares) are showing up.
    – jai
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:03
1

It seems like you would just want to use the String.replaceAll(OLD, NEW);

0

Every string buffer has a capacity. As long as the length of the character sequence contained in the string buffer does not exceed the capacity, it is not necessary to allocate a new internal buffer array.

API - http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html

Secondly you can just call trim on the string if you want to remove whitespace from the beginning and the end.

But, the other comments suggesting you should use replace/replaceAll are the most pertinent ones. Why rewrite an inbuilt method.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html#replace(char, char)

0

Ignoring the fact you can use String.replaceAll()...

You should use the append method:

  public static String removeChar(final String s, final char c) {
    final StringBuffer r = new StringBuffer(s.length());
    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
      final char cur = s.charAt(i);
      if (cur != c) {
        r.append(cur);
      }
    }
    return r.toString();
  }

Now you won't get the StringIndexOutOfBoundsException.

BTW, in a single threaded environment you should really use StringBuilder.

0

There is a simpler solution:

public static String removeChar(String s, char c) {
    return s.replaceAll(Pattern.quote(new StringBuilder().append(c).toString()), "");
}
2
  • 2
    Won't work for all characters. You need to quote that regular expression! Instead use String.replace method.
    – dacwe
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:05
  • -1 @farshid-zaker your code won't compile. You can't call toString on a char.
    – dogbane
    Commented May 27, 2011 at 14:12
0

You can use:

public static String removeChar(String s, char c) {
    StringBuilder r = new StringBuilder();

    for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        char cur = s.charAt(i);
        if (cur != c) {
            r.append(cur);
        }
    }

    return r.toString();
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.