7

I was reading about the NVI Idiom and most examples follow this form

#include <iostream>

class Base {
public:
    virtual ~Base() = default;

    void do_something() {
        do_something_impl();
    }

private:
    virtual void do_something_impl() = 0;
};

class Derived : public Base {
private:
    void do_something_impl() override {
        std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";
    }
};

void foo(Base& b) {
    b.do_something();
}

int main() {
    Derived d;
    foo(d);
}

I have always had it in my head that "A private member of a class is only accessible to the members and friends of that class" (from cppreference), When do_something_impl is implemented in Derived, is the access specifier not taken into consideration? Or is Derived a member of Base? Does implementing a virtual function not count as "accessing"? I'm not sure which part of the language allows this.

6
  • I can't say with too much technical certainty but virtual functions are different. It's not accessing the method, it's redefining it. I'm sure there is a better way to say it. – Derek C. May 2 '20 at 0:57
  • I'm guessing I missed something when I learned about inheritance. Since do_something_impl is pure virtual, it has to be implemented somewhere in Derived - and the access specifier shouldn't disallow that. Maybe this is a symptom of only ever using public virtual functions - I've never thought about private ones. – Brady Dean May 2 '20 at 1:00
  • private isn't quite the straight jacket they teach it as. There are many ways to circumvent it. It's there to make it hard to shoot yourself in the foot, but you can still do it with a bigger gun. In this case, the function exists, and that's pretty much all that matters. – user4581301 May 2 '20 at 1:01
  • 3
    If anyone's looking for a Standard reference, [class.virtual] just allows it by saying nothing about access level in the definition of a function "override", but does have a footnote mentioning that access control is not considered. – aschepler May 2 '20 at 1:04
  • Thank you. I'll stop looking now. Are you canonizing that as an answer? I think this deserves one or a dupe. – user4581301 May 2 '20 at 1:05
7

From this [emphasis added]:

If some member function vf is declared as virtual in a class Base, and some class Derived, which is derived, directly or indirectly, from Base, has a declaration for member function with the same

  • name
  • parameter type list (but not the return type)
  • cv-qualifiers
  • ref-qualifiers

Then this function in the class Derived is also virtual (whether or not the keyword virtual is used in its declaration) and overrides Base::vf (whether or not the word override is used in its declaration).

Base::vf does not need to be accessible or visible to be overridden. (Base::vf can be declared private, or Base can be inherited using private inheritance. Any members with the same name in a base class of Derived which inherits Base do not matter for override determination, even if they would hide Base::vf during name lookup.)

class B {
    virtual void do_f(); // private member
 public:
    void f() { do_f(); } // public interface
};
struct D : public B {
    void do_f() override; // overrides B::do_f
};

int main()
{
    D d;
    B* bp = &d;
    bp->f(); // internally calls D::do_f();
}
1
  • That was strange wording, since "visible" is not related to "private". "Visible" means "not hidden by other declarations in name lookup", and "accessible" relates to public/protected/private rules. I've updated that paragraph on the wiki. – aschepler May 2 '20 at 1:21
3

Overriding the virtual function does not count as accessing. However if you need to call the base implementation, that would be impossible to do from Derived.

class Base {
public:
    virtual ~Base() = default;

    void do_something() {
        do_something_impl();
    }

private:
    virtual void do_something_impl() { /*Default implementation*/ }
};

class Derived : public Base {
private:
    void do_something_impl() override {
        //Base::do_something_impl() is not accessible from here:
        //Base::do_something_impl();
        std::cout << "Hello, world!\n";
    }
};

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.