304

Can somebody please explain with examples (of code) what is the difference between deadlock and livelock?

360

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadlock:

In concurrent computing, a deadlock is a state in which each member of a group of actions, is waiting for some other member to release a lock

A livelock is similar to a deadlock, except that the states of the processes involved in the livelock constantly change with regard to one another, none progressing. Livelock is a special case of resource starvation; the general definition only states that a specific process is not progressing.

A real-world example of livelock occurs when two people meet in a narrow corridor, and each tries to be polite by moving aside to let the other pass, but they end up swaying from side to side without making any progress because they both repeatedly move the same way at the same time.

Livelock is a risk with some algorithms that detect and recover from deadlock. If more than one process takes action, the deadlock detection algorithm can be repeatedly triggered. This can be avoided by ensuring that only one process (chosen randomly or by priority) takes action.

  • 8
    I found it already, but they don't have examples there as You could see, thanks anyway – macindows May 27 '11 at 17:57
  • 59
    I won't provide a code example, but consider two processes each waiting for a resource the other has but waiting in a non-blocking manner. When each learns they cannot continue they release their held resource and sleep for 30 seconds, then they retrieve their original resource followed by trying to the resource the other process held, then left, then reaquired. Since both processes are trying to cope (just badly), this is a livelock. – mah May 27 '11 at 17:58
  • 4
    can You give me the same example but with deadlock, thanks in advance – macindows May 27 '11 at 18:31
  • 28
    A deadlock example is much easier... assume two processes A and B, and each wants resource r1 and resource r2. Assume A receives (or already has) r1, and B receives (or already has) r2. Now each try to get the resource the other has, without any timeout. A is blocked because B holds r2, and B is blocked because A holds r1. Each process is blocked and thus cannot release the resource the other wants, causing deadlock. – mah May 27 '11 at 18:51
  • 2
    Within the context of Transactional memory there is a great video demonstrating deadlock and livelock: youtube.com/watch?v=_IxsOEEzf-c – BlackVegetable Apr 18 '15 at 22:25
72

Livelock

A thread often acts in response to the action of another thread. If the other thread's action is also a response to the action of another thread, then livelock may result.

As with deadlock, livelocked threads are unable to make further progress. However, the threads are not blocked — they are simply too busy responding to each other to resume work. This is comparable to two people attempting to pass each other in a corridor: Alphonse moves to his left to let Gaston pass, while Gaston moves to his right to let Alphonse pass. Seeing that they are still blocking each other, Alphonse moves to his right, while Gaston moves to his left. They're still blocking each other, and so on...

The main difference between livelock and deadlock is that threads are not going to be blocked, instead they will try to respond to each other continuously.

In this image, both circles (threads or processes) will try to give space to the other by moving left and right. But they can't move any further.

enter image description here

57

All the content and examples here are from

Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles
William Stallings
8º Edition

Deadlock: A situation in which two or more processes are unable to proceed because each is waiting for one the others to do something.

For example, consider two processes, P1 and P2, and two resources, R1 and R2. Suppose that each process needs access to both resources to perform part of its function. Then it is possible to have the following situation: the OS assigns R1 to P2, and R2 to P1. Each process is waiting for one of the two resources. Neither will release the resource that it already owns until it has acquired the other resource and performed the function requiring both resources. The two processes are deadlocked

Livelock: A situation in which two or more processes continuously change their states in response to changes in the other process(es) without doing any useful work:

Starvation: A situation in which a runnable process is overlooked indefinitely by the scheduler; although it is able to proceed, it is never chosen.

Suppose that three processes (P1, P2, P3) each require periodic access to resource R. Consider the situation in which P1 is in possession of the resource, and both P2 and P3 are delayed, waiting for that resource. When P1 exits its critical section, either P2 or P3 should be allowed access to R. Assume that the OS grants access to P3 and that P1 again requires access before P3 completes its critical section. If the OS grants access to P1 after P3 has finished, and subsequently alternately grants access to P1 and P3, then P2 may indefinitely be denied access to the resource, even though there is no deadlock situation.

APPENDIX A - TOPICS IN CONCURRENCY

Deadlock Example

If both processes set their flags to true before either has executed the while statement, then each will think that the other has entered its critical section, causing deadlock.

/* PROCESS 0 */
flag[0] = true; 
while (flag[1]) 
    /* do nothing */; 
/* critical section*/; 
flag[0] = false; 

 /* PROCESS 1 */
flag[1] = true;
while (flag[0])
    /* do nothing */;
/* critical section*/;
flag[1] = false;

Livelock Example

/* PROCESS 0 */
flag[0] = true; 
while (flag[1]){
    flag[0] = false; 
    /*delay */;
    flag[0] = true;
}
/*critical section*/;
flag[0] = false; 

/* PROCESS 1 */
flag[1] = true;
while (flag[0]) {
    flag[1] = false;
    /*delay */;
    flag[1] = true;
}
/* critical section*/;
flag[1] = false;

[...] consider the following sequence of events:

  • P0 sets flag[0] to true.
  • P1 sets flag[1] to true.
  • P0 checks flag[1].
  • P1 checks flag[0].
  • P0 sets flag[0] to false.
  • P1 sets flag[1] to false.
  • P0 sets flag[0] to true.
  • P1 sets flag[1] to true.

This sequence could be extended indefinitely, and neither process could enter its critical section. Strictly speaking, this is not deadlock, because any alteration in the relative speed of the two processes will break this cycle and allow one to enter the critical section. This condition is referred to as livelock. Recall that deadlock occurs when a set of processes wishes to enter their critical sections but no process can succeed. With livelock, there are possible sequences of executions that succeed, but it is also possible to describe one or more execution sequences in which no process ever enters its critical section.

13

DEADLOCK Deadlock is a condition in which a task waits indefinitely for conditions that can never be satisfied - task claims exclusive control over shared resources - task holds resources while waiting for other resources to be released - tasks cannot be forced to relinguish resources - a circular waiting condition exists

LIVELOCK Livelock conditions can arise when two or more tasks depend on and use the some resource causing a circular dependency condition where those tasks continue running forever, thus blocking all lower priority level tasks from running (these lower priority tasks experience a condition called starvation)

  • If the 'livelocked' tasks are following resource arbitration protocols which include 'backoff' delays, and spend most of their time in sleep state as result, then other tasks will not be starved. – greggo Mar 9 '15 at 14:17
5

Maybe these two examples illustrate you the difference between a deadlock and a livelock:


Java-Example for a deadlock:

import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class DeadlockSample {

    private static final Lock lock1 = new ReentrantLock(true);
    private static final Lock lock2 = new ReentrantLock(true);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread threadA = new Thread(DeadlockSample::doA,"Thread A");
        Thread threadB = new Thread(DeadlockSample::doB,"Thread B");
        threadA.start();
        threadB.start();
    }

    public static void doA() {
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 1");
        lock1.lock();
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 1");

        try {
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 2");
            lock2.lock();
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 2");

            try {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : critical section of doA()");
            } finally {
                lock2.unlock();
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 2 any longer");
            }
        } finally {
            lock1.unlock();
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 1 any longer");
        }
    }

    public static void doB() {
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 2");
        lock2.lock();
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 2");

        try {
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 1");
            lock1.lock();
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 1");

            try {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : critical section of doB()");
            } finally {
                lock1.unlock();
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 1 any longer");
            }
        } finally {
            lock2.unlock();
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 2 any longer");
        }
    }
}

Sample output:

Thread A : waits for lock 1
Thread B : waits for lock 2
Thread A : holds lock 1
Thread B : holds lock 2
Thread B : waits for lock 1
Thread A : waits for lock 2

Java-Example for a livelock:

import java.util.concurrent.locks.Lock;
import java.util.concurrent.locks.ReentrantLock;

public class LivelockSample {

    private static final Lock lock1 = new ReentrantLock(true);
    private static final Lock lock2 = new ReentrantLock(true);

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Thread threadA = new Thread(LivelockSample::doA, "Thread A");
        Thread threadB = new Thread(LivelockSample::doB, "Thread B");
        threadA.start();
        threadB.start();
    }

    public static void doA() {
        try {
            while (!lock1.tryLock()) {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 1");
                Thread.sleep(100);
            }
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 1");

            try {
                while (!lock2.tryLock()) {
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 2");
                    Thread.sleep(100);
                }
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 2");

                try {
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : critical section of doA()");
                } finally {
                    lock2.unlock();
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 2 any longer");
                }
            } finally {
                lock1.unlock();
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 1 any longer");
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // can be ignored here for this sample
        }
    }

    public static void doB() {
        try {
            while (!lock2.tryLock()) {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 2");
                Thread.sleep(100);
            }
            System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 2");

            try {
                while (!lock1.tryLock()) {
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : waits for lock 1");
                    Thread.sleep(100);
                }
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : holds lock 1");

                try {
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : critical section of doB()");
                } finally {
                    lock1.unlock();
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 1 any longer");
                }
            } finally {
                lock2.unlock();
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " : does not hold lock 2 any longer");
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // can be ignored here for this sample
        }
    }
}

Sample output:

Thread B : holds lock 2
Thread A : holds lock 1
Thread A : waits for lock 2
Thread B : waits for lock 1
Thread B : waits for lock 1
Thread A : waits for lock 2
Thread A : waits for lock 2
Thread B : waits for lock 1
Thread B : waits for lock 1
Thread A : waits for lock 2
Thread A : waits for lock 2
Thread B : waits for lock 1
...

Both examples force the threads to aquire the locks in different orders. While the deadlock waits for the other lock, the livelock does not really wait - it desperately tries to acquire the lock without the chance of getting it. Every try consumes CPU cycles.

protected by Community Feb 2 at 16:54

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.