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I'm trying to avoid0 CORS preflight requests for authorized GET requests, for latency performance reasons. The simple way to do that is putting the access token in a URL query parameter, but this is a bad security practice1.

According to this answer2, the goal of browsers is to block anything that couldn't already be accomplished with HTML tags like img or script. But if that's the case, why is it allowed to set headers like Accept or Content-Langage? You can't set those on an img tag. Also, what's preventing me from hiding my access token in the Accept header like this:

Accept: */*, x-access-token/<access_token>

It seems like the browser policies in this case don't add extra protection, and encourage developers to use insecure practices or nasty hacks. What am I missing?

  • That img tag interpretation is just over simplified. CORS policy at the implementation level is white-list base, it allows a limit set of headers and some other stuff. If you’re interested you can search for the spec. But back to your question, the why, because it’s white-list base. – hackape May 2 at 17:18
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    Thanks. But what exactly is it accomplishing, given how easy it is to put arbitrary data in the Accept header? – anderspitman May 2 at 17:19
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    Its easy but what can be done with that arbitrary data? No harm is done. – hackape May 2 at 17:24
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    No harm, but in order to make browser developers life easier, (and to make yours harder) the implementation is white-list base. – hackape May 2 at 17:33
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    As far as the “why is it allowed to set headers like Accept or Content-Langage”? part of this question, see the discussion at lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-webappsec/2013Aug/…. “Accept is pretty random due to plugins. Accept-Language and Content-Language I guess we considered safe enough. Not sure there was any particularly strong rationale” and “In the end, it looks somewhat arbitrary because it reflects the vagaries of the evolution in the previous 15 years of the Web platform.” – sideshowbarker May 2 at 23:47
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What's the question?

FYI: You don't actually have a singular question that can be answered. You've got, like, a million.

Your title asks a rather philosophical unanswerable question, but your post is asking for a solution to a use case.

Why do browsers allow setting some headers without CORS, but not others?

Personal / team bias. Politics. Religion.

It seems like the browser policies in this case don't add extra protection, and encourage developers to use insecure practices or nasty hacks. What am I missing?

It's called "Security Theater".

It's when people who know better make a political choice that appears to be so easy (or so difficult) to understand to those who don't have the knowledge to understand such things (or don't have to implement them) just accept it, so that they can get on with their lives - or in the case of Verisign, VPNs, and others - to make a profit.

why is it allowed to set headers like Accept or Content-Langage?

Those are benign headers that don't carry anything particularly identifiable or sensitive

Trying to avoid pre-flights with access tokens

The simple way to do that is putting the access token in a URL query parameter, but this is a bad security practice.

Yes and no.

If it's the session token and it lasts 90 days... sure, there are some downsides... assuming that you're either not using https (which IS bad) or that the attacker already has access to the user's machine (via code or otherwise)... in which case the attacker has access to their email to reset all of their passwords and logins, and probably their MFA (i.e. iMessage / Authy / LastPass) as well so... meh

If it's a short-lived ("short" meaning, say 15 minute) token on non-sensitive data (i.e. social media junk), who cares?

You could also make a single-use token which, assuming you don't put sensitive info in the token itself, would make everyone happy.

Dirty thoughts

Have you considered putting up a single endpoint that can proxy the requests? That's what all the kids are doing these days (looking at you GraphQL).

And if you try hard enough, iframes always have some way to be abused to solve your problem. They're the WD-40 (or duct-tape) of the web. Search your feelings... you know it to be true.

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  • Fair enough, thanks for your input! Unfortunately a proxy won't work for my case, because reasons. Most likely I'm just going to keep using query params, unless I run into issues with caching, then I might use the Accept hack. – anderspitman May 2 at 20:31
  • Please don't use the accept hack. But do limit your token lifetimes and use the queries all day long. – coolaj86 May 2 at 22:54

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