50

Based on this recent question, I don't understand the answer provided. Seems like you should be able to do something like this, since their scopes do not overlap

static void Main()
{
  {
    int i;
  }
  int i;
}

This code fails to compile with the following error:

A local variable named 'i' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'i', which is already used in a 'child' scope to denote something else

  • 7
    I've retagged it as C# since original tag included .net and linked Q suggests C#. Plus it's valid C and C++ (if you can get over the dodgy main definition) but produces an error in C#. And the main definition is fine in C# but not C or C++. – David Heffernan May 27 '11 at 18:50
  • @David Heffernan - Thank you, it was a typo – Aducci May 27 '11 at 18:57
  • Related (and probably) duplicate: stackoverflow.com/q/7992332/945456 – Jeff B Apr 15 '15 at 18:52
38

I don't think any of the answers so far have quite got the crucial line from the spec.

From section 8.5.1:

The scope of a local variable declared in a local-variable-declaration is the block in which the declaration occurs. It is an error to refer to a local variable in a textual position that precedes the local-variable-declarator of the local variable. Within the scope of a local variable, it is a compile-time error to declare another local variable or constant with the same name.

(Emphasis mine.)

In other words, the scope for the "later" variable includes the part of the block before the declaration - i.e. it includes the "inner" block containing the "earlier" variable.

You can't refer to the later variable in a place earlier than its declaration - but it's still in scope.

  • Jon, do you think this actually makes sense? If so, why? – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 9 '13 at 6:43
  • 1
    @DanielHilgarth: Yes, I think it makes sense. It avoids confusing code. – Jon Skeet Aug 9 '13 at 11:37
  • I agree that it would be confusing if the outer variable would be declared before the nested scope. But in a code that follows the example given by the OP, what would you see as confusing here? Just wondering what the rational behind that passage of the spec might be. – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 9 '13 at 12:05
  • 1
    @DanielHilgarth: Moving a variable declaration to earlier within the same block is usually a no-op, right? So it would be odd for that to cause a compilation error. – Jon Skeet Aug 9 '13 at 12:17
  • Yes, that indeed is a good point. Thanks :-) – Daniel Hilgarth Aug 9 '13 at 13:47
8

"The scope of local or constant variable extends to the end of the current block. You cannot declare another local variable with the same name in the current block or in any nested blocks." C# 3.0 in a Nutshell, http://www.amazon.com/3-0-Nutshell-Desktop-Reference-OReilly/dp/0596527578/

"The local variable declaration space of a block includes any nested blocks. Thus, within a nested block it is not possible to declare a local variable with the same name as a local variable in an enclosing block." Variable Scopes, MSDN, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691107%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

On a side note, this is quite the opposite that of JavaScript and F# scoping rules.

6

From the C# language spec:

The local variable declaration space of a block includes any nested blocks. Thus, within a nested block it is not possible to declare a local variable with the same name as a local variable in an enclosing block.

Essentially, it's not allowed because, in C#, their scopes actually do overlap.

edit: Just to clarify, C#'s scope is resolved at the block level, not line-by-line. So while it's true that you cannot refer to a variable in code that comes before its declaration, it's also true that its scope extends all the way back to the beginning of the block.

3

This has been a rule in C# from the first version.

Allowing overlapping scopes would only lead to confusion (of the programmers, not the compiler).

So it has been forbidden on purpose.

  • I think the OP's point is that the scopes don't overlap. Saying that overlapping scopes aren't allowed is sort of beside the point. – Gabe May 27 '11 at 18:59
  • Not only forbidden or purpose, but I thought it was interesting that the error message is slightly different in this case than the normal case were the outer variable is declared first, where the message is A local variable named 'i' cannot be declared in this scope because it would give a different meaning to 'i', which is already used in a 'parent or current' scope to denote something else. – sgmoore May 27 '11 at 19:05
  • See Jon Skeets answer, the block is the scope and they do overlap. You could call it 'overlapping blocks' if you like. – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 19:20
  • @Gabe: not true. In the O.P.s example code, despite the position of the declaration (last line in the block), the scope of the second declaration is the entire outermost block (the method body). The 1st declaration, in the inner block is illegal because it inherits the namespace ('local variable declaration space' in ISO-speak) of the containing block. As a result, the first declaration is not allowed as it steps on the second declaration (even though any references to the second declaration would be illegal: you'd get another compiler warning re: using something before its declaration. – Nicholas Carey May 27 '11 at 19:23
3

For C#, ISO 23270 (Information technology — Programming languages — C#), §10.3 (Declarations) says:

Each block, switch-block, for-statement, foreach-statement, or using-statement creates a declaration space for local variables and local constants called the local variable declaration space. Names are introduced into this declaration space through local-variable-declarations and local-constant declarations.

If a block is the body of an instance constructor, method, or operator declaration, or a get or set accessor for an indexer declaration, the parameters declared in such a declaration are members of the block’s local variable declaration space.

If a block is the body of a generic method, the type parameters declared in such a declaration are members of the block’s local variable declaration space.

It is an error for two members of a local variable declaration space to have the same name. It is an error for a local variable declaration space and a nested local variable declaration space to contain elements with the same name.

[Note: Thus, within a nested block it is not possible to declare a local variable or constant with the same name as a local variable or constant in an enclosing block. It is possible for two nested blocks to contain elements with the same name as long as neither block contains the other. end note]

So

public void foobar()
{
  if ( foo() )
  {
     int i = 0 ;
     ...
  }

  if ( bar() )
  {
    int i = 0 ;
    ...
  }

  return ;
}

is legal, but

public void foobar()
{
  int i = 0 ;

  if ( foo() )
  {
     int i = 0 ;
     ...
  }

  ...

  return ;
}

is not legal. Personally, I find the restriction rather annoying. I can see issuing a compiler warning about scope overlap, but a compilation error? Too much belt-and-suspenders, IMHO. I could see the virtue of a compiler option and/or pragma , though ( perhaps -pedantic/-practical, #pragma pedantic vs #pragma practical, B^)).

2

It's not a question of overlapping scopes. In C# a simple name cannot mean more than one thing within a block where it's declared. In your example, the name i means two different things within the same outer block.

In other words, you should be able to move a variable declaration around to any place within the block where it was declared without causing scopes to overlap. Since changing your example to:

static void Main()
{
    int i;
    {
        int i;
    }
}

would cause the scopes of the different i variables to overlap, your example is illegal.

  • Not entirely, i could appear in another nested block and mean something else there. – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 18:54
  • @Henk: It looks like my wording may have been ambiguous. Is it more clear now? – Gabe May 27 '11 at 18:58
  • Yes it is. I overlooked the sequencing a little. – Henk Holterman May 27 '11 at 19:15
1

I just compiled this in GCC both as C and as C++. I received no error message so it appears to be valid syntax.

Your question is tagged as .net and as c. Should this be tagged as c#? That language might have different rules than C.

1

In C you need to put all variable declaration at the very beginning of a block. They need to come all directly after the opening { before any other statements in this block.

So what you can do to make it compile is this:

static void Main()
{
  {
    int i;
  }
  {
    int i;
  }
}
  • The question has been tagged [C#] now. – Gabe May 27 '11 at 18:50
  • 2
    That hasn't been true since, what, C89? – jbruni May 27 '11 at 18:50
  • Actually that is no longer true in modern versions of C. The OP's code compiles as C99 in Comeau online. – David Heffernan May 27 '11 at 18:51
  • 1
    Also, since when was static void Main() the way to start a C program?!! – David Heffernan May 27 '11 at 18:56
  • I was mislead by the C tagging. But it is true in ANSI C (C89/C90), although many compilers have had extensions that compiled it before it was officially allowed in C99. Several embedded compilers i.e. Keil and also MSVC by default still don't allow declarations after statements. My C# knowledge is very limited but it seems my code could compile by the specification that Teoman Soygul has cited. – x4u May 27 '11 at 19:08
0

Here's your answer from MSDN .NET Documentation:

...The local variable declaration space of a block includes any nested blocks. Thus, within a nested block it is not possible to declare a local variable with the same name as a local variable in an enclosing block.

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