3

I'm working with a square matrix in R, we can call it mat, and would like to permute the columns (i.e. change their order) so as to maximise the sum of the diagonal elements. I want to do this via linear programming methods, i.e. relying on the optimization package lpSolve. Code solutions are of course appreciated but failing that, any help formulating it as a linear programming problem would be appreciated.

My question is similar to this one: Permute columns of a square 2-way contingency table (matrix) to maximize its diagonal. However, in that question, and others I have found on SO, it's considered sufficient to go row-wise maximising the diagonal element in that row. The problem is that something like

mat2 <- mat[,max.col(mat, 'first')]

isn't going to work for me: you could have situations where a row has multiple equal maxima, or where (say) in row X you pick 11 on the diagonal rather than 10 but consequently in row X+1 you are forced to have 5 on the diagonal rather than 30, since 30 was part of the same column as the 10.

I'm aware there is an algorithm called the Hungarian Algorithm for doing this, but I can't use any packages for this challenge except lpSolve.

6

A column permutation for the matrix A corresponds to a matrix-multiplication AP where P is a permutation matrix (a permuted identity matrix). So we can formulate the following mathematical model:

enter image description here

The first constraint is Y=AP. The constraints on P make sure P is a proper permutation matrix (one 1 in each row and column). The objective maximizes the trace of the column-permuted matrix Y (the trace of a matrix is the sum of its diagonal elements).

Note that we can optimize this formulation quite a bit (all y[i,j] with i<>j are not used and we can substitute out the remaining y's).

Some R code to try this out:

library(CVXR)

# random matrix A
set.seed(123)
n <- 10
A <- matrix(runif(n^2,min=-1,max=1),nrow=n,ncol=n)

# decision variables
P <- Variable(n,n,boolean=T)
Y <- Variable(n,n)

# optimization model
# direct translation of the mathematical model given above
problem <- Problem(Maximize(matrix_trace(Y)),
                   list(Y==A %*% P,
                        sum_entries(P,axis=1) == 1,
                        sum_entries(P,axis=2) == 1))

# solve and print results
result <- solve(problem)
cat("status:",result$status)
cat("objective:",result$value)

In this example, we start with the matrix

             [,1]        [,2]        [,3]        [,4]       [,5]       [,6]       [,7]        [,8]       [,9]       [,10]
 [1,] -0.42484496  0.91366669  0.77907863  0.92604847 -0.7144000 -0.9083377  0.3302304  0.50895032 -0.5127611 -0.73860862
 [2,]  0.57661027 -0.09333169  0.38560681  0.80459809 -0.1709073 -0.1155999 -0.8103187  0.25844226  0.3361112  0.30620385
 [3,] -0.18204616  0.35514127  0.28101363  0.38141056 -0.1725513  0.5978497 -0.2320607  0.42036480 -0.1647064 -0.31296706
 [4,]  0.76603481  0.14526680  0.98853955  0.59093484 -0.2623091 -0.7562015 -0.4512327 -0.99875045  0.5763917  0.31351626
 [5,]  0.88093457 -0.79415063  0.31141160 -0.95077263 -0.6951105  0.1218960  0.6292801 -0.04936685 -0.7942707 -0.35925352
 [6,] -0.90888700  0.79964994  0.41706094 -0.04440806 -0.7223879 -0.5869372 -0.1029673 -0.55976223 -0.1302145 -0.62461776
 [7,]  0.05621098 -0.50782453  0.08813205  0.51691908 -0.5339318 -0.7449367  0.6201287 -0.24036692  0.9699140  0.56458860
 [8,]  0.78483809 -0.91588093  0.18828404 -0.56718413 -0.0680751  0.5066157  0.6247790  0.22554201  0.7861022 -0.81281003
 [9,]  0.10287003 -0.34415856 -0.42168053 -0.36363798 -0.4680547  0.7900907  0.5886846 -0.29640418  0.7729381 -0.06644192
[10,] -0.08677053  0.90900730 -0.70577271 -0.53674843  0.7156554 -0.2510744 -0.1203366 -0.77772915 -0.6498947  0.02301092

This has trace(A)=0.7133438.

The Y variables have the columns permuted:

             [,1]        [,2]        [,3]        [,4]        [,5]        [,6]       [,7]       [,8]       [,9]      [,10]
 [1,]  0.92604847 -0.73860862  0.50895032  0.77907863 -0.42484496  0.91366669 -0.5127611  0.3302304 -0.9083377 -0.7144000
 [2,]  0.80459809  0.30620385  0.25844226  0.38560681  0.57661027 -0.09333169  0.3361112 -0.8103187 -0.1155999 -0.1709073
 [3,]  0.38141056 -0.31296706  0.42036480  0.28101363 -0.18204616  0.35514127 -0.1647064 -0.2320607  0.5978497 -0.1725513
 [4,]  0.59093484  0.31351626 -0.99875045  0.98853955  0.76603481  0.14526680  0.5763917 -0.4512327 -0.7562015 -0.2623091
 [5,] -0.95077263 -0.35925352 -0.04936685  0.31141160  0.88093457 -0.79415063 -0.7942707  0.6292801  0.1218960 -0.6951105
 [6,] -0.04440806 -0.62461776 -0.55976223  0.41706094 -0.90888700  0.79964994 -0.1302145 -0.1029673 -0.5869372 -0.7223879
 [7,]  0.51691908  0.56458860 -0.24036692  0.08813205  0.05621098 -0.50782453  0.9699140  0.6201287 -0.7449367 -0.5339318
 [8,] -0.56718413 -0.81281003  0.22554201  0.18828404  0.78483809 -0.91588093  0.7861022  0.6247790  0.5066157 -0.0680751
 [9,] -0.36363798 -0.06644192 -0.29640418 -0.42168053  0.10287003 -0.34415856  0.7729381  0.5886846  0.7900907 -0.4680547
[10,] -0.53674843  0.02301092 -0.77772915 -0.70577271 -0.08677053  0.90900730 -0.6498947 -0.1203366 -0.2510744  0.7156554

We have trace(Y)=7.42218. This is the best we can do (proven).

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you! Could you clarify the notation please, to be honest I don't really understand it (that is to say, you didn't introduce y, i,j, k, or p...) – Mobeus Zoom May 3 at 0:42
  • An implementation (using some R package for linear programming, whether lpSolve / lpSolveAPI or whatever you're comfortable with) would also be super useful for me! – Mobeus Zoom May 3 at 0:43
  • This is amazing! Where would I start to learn about the notation and the theory you used? My solution takes around 20 seconds to solve n = 10 whereas yours is instant. – Cole May 3 at 21:59
  • 3
    @Cole Wikipedia has a nice write up on Permutation Matrices. Here is a blog post with some additional information about this problem. Mixed Integer Programming is a broad area, both from a modeling perspective as with respect to algorithms. A MIP approach should be a bit more efficient than complete enumeration (of course for small instances complete enumeration is quite appropriate). – Erwin Kalvelagen May 3 at 22:35
2

This is brute force method looking at all of the permutations. It's likely to become untenable for large matrices.

library(RcppAlgos)
n = 5L
set.seed(123L)

mat = matrix(sample(1:10, n^2, TRUE), ncol = n)
mat
#>      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#> [1,]    3    5    5    3    9
#> [2,]    3    4    3    8    3
#> [3,]   10    6    9   10    4
#> [4,]    2    9    9    7    1
#> [5,]    6   10    9   10    7

col_perms = permuteGeneral(n, n)
rows = seq_len(n)

diag_sum = apply(col_perms, 1, function(col) sum(mat[cbind(rows, col)]))
optim_cols = which.max(diag_sum)

mat[cbind(rows, col_perms[optim_cols, ])]
#> [1]  9  8 10  9 10
mat[, col_perms[optim_cols, ]]
#>      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
#> [1,]    9    3    3    5    5
#> [2,]    3    8    3    3    4
#> [3,]    4   10   10    9    6
#> [4,]    1    7    2    9    9
#> [5,]    7   10    6    9   10
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.