3

Context: I am rewriting a library that worked with the GCC -fconcepts to C++20. Clang 10 and GCC 10 give me the same unexpected problem, so it's probably my fault.

I have a class template that supports two cases. It can either be created from a list of pin_out's, or from a list of port_out's.

template< typename T > concept pin_out = T::is_pin_out;

template< typename... Ts > concept pin_out_list = ( pin_out< Ts > && ... );

template< typename T > concept port_out = T::is_port_out;

template< typename... Ts >
   requires pin_out_list< Ts...> || ( port_out< Ts > && ... )
struct port;

When I write the specialization for a list of pins_out's, with the concepts TS I could write

template< pin_out_list... Ts > 
struct port< Ts... > {};

but now with C++20 the compilers complain that the specialization is not more constrained than the base. When I add a requires clause it does compile.

template< pin_out_list... Ts > 
   requires pin_out_list< Ts... >
struct port< Ts... > {};

And I can remove the pin_out_list... from the template header.

template< typename... Ts > 
   requires pin_out_list< Ts... >
struct port< Ts... > {};

Is the pin_out_list... in the specialization now silently ignored?

test it on compiler explorer

3

One of the many things that P1141 changed was what a variadic constraint actually means:

In [temp.param]/11 we have:

template <C2... T> struct s3; // associates C2<T...>

This seems to be doing an unexpected thing, which is having the constraint apply to more than one type in a pack at a time.

And as a result of that paper, a variadic constraint like that now applies to every type in the back. That is, we now have (this is in [temp.param]/5 now):

template <C2... T> struct s3; // associates (C2<T> && ... )

As a result, this specialization:

template< pin_out_list... Ts > 
struct port< Ts... > {};

means:

template <typename... Ts> requires (pin_out_list<Ts> && ...)
struct port<Ts...>;

and not:

template <typename... Ts> requires pin_out_list<Ts...>
struct port<Ts...>;

You need the latter meaning (this is the constraint in the primary expression) so you need to write the latter syntax. The compiler wasn't silently ignoring your specialization.

6
  • I saw that in deleted answer. But I deleted the answer because I thought another change in the standard made the specialization not more constrained than the primary template. Why does the normal form of (pin_out_list<Ts> && ...) and pin_out_list <Ts...> differ? – Oliv May 3 '20 at 14:46
  • @Oliv fold-expressions are atomic - So (pin_out_list<Ts> && ...) normalizes to that specific expression, while pin_out_list<Ts...> normalizes to the expression in the concept definition, which would be a different expression. Maybe this helps? – Barry May 3 '20 at 15:56
  • Thanks! Is P1141 comprehensive for the cha nges from TS to C++20, or is there any other document that summarizes the changes? – Wouter van Ooijen May 3 '20 at 16:18
  • @WoutervanOoijen I don't think there's any one document. There are a lot of changes. P1084 and P1452 are big ones. – Barry May 3 '20 at 16:29
  • @Barry Thank you, that helped me. This is realy tricky. So for constraint normalization folded logical expression are not equivalent to a sequence of non folded logical expression... This third case compiles, and this compilation is not a compiler bug !? – Oliv May 3 '20 at 16:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.