17

I don't understand what squeeze and unsqueeze do to a tensor, even after looking at the docs and related questions.

I tried to understand it by exploring it myself in python. I first created a random tensor with

x = torch.rand(3,2,dtype=torch.float)
>>> x
tensor([[0.3703, 0.9588],
        [0.8064, 0.9716],
        [0.9585, 0.7860]])

But regardless of how I squeeze it, I end up with the same results:

torch.equal(x.squeeze(0), x.squeeze(1))
>>> True

If I now try to unsqueeze I get the following,

>>> x.unsqueeze(1)
tensor([[[0.3703, 0.9588]],
        [[0.8064, 0.9716]],
        [[0.9585, 0.7860]]])
>>> x.unsqueeze(0)
tensor([[[0.3703, 0.9588],
         [0.8064, 0.9716],
         [0.9585, 0.7860]]])
>>> x.unsqueeze(-1)
tensor([[[0.3703],
         [0.9588]],
        [[0.8064],
         [0.9716]],
        [[0.9585],
         [0.7860]]])

However if I now create a tensor x = torch.tensor([1,2,3,4]), and I try to unsqueeze it then it appears that 1 and -1 makes it a column where as 0 remains the same.

x.unsqueeze(0)
tensor([[1, 2, 3, 4]])
>>> x.unsqueeze(1)
tensor([[1],
        [2],
        [3],
        [4]])
>>> x.unsqueeze(-1)
tensor([[1],
        [2],
        [3],
        [4]])

Can someone provide an explanation of what squeeze and unsqueeze are doing to a tensor? And what's the difference between providing the arguements 0, 1 and -1?

2

3 Answers 3

32

Here is a visual representation of what squeeze/unsqueeze do for an effectively 2d matrix:

enter image description here

When you are unsqueezing a tensor, it is ambiguous which dimension you wish to 'unsqueeze' it across (as a row or column etc). The dim argument dictates this - i.e. position of the new dimension to be added.

Hence the resulting unsqueezed tensors have the same information, but the indices used to access them are different.

14

Simply put, unsqueeze() "adds" a superficial 1 dimension to tensor (at the specified dimension), while squeeze removes all superficial 1 dimensions from tensor.

You should look at tensor's shape attribute to see it easily. In your last case it would be:

import torch

tensor = torch.tensor([1, 0, 2, 3, 4])
tensor.shape # torch.Size([5])
tensor.unsqueeze(dim=0).shape # [1, 5]
tensor.unsqueeze(dim=1).shape # [5, 1]

It is useful for providing single sample to the network (which requires first dimension to be batch), for images it would be:

# 3 channels, 32 width, 32 height
tensor = torch.randn(3, 32, 32)
# 1 batch, 3 channels, 32 width, 32 height
tensor.unsqueeze(dim=0).shape

unsqueeze can be seen if you create tensor with 1 dimensions, e.g. like this:

# 3 channels, 32 width, 32 height and some 1 unnecessary dimensions
tensor = torch.randn(3, 1, 32, 1, 32, 1)
# 1 batch, 3 channels, 32 width, 32 height again
tensor.squeeze().unsqueeze(0) # [1, 3, 32, 32]
3
  1. torch.unsqueeze(input, dim)Tensor

    a = torch.randn(4, 4, 4)
    torch.unsqueeze(a, 0).size()
    
    >>> torch.Size([1, 4, 4, 4])
    
    a = torch.randn(4, 4, 4)
    torch.unsqueeze(a, 1).size()
    
    >>> torch.Size([4, 1, 4, 4])
    
    a = torch.randn(4, 4, 4)
    torch.unsqueeze(a, 2).size()
    
    >>> torch.Size([4, 4, 1, 4])
    
    a = torch.randn(4, 4, 4)
    torch.unsqueeze(a, 3).size()
    
    >>> torch.Size([4, 4, 4, 1])
    
  2. torch.squeeze(input, dim=None, out=None)Tensor

    b = torch.randn(4, 1, 4)
    
    >>> tensor([[[ 1.2912, -1.9050,  1.4771,  1.5517]],
    
            [[-0.3359, -0.2381, -0.3590,  0.0406]],
    
            [[-0.2460, -0.2326,  0.4511,  0.7255]],
    
            [[-0.1456, -0.0857, -0.8443,  1.1423]]])
    
    b.size()
    
    >>> torch.Size([4, 1, 4])
    
    
    c = b.squeeze(1)
    
    
    b
    >>> tensor([[[ 1.2912, -1.9050,  1.4771,  1.5517]],
    
            [[-0.3359, -0.2381, -0.3590,  0.0406]],
    
            [[-0.2460, -0.2326,  0.4511,  0.7255]],
    
            [[-0.1456, -0.0857, -0.8443,  1.1423]]])
    
    
    b.size()
    >>> torch.Size([4, 1, 4])
    
    c
    >>> tensor([[ 1.2912, -1.9050,  1.4771,  1.5517],
            [-0.3359, -0.2381, -0.3590,  0.0406],
            [-0.2460, -0.2326,  0.4511,  0.7255],
            [-0.1456, -0.0857, -0.8443,  1.1423]])
    
    
    c.size()
    >>> torch.Size([4, 4])
    

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