48

I have a function with argument bar that has a default parameter, "". How do I override bar's default parameter with value undefined?

const foo = (bar = "") => {
  console.log(bar)
}

foo(null) // null
foo(undefined) // "" <-- I want this to log `undefined`

If this is impossible with default parameters, what would be an appropriate way to write foo to achieve this?

8
  • 11
    Is this purely academic or do you have a real-world use case for this?
    – Phil
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 3:00
  • 3
    In theory "default function parameters allow named parameters to be initialized with default values if no value or undefined is passed" Commented May 6, 2020 at 3:00
  • 1
    does it have to be console.log? what is the code that uses the actual variable passed to the function? can I see the source?
    – user120242
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 3:19
  • 1
    Can you please provide the real problem's sample code? jaredpalmer.com/formik/docs/tutorial Commented May 6, 2020 at 3:25
  • 2
    Achieve what? If you'd just omit the default value it would work for the two cases in the code you posted. So in what case do you want to get the empty string?
    – Bergi
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 12:33

6 Answers 6

47

what would be an appropriate way to write foo to achieve this?

If you mean to default only when there is no parameter passed to the function call, then you need to check the arguments length, or to spread the arguments if you want to keep an arrow function.

const foo = (...args) => {
  const bar = args.length ? args[0] : "";
  console.log(bar)
}

foo(null) // null
foo(undefined) // undefined
foo(); // ""

1
  • 6
    Great hack. However I'd like to note that if you find yourself needing to do something like this you need to rethink your design.
    – slebetman
    Commented May 6, 2020 at 22:33
26

No, you can't, by design.

You've run into an interesting demonstration of JavaScript's 'two nulls', null and undefined.

null is a designated null value

undefined is the absence of any value at all

You ask about the passing the 'value' undefined but that premise is flawed. There is no value undefined - undefined is the lack of a value.

Therefore, you shouldn't pass undefined as a meaningful value to be interpreted by a function. I mean, you can, but from the point of view of JavaScript it is equivalent to passing nothing at all - so you're fighting against the design of the language and will run into issues like this one.

If you want to pass a meaningful, purposeful null value, that is what null is for.

5
  • Related: The Post JavaScript Apocalypse (at 12 min 16 secs) Commented May 6, 2020 at 16:15
  • 1
    -1 If JavaScript was perfectly sane, this would be true, but it's not, and it's not. As @Kaiido's answer demonstrates, there absolutely is a difference between supplying undefined as an argument, and supplying no argument at all, specifically the length of arguments. Similarly there's a difference between objects that have a property where the "value" is undefined and where that property doesn't exist at all.
    – Chris
    Commented May 12, 2020 at 22:52
  • @Chris sure, but philosophically and pragmatically what I've said is true, and if you write your code around assumptions of undefined as a meaningful value you're going to run into issues and have to fight against the language. You can definitely use certain tricks to identify the presence of undefined, but at that point you're getting quite far into metaprogramming. In standard usage, for practical purposes, it's absolutely the case that undefined is functionally equivalent to the absence of a value.
    – davnicwil
    Commented May 13, 2020 at 0:05
  • Your objects example is an interesting one, by the way :-) But I'd actually say it's not a counter point to what I've said. Looking at the object as a mapping of keys to values, I think it's a legitimate usecase to actually want to have keys present (so you can, for instance, iterate over them) when you aren't sure yet what they map to. If you know they map to nothing, you assign them null, say, but when you don't know yet whether they'll map to something or not, you put them in the object but keep the value they're mapped to as undefined - i.e. the absence of a value
    – davnicwil
    Commented May 13, 2020 at 0:11
  • What you're saying is perfectly logical, and I would say is the correct way to program in JavaScript. It's just that if you don't know the difference, some bugs are going to kick your butt :-) I think my answer to the OP would have been, "Yes, you can do that, but you should code as if you couldn't."
    – Chris
    Commented May 13, 2020 at 2:48
15

Maybe because you can't. That's the reason default parameters are designed to guard against undefined values.

As per Mozilla documentation

Default function parameters allow named parameters to be initialized with default values if no value or undefined is passed

See above. It's clearly written: if undefined is passed, default parameters are used.

6

In the example code you just provided, that's apparently not possible.

As per the official documentation.

In JavaScript, function parameters default to undefined. However, it's often useful to set a different default value. This is where default parameters can help.

3

The very definition of default parameters is to initialize no values or undefined with the given values.

So, you would want to remove the default parameter and add a conditional check within your function(see Kaiido's answer). Otherwise, you cannot differentiate between foo(undefined) and foo().

If you want both foo(undefined) and foo() to log undefined, you can simply remove the default parameter

1

Given this method (typescript, sorry I assume es6 is similar):

private static Foo(test: string, bar?: string): void
{
    let args = arguments && arguments.length ? arguments.length : 0;

    console.log(test, {
        bar: bar,
        type: typeof bar,
        isUndefined: bar === undefined,
        arguments: args,
        value: (bar === undefined && args == 2) ? undefined : (bar === null && args == 2) ? null : bar ? bar : ""
    });
}

Called with this:

let u;
let v = undefined;

this.Foo("no parameter");
this.Foo("null", null);
this.Foo("empty", "");
this.Foo("non-empty", "non-empty");
this.Foo("undefined", undefined);
this.Foo("undefined parameter", u);
this.Foo("parameter with value of undefined", v);

We get these results:

no parameter 
{bar: undefined, type: "undefined", isUndefined: true, arguments: 1, value: ""}

null 
{bar: null, type: "object", isUndefined: false, arguments: 2, value: null}

empty 
{bar: "", type: "string", isUndefined: false, arguments: 2, value: ""}

non-empty 
{bar: "non-empty", type: "string", isUndefined: false, arguments: 2, value: "non-empty"}

undefined 
{bar: undefined, type: "undefined", isUndefined: true, arguments: 2, value: undefined}

undefined parameter 
{bar: undefined, type: "undefined", isUndefined: true, arguments: 2, value: undefined}

parameter with value of undefined 
{bar: undefined, type: "undefined", isUndefined: true, arguments: 2, value: undefined}

Thus we can see that we cannot tell the difference between a variable that is undefined and a variable that contains the value undefined.

By looking at the number of arguments we can tell if an argument is missing, and then if it is exactly (===) undefined or null.

1
  • "the difference between a variable that is undefined and a variable that contains the value undefined" - uh, there is no such difference, that's why we cannot tell it :-)
    – Bergi
    Commented May 13, 2020 at 12:12

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