1

Is there a way to "shrink a namespace"?

e.g.

std::chrono::milliseconds to std::milliseconds by the namespace alone?

i.e.

namespace std = std::chrono

(please disregard the fact that this is modifying std. this is just an example I think everyone can understand)

9
  • That would change the meaning of std, so no. You can shorten namespaces with an alias though. – cigien May 7 '20 at 0:39
  • How about inside the namespace? Like if I declare out namespaces within namespaces for organization, is there anyway to shrink it? – nowi May 7 '20 at 0:42
  • I think so. It'll be easier to understand what you mean if you show some code, even if it doesn't compile. – cigien May 7 '20 at 0:44
  • @cigien namespace std { using namespace chrono; } will that work? – nowi May 7 '20 at 0:52
  • 1
    Just in general, it's not helpful to ask a question like "How do I do X? (I don't mean literally X, I know X is bad, I just mean something like X? Come on people it's right there in the spoiler!)" Just ask "How do I do Y?" instead. – Barry May 7 '20 at 1:09
1

Add your own alias to std::chrono, external to std:

namespace chrono = std::chrono;

And then use chrono::milliseconds.


It's possible to collapse layers of namespaces by adding an internal namespace alias. The standard library does this:

namespace std {
    namespace ranges::views { /* views stuff */ }

    namespace views = ranges::views;
}

So that std::ranges::views::filter can also be accesses as std::views::filter.

But that doesn't help here because milliseconds is a type, not a namespace. The only way to collapse the contents of a namespace is with a using-directive (or equivalently, a whole lot of using-declarations):

namespace std {
    namespace chrono { /* chrono things */ }

    using namespace chrono;
}

Which isn't really a good idea because it could just break name lookup for things - especially if anything in std::chrono is named the same as something in std. This also completely defeats the purpose of having the nested namespace to begin with.

So the equivalent to the inner namespace alias would just be the outer namespace alias:

namespace std {
    namespace chrono { /* chrono things */ }
}
namespace chrono = std::chrono;

And now you write chrono::milliseconds instead of std::chrono::milliseconds, without having to break anything in any of those namespaces.

Alternatively, if you really want to just shove everything into the same namespace, do it into a different one:

namespace all {
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;
}

Although, as I said, questionable.

0

If you have a namespace with some deeply nested name that you want to shorten (and it's a namespace you are allowed to modify). e.g:

namespace my {
  namespace deeply {
    namespace nested {
      namespace ns {
 // ...
}}}}

you can simplify it with a namespace alias:

namespace my {
  namespace easy = deeply::nested::ns;
}
0

Is there a way to "shrink a namespace"?

You can give namespace an alias, or you can have using namespace declarations.

e.g.

std::chrono::milliseconds to std::milliseconds

Something like that is possible, but not for the std namespace because you may not put such declarations there.

But this is possible for example:

namespace my {
     using namespace std::chrono;
}

and this:

namespace my_chrono = std::chrono;
3
  • 1
    That doesn't really address the OP's concern. That approach would simply make it so my::chrono::milliseconds can be used instead of std::chrono::milliseconds. Perhaps you meant something more like namespace my { using milliseconds = std::chrono::milliseconds; } instead? Then my::milliseconds can be used. – Remy Lebeau May 7 '20 at 0:57
  • 1
    @RemyLebeau Fair enough. I didn't think it through to the end. I've fixed the answer. – eerorika May 7 '20 at 1:55
  • That looks better, now my::milliseconds and my_chrono::milliseconds should work, respectively. – Remy Lebeau May 7 '20 at 2:00

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