322

I want to get the name of the currently running program, that is the executable name of the program. In C/C++ you get it from args[0].

  • Executable is EXE file (Windows Forms, WPF applications) ? A program can be a Desktop App (WinForms, WPF; and WinRT-Windows Phone?), Web Application, Wcf Service Application, Visual Studio Addin, Outlook-Word Addin, Unit Test in VS (MSTest), or, Silverlight Application. – Kiquenet Mar 27 '14 at 14:36

20 Answers 20

384
System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName
  • 54
    Beware of accepted answer. We've had issues with using System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName under Click-Once deployed applications. For us, this is returning "DefaultDomain", and not the original exe name. – Gaspode Apr 13 '10 at 14:30
  • 13
    @JustSmith: For amusement, try CurrentDomain.StarWarsName – Jeff Yates Nov 3 '10 at 14:19
  • 36
    We used this in the end: string file = object_of_type_in_application_assembly.GetType().Assembly.Location; string app = System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension( file ); – Gaspode May 10 '11 at 15:10
  • 4
    FriendlyName can be set to anything. Also getting the assembly location may not be enough if you have an exe with several dlls. Furthermore if you use several AppDomain, Assembly.GetCallingAssembly() returns null. – user276648 May 16 '12 at 1:19
  • 3
    This can be useful, but it should not be the accepted answer: It is vastly different from what was asked for - it will coincidentally be the same thing in some situations, but this is something else entirely. If you didn't write the application yourself it could very well return "I like potatoes!" or whatever else your humorous colleague wrote into this property when they built the application! – AnorZaken Jun 12 '16 at 1:52
213

System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName - Returns the filename with extension (e.g. MyApp.exe).

System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName - Returns the filename without extension (e.g. MyApp).

System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName - Returns the full path and filename (e.g. C:\Examples\Processes\MyApp.exe). You could then pass this into System.IO.Path.GetFileName() or System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension() to achieve the same results as the above.

  • 3
    AppDomain can be a EXE application, Web application, Unit test application, Addin Visual Studio, and "Silverlight App"(?). Maybe interesting full solution for all cases. For example, for Unit Test VS2012 - ProcessName: vstest.executionengine.x86 MainModule.FileName: C:\PROGRAM FILES (X86)\MICROSOFT VISUAL STUDIO 11.0\COMMON7\IDE\COMMONEXTENSIONS\MICROSOFT\TESTWINDOW\vstest.executionengine.x86.exe MainModule.ModuleName: vstest.executionengine.x86.exe FriendlyName: UnitTestAdapter: Running test ApplicationName: – Kiquenet Mar 26 '14 at 8:18
  • A "program" can be a Desktop App (WinForms, WPF; and WinRT-Windows Phone?), Web Application, Wcf Service Application, Visual Studio Addin, Outlook-Word Addin, Unit Test in VS (MSTest), or, Silverlight Application. For example, how get service Host assembly for a Wcf Service Application hosted in IIS, not IISExpress or WebDevServer ? – Kiquenet Mar 27 '14 at 14:37
  • 6
    +1 I’m going to go with this answer because it provides all three variations that you might need in a clean and simple way. Using the bare program name without path or extension is very useful for in-program help text (/? switch), because using the extension and path just clutter it unnecessarily. – Synetech Jul 6 '14 at 19:20
  • 2
    Remember to dispose the result of GetCurrentProcess() – Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Jan 22 '17 at 17:39
  • Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName() returns MyApp.vshost for me. – Jonathan Wood Sep 28 '18 at 15:14
101

System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess() gets the currently running process. You can use the ProcessName property to figure out the name. Below is a sample console app.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
  • 35
    Better use Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName – KindDragon Nov 30 '10 at 17:12
  • Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName works perfectly from within an Excel Addin (ExcelDNA) – earcam Mar 15 '12 at 10:24
  • 9
    This approach will fail when used on the Mono runtime; the process name for applications running on Mono will always be some variant of .../bin/mono on *nixes or .../mono.exe on Windows. – cdhowie Oct 21 '12 at 20:11
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer. Current AppDomain name may have nothing to do with executable process name, especially when multiple app domains are present – Ivan Krivyakov Aug 12 '15 at 19:47
  • This method can be substantially slower than playing with the Assembly class. – Erwin Mayer Jan 20 '16 at 5:33
93

This should suffice:

Environment.GetCommandLineArgs()[0];
  • 3
    Hmm, this returns (when run from vs.net and using the debug hosting thing), the location and name of the filename.vshost.exe ... that is indeed the file that is executing at this time ) – Frederik Gheysels Mar 5 '09 at 21:05
  • 10
    This the best answer for me because Environment.GetCommandLineArgs() is the exact C# analogue of argv from C/C++. – Frederick The Fool Jun 3 '12 at 6:45
  • Agreed! best answer. I have a need to get Environment.GetCommandLineArgs()[1]; – Jerry Liang Mar 16 '13 at 4:02
  • Works on Mono/Linux. The returned string is the full path to the exe running without the "mono " part that would be really bothersome if present. As said before this is exact analogue of C/C++ main function argv parameter. – Hatoru Hansou Jan 23 '14 at 0:02
  • To avoid full path: Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(Environment.GetCommandLineArgs()[0]) – Nathan Apr 24 '14 at 0:34
20

This is the code which worked for me:

string fullName = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location;
string myName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(fullName);

All the examples above gave me the processName with vshost or the running dll name.

  • 4
    For those that dont know, or missed it in other answers, the namespace for Assembly is System.Reflection, and the namespace for Path is System.IO. – amalgamate Apr 2 '15 at 14:19
  • 3
    GetEntryAssembly will return null if the application entry point is in native code rather than an assembly. – Emdot Jul 4 '15 at 23:34
18

Try this:

System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()

This returns you a System.Reflection.Assembly instance that has all the data you could ever want to know about the current application. I think that the Location property might get what you are after specifically.

  • 5
    It might be safer to use CodeBase instead of Location in case .NET's shadow copy feature is active. See blogs.msdn.com/suzcook/archive/2003/06/26/… – Dirk Vollmar Aug 12 '09 at 9:28
  • 18
    Beware of GetExecutingAssembly(): if you call this from a library assembly, it returns the name of the library assembly, which is different from the name of the entry assembly (i.e. the original executable). If you use GetEntryAssembly(), it returns the name of the actual executable, but it throws an exception if the process is running under WCF (admittedly a rare situation). For the most robust code, use Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName. – Contango Nov 3 '10 at 12:01
  • @Gravitas: Certainly not, any executable that is running "interpreted", e.g. with /usr/bin/mono will have the wrong process name. Also ProcessName won't work with windows services. If you use it in a library, use GetCallingAssembly. – Stefan Steiger Mar 6 '13 at 20:15
  • 1
    Worked for me. The property Name of the returned Assembly instance GetName() call is what you need, and does not include the ".exe" part. Also tested on Mono/Linux with expected result. Assembly.GetName().Name – Hatoru Hansou Jan 22 '14 at 23:54
  • 1
    Hmm, note that the returned string won't change even if you rename the executable file by hand using the file explorer. While Environment.GetCommandLineArgs()[0] changes along with the actual executable filename (of course). Coincidentally, the second method resulted better for my specific situation as I want the data folder to be named as the actual executable filename. – Hatoru Hansou Jan 23 '14 at 2:25
11
System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().ManifestModule.Name;

will give you FileName of your app like; "MyApplication.exe"

11

Why nobody suggested this, its simple.

Path.GetFileName(Application.ExecutablePath)
  • 3
    Which namespace does Application resides. – Jeetendra Aug 8 '14 at 9:19
  • 2
    System.Windows.Forms – xmen Aug 9 '14 at 1:19
  • 5
    This is useful when inside a Windows Forms app, but not otherwise – NineBerry Jan 20 '16 at 16:05
  • @NineBerry You might be interested in Application.ExecutablePath's source code. – Spooky Jan 21 '16 at 23:03
  • @NineBerry See my post. This works within Console apps if you add a reference to System.Windows.Forms. – John Jul 15 '17 at 0:13
10

Couple more options:

  • System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Name
  • Path.GetFileName(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().CodeBase
8

When uncertain or in doubt, run in circles, scream and shout.

class Ourself
{
    public static string OurFileName() {
        System.Reflection.Assembly _objParentAssembly;

        if (System.Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() == null)
            _objParentAssembly = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetCallingAssembly();
        else
            _objParentAssembly = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly();

        if (_objParentAssembly.CodeBase.StartsWith("http://"))
            throw new System.IO.IOException("Deployed from URL");

        if (System.IO.File.Exists(_objParentAssembly.Location))
            return _objParentAssembly.Location;
        if (System.IO.File.Exists(System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName))
            return System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory + System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName;
        if (System.IO.File.Exists(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location))
            return System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;

        throw new System.IO.IOException("Assembly not found");
    }
}

I can't claim to have tested each option, but it doesn't do anything stupid like returning the vhost during debugging sessions.

  • 1
    +1 for amusement. :-) I would hardly use this code, though, unless I'm writing a really generic library that has no idea about its environment (and then it probably wouldn't be a good idea to maintain whatever global state you were going to use the name for). – Andrey Tarantsov Mar 22 '13 at 8:57
  • @Orwellophile A "program" can be a Desktop App (WinForms, WPF; and WinRT-Windows Phone?), Web Application, Wcf Service Application, Visual Studio Addin, Outlook-Word Addin, Unit Test in VS (MSTest), or, Silverlight Application. For example, how get service Host assembly for a Wcf Service Application hosted in IIS, not IISExpress or WebDevServer ? Any full code valid for A WinForms, WPF, Web Application, Wcf Service Application, Visual Studio Addin, Outlook-Word Addin, Unit Test in VS (MSTest) applications ? – Kiquenet Mar 27 '14 at 14:39
8
  • System.Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location returns location of exe name if assembly is not loaded from memory.
  • System.Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().CodeBase returns location as URL.
  • Tested, this works 100%, even if its called from within a C# library. – Contango Nov 3 '10 at 10:58
  • 1
    GetEntryAssembly() returns null if you're not in the main AppDomain. – user276648 May 16 '12 at 1:20
8

If you need the Program name to set up a firewall rule, use:

System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule.FileName

This will ensure that the name is correct both when debugging in VisualStudio and when running the app directly in windows.

  • 2
    For my purposes (creating a logging filename), this is the best answer. If running a hosted process (say, a service, or a web application), System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName can return an ugly GUID-y name with embedded slashes. – Curt Aug 8 '16 at 17:59
5

IF you are looking for the full path information of your executable, the reliable way to do it is to use the following:

   var executable = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().MainModule
                       .FileName.Replace(".vshost", "");

This eliminates any issues with intermediary dlls, vshost, etc.

  • I tried your reliable way in Ubuntu Linux 15.10 C++ using realpath followed by STL C++ string replace and it caused Point and Click to fail. Could that have been caused by a bug in mono as our director of software surmised today? Thanks. – Frank Feb 17 '16 at 3:35
  • I don't program on Mono, though it might be fun to try – theMayer Feb 17 '16 at 4:46
  • Gasponde wrote above that "We've had issues with using System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName under Click-Once deployed applications." Could you make a guess as to what the issues might be with Click-Once deployed applications in .NET? Thanks. – Frank Feb 17 '16 at 5:42
4

You can use Environment.GetCommandLineArgs() to obtain the arguments and Environment.CommandLine to obtain the actual command line as entered.

Also, you can use Assembly.GetEntryAssembly() or Process.GetCurrentProcess().

However, when debugging, you should be careful as this final example may give your debugger's executable name (depending on how you attach the debugger) rather than your executable, as may the other examples.

  • 4
    Beware of GetExecutingAssembly(): if you call this from a library assembly, it returns the name of the library assembly, which is different from the name of the entry assembly (i.e. the original executable). If you use GetEntryAssembly(), it returns the name of the actual executable, but it throws an exception if the process is running under WCF (admittedly a rare situation). For the most robust code, use Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName. – Contango Nov 3 '10 at 12:02
  • @Gravitas: good point - wow, it's been a while since I wrote this! :D I'll edit accordingly – Jeff Yates Nov 3 '10 at 14:17
  • Environment.CommandLine gives the absolute path, not the entered command line, at least on Mono/Linux. – Mechanical snail Dec 9 '12 at 0:14
  • @Mechanicalsnail: Sounds like Mono doesn't quite follow the documentation. Interesting. – Jeff Yates Dec 10 '12 at 15:29
2

Is this what you want:

Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly ().Location
  • 4
    Beware of GetExecutingAssembly(): if you call this from a library assembly, it returns the name of the library assembly, which is different from the name of the entry assembly (i.e. the original executable). If you use GetEntryAssembly(), it returns the name of the actual executable, but it throws an exception if the process is running under WCF (admittedly a rare situation). For the most robust code, use Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName. – Contango Nov 3 '10 at 12:02
2

Super easy, here:

Environment.CurrentDirectory + "\\" + Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName

  • For .NET Core Process.GetCurrentProcess().ProcessName returns "dotnet". – Evgeni Nabokov Aug 29 '18 at 23:40
1

On .Net Core (or Mono), most of the answers won't apply when the binary defining the process is the runtime binary of Mono or .Net Core (dotnet) and not your actual application you're interested in. In that case, use this:

var myName = Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().Location);
  • 1
    GetEntryAssembly() can return null. – user2864740 Jun 27 '17 at 22:41
1

For windows apps (forms and console) I use this:

Add a reference to System.Windows.Forms in VS then:

using System.Windows.Forms;
namespace whatever
{
    class Program
    {
        static string ApplicationName = Application.ProductName.ToString();
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ........
        }
    }
}

This works correctly for me whether I am running the actual executable or debugging within VS.

Note that it returns the application name without the extension.

John

0

Try Application.ExecutablePath

0

This works if you need only the Application name without extensio:

 Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName);

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