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In SML, if I am correct, variables are immutable by default. So when we try to redefine a variable:

val y  = 100;
val y = 0.6;
y

the environment will have two entries for y. The new entry hides the original entry. Isn't it the same effect as if we modified the value in the original entry from 100 to 0.6?

  • If the original entry was created outside a function call, and the new entry was created in a function call, then when the function call returns, we can access the original entry.

  • If both entries were created in the same "scope", like the example above, is the original entry not accessible?

Effectively, isn't it the same in SML as in an imperative language such as C? What is the point of making a variable immutable in SML and creating a new entry when redefining a variable?

2 Answers 2

5

Isn't it the same effect as if we modified the value in the original entry from 100 to 0.6

No. Consider code that references the previous environment through use of a closure like

val x = 7
val f = fn () => x
val x = 8
val _ = print (Int.toString (f ())) (* prints 7 *)

If the original entry was created outside a function call, and the new entry was created in a function call, then when the function call returns, we can access the original entry.

Sure, its statically scoped.

If both entries were created in the same "scope", like the example above, is the original entry not accessible?

It is still accessible, just not by that identifier. Consider the example above.

What is the point of making a variable immutable in SML and creating a new entry when redefining a variable?

One use of this is changing the type of a variable while still using the same identifier (which you do in the example you post!). Take for instance (in C):

int i = 7;
i = 7.0;

Here, i will still be of type int. Cf., in SML:

val i : int = 7
val i : real = 7.0

I've added type annotations for illustration, but even without this has the same behaviour. After the second binding, i has type real.

4

To amend kopecs' answer:

What is the point of making a variable immutable in SML and creating a new entry when redefining a variable?

That is the wrong way to phrase the question. :) Immutability by default has many merits, but that would be off-topic.

The actual question is: Why does SML allow multiple bindings for the same variable in a single scope? Instead of making it an error?

And that's a fair question. There is no deep reason. It merely turns out to be convenient sometimes. For example, to avoid spurious identifier clashes when using open. Or to allow redefining previous definitions in an interactive session.

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