When you code in other languages, you will sometimes create a block scope, like this:

statement
...
statement
{
    statement
    ...
    statement
}
statement
...
statement

One purpose (of many) is to improve code readability: to show that certain statements form a logical unit or that certain local variables are used only in that block.

Is there an idiomatic way of doing the same thing in Python?

  • 1
    One purpose (of many) is to improve code readability - Python code, written correctly (ie, following the zen of python) would not need such garnish to be readable. In fact, it is one of the (many) things I like about Python. – Burhan Khalid Oct 8 '12 at 3:59
  • I have tried to play with __exit__ and with statement, changing the globals() but I failed. – Ruggero Turra Aug 14 '15 at 11:03
  • it would be very useful to define variable lifetime, connected to the resource acquisition – Ruggero Turra May 20 '16 at 14:04
  • 8
    @BurhanKhalid: That is not true. The zen of Python does not prevent you from polluting a local scope with a temporary variable here and there. If you turn every usage of a single temporary variable into e.g. defining a nested function which is called immediately, the zen of Python won't be happy either. Explicitly limiting the scope of a variable is tool to improve readability, because it directly answers "are these identifiers used below?" -- a question that can arise reading even the most elegant Python code. – bluenote10 Jun 5 '16 at 9:19
  • 3
    @BurhanKhalid It's fine to not have a feature. But calling that "zen" is just disgusting. – Phil Nov 29 '17 at 19:26
up vote 53 down vote accepted

No, there is no language support for creating block scope. The only means to create scope is functions, classes or modules.

  • @Alaya Yes, and various other languages too. But the question was specifically about Python. – ThomasH May 3 '17 at 14:02
  • Sorry, I misread your answer as "there is no language that supports block scoping"... – Alaya May 4 '17 at 3:21
  • @Alaya, yeah maybe delete your comment? – JoelFan Aug 1 '17 at 22:20

The idiomatic way in Python is to keep your functions short. If you think you need this, refactor your code! :)

Python creates a new scope for each module, class, function or generator expression (in Python 3.x also for list comprehensions). Apart from this, there are no nested scopes inside of functions.

  • 3
    "The most important thing in programming is the ability to give something a name. The second most important thing is to not be required to give something a name." For the most part, Python requires that scopes (for variables, etc.) be given names. In this respect, Python variables the second most important test. – Krazy Glew May 21 '16 at 0:59
  • 8
    The most important things in programming is the ability to manage the dependencies of your application and manage scopes of code blocks. Anonymous blocks let you limit the lifetime of callbacks, whereas otherwise, your callbacks get only used once, but live for the duration of the program, this causes global scope clutter and harms readability of code. – Dmitry Oct 24 '16 at 23:55

You can do something similar to a C++ block scope in Python by declaring a function inside your function and then immediately calling it. For example:

def my_func():
    shared_variable = calculate_thing()

    def do_first_thing():
        ... = shared_variable
    do_first_thing()

    def do_second_thing():
        foo(shared_variable)
        ...
    do_second_thing()

If you're not sure why you might want to do this then this video might convince you.

The basic principle is to scope everything as tightly as possible without introducing any 'garbage' (extra types/functions) into a wider scope than is absolutely required - Nothing else wants to use the do_first_thing() method for example so it shouldn't be scoped outside the calling function.

I agree that there is no block scope. But one place in python 3 makes it SEEM as if it has block scope.

what happened which gave this look? This was working properly in python 2. but to make variable leakage stop in python 3 they have done this trick and this change makes it look like as if it has block scope here.

Let me explain.


As per the idea of scope, when we introduce variables with same names inside the same scope, its value should be modified.

this is what is happening in python 2

>>> x = 'OLD'
>>> sample = [x for x in 'NEW']
>>> x
'W'

But in python 3 even though the variable with same name is introduced it does not override, the list comprehension acts like a sandbox for some reason and seems like creating a new scope in it.

>>> x = 'OLD'
>>> sample = [x for x in 'NEW']
>>> x
'OLD'

and this answer goes against the answerer @Thomas's statement The only means to create scope is functions, classes or modules because this looks like one other place of creating a new scope.

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.