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See the following code:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main(void)
{
    printf("%lu",strlen("\\n"));
}

I know that the output would be 2 but confused whether \\ would be the first character taken into account and then n or \ would be the first count and \n would be the second?

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"... But I am confused whether \\ would be the first character taken into account and then n or \ would be the first count and \n would be the second?"

"\\" is the representation for the '\' character inside of a string literal.

Thus, The first character of the string literal "\\n" is '\' and 'n' the second.

You can make an experiment by using printf("\\n");. The output would be \n, not \(line feed).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It was a tie between you and MikeCAT. I did a toss and accepted your answer :) – user13469230 May 8 at 17:44
  • @NirajRaut The printf() experiment is good, but he forgot to mention the difference to your second case scenario. I added it to my answer. – RobertS supports Monica Cellio May 8 at 17:48
  • Yeah, that's true. – user13469230 May 8 at 17:50
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From the C Standard (6.4.4.4 Character constants)

simple-escape-sequence: one of

\' \" \? \\
\a \b \f \n \r \t \v

and

3 The single-quote ', the double-quote ", the question-mark ?, **the backslash **, and arbitrary integer values are representable according to the following table of escape sequences:

single quote ' \'
double quote " \"
question mark ? \?
backslash \ \\
octal character \octal digits
hexadecimal character \x hexadecimal digits

Thus this string literal "\\n" contains backslash and the character n.

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Try printing the string.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main(void)
{
    printf("%s","\\n");
}

\n will be printed. This means that the first character is \\ (an escape sequence that is converted to \) and the second character is n.

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0
0

"\\n" is parsed from left to right. "\\" is the escape sequence for a backslash (a single \). "n", in this case, is just an "n" and not "\n". Hence, two characters returned by strlen.

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