156

This seems trivial but after all the research and coding I can't get it to work. Conditions are:

  1. The browser window size is unknown. So please don't propose a solution involving absolute pixel sizes.
  2. The image's original dimensions are unknown, and may or may not already fit the browser window.
  3. The image is vertically and horizontally centered.
  4. The image proportions must be conserved.
  5. The image must be displayed in its entirety in the window (no cropping.)
  6. I do not wish scrollbars to appear (and they shouldn't if the image fits.)
  7. The image automatically resizes when the window dimensions change, to occupy all the available space without being larger than its original size.

Basically what I want is this:

.fit {
  max-width: 99%;
  max-height: 99%;
}
<img class="fit" src="pic.png">

The problem with the code above is that it doesn't work: the pic takes all the vertical space it needs by adding a vertical scroll bar.

At my disposal is PHP, Javascript, JQuery but I'd kill for a CSS-only solution. I don't care if it doesn't work in IE.

3
  • perraultarchitecte.com/en/projects/… This is the effect you want, right? me too!
    – user938318
    Sep 10, 2011 at 15:36
  • Thanks, that really helps me. Any suggestions what i could do to place two images side by side, keeping the resize functionality? Thank you.
    – user1300142
    Mar 29, 2012 at 7:35
  • 14
    I like your "non requirement": "I don't care if it doesn't work in IE." :)
    – Bastian
    Jun 20, 2013 at 11:23

15 Answers 15

164

Update 2018-04-11

Here's a Javascript-less, CSS-only solution. The image will dynamically be centered and resized to fit the window.

<html>
<head>
    <style>
        * {
            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;
        }
        .imgbox {
            display: grid;
            height: 100%;
        }
        .center-fit {
            max-width: 100%;
            max-height: 100vh;
            margin: auto;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="imgbox">
    <img class="center-fit" src='pic.png'>
</div>
</body>
</html>

The [other, old] solution, using JQuery, sets the height of the image container (body in the example below) so that the max-height property on the image works as expected. The image will also automatically resize when the client window is resized.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <style>
        * {
            padding: 0;
            margin: 0;
        }
        .fit { /* set relative picture size */
            max-width: 100%;
            max-height: 100%;
        }
        .center {
            display: block;
            margin: auto;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>

<img class="center fit" src="pic.jpg" >

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" language="JavaScript">
    function set_body_height() { // set body height = window height
        $('body').height($(window).height());
    }
    $(document).ready(function() {
        $(window).bind('resize', set_body_height);
        set_body_height();
    });
</script>

</body>
</html>

Note: User gutierrezalex packaged a very similar solution as a JQuery plugin on this page.

3
66

Here is a simple CSS only solution (JSFiddle), works everywhere, mobile and IE included:

CSS 2.0:

html, body {
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
}

img {
    padding: 0;
    display: block;
    margin: 0 auto;
    max-height: 100%;
    max-width: 100%;
}

HTML:

<body>
  <img src="images/your-image.png" />
</body>
4
  • 2
    Nice. But it's not vertically centered.
    – sebnukem
    Feb 13, 2016 at 14:14
  • 1
    @sebnukem: Was it supposed to be? Somehow I missed this in requirements. That's why people use screenshots/mockups. :) P.S. I don't think any of the answers provided make it vertically centered, even with JS help. Feb 13, 2016 at 14:24
  • 3
    I have tried many solutions out there, even solutions from css-tricks. Yours just perfectly works like a charm !
    – Stephan
    Jun 22, 2016 at 1:27
  • 2
    Best solution ever!
    – iVela
    Feb 23, 2018 at 11:25
30

CSS3 introduces new units that are measured relative to the viewport, which is the window in this case. These are vh and vw, which measure viewport height and width, respectively. Here is a simple CSS only solution:

img {
    max-width: 100%;
    max-height: 100vh;
    height: auto;
}

The one caveat to this is that it only works if there are no other elements contributing height on the page.

3
  • Thanks, that's great. Is it any reason why 100vh doesn't let image fit but 97vh works well?
    – Pavel
    May 17, 2017 at 0:50
  • Perhaps you have other images contributing height, such as margin and padding on the body? vh literally means the hight of the view, so if any other elements add hight to your page, the entire page will be > 100vh. Does that make sense?
    – Max
    May 17, 2017 at 4:55
  • Thank you, solved now. If anybody have same problem (.svg file renders well, but renaming it to .html causes inaccuracy): browser automatically adds <body> tag with default margin:8 even if the file hasn't <body> tag. So solution is adding <style>body{margin:0}</style>
    – Pavel
    May 17, 2017 at 15:36
17

If you are willing to put a container element around your image, a pure CSS solution is simple. You see, 99% height has no meaning when the parent element will extend vertically to contain its children. The parent needs to have a fixed height, say... the height of the viewport.

HTML

<!-- use a tall image to illustrate the problem -->
<div class='fill-screen'>
    <img class='make-it-fit' 
         src='https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f2/Leaning_Tower_of_Pisa.jpg'>
</div>

CSS

div.fill-screen {
    position: fixed;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    top: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    text-align: center;
}

img.make-it-fit {
    max-width: 99%;
    max-height: 99%;
}

Play with the fiddle.

3
  • Can you do this with a <div> instead of an <img>?
    – StevoHN
    Oct 7, 2015 at 11:58
  • @sebnukem I didn't notice that requirement before. I've updated my answer. Feb 15, 2016 at 1:17
  • This doesn't maximize my wide image's height. Feb 12, 2018 at 1:29
9

I know there's already a few answers here, but here is what I used:

max-width: 100%;
max-height: 100vh;
width: auto;
margin: auto;
5
  • 1
    I have no idea why, but this works like a charm. I'd love an explanation!
    – SeedyROM
    Jun 20, 2020 at 7:54
  • Me neither, but it was what I found after a lot of searching.
    – TomC
    Jun 22, 2020 at 10:49
  • Awesome answer :) Nov 29, 2020 at 19:43
  • Doesn't seem to center horizontally though Dec 22, 2020 at 0:41
  • yeah, wow, simple and does the job. it's still not EXACTLY what i need, but i'm adjusting my expectations. what i really want, is to force the document NOT to resize to fit a too-large image, but to simply push whatever doesn't fit off the top of the page. i can do it by generating the page with JS but that seems so hacky to me, would love a pure CSS and semantic HTML solution. Oct 12, 2021 at 22:23
6

Resize Image to Fit the Screen by the Longest Side maintaining its Aspect Ratio

img[src$="#fit"] {
    width: 100vw;
    height: auto;
    max-width: none;
    max-height: 100vh;
    object-fit: contain;
}
  • width: 100vw - image width will be 100% of view port

  • height: auto - image height will be scaled proportionally

  • max-height: 100vw - if image height would become more than view port it will be decreased to fit the screen, consequently image width will be decreased because of the following property

  • object-fit: contain - the replaced content is scaled to maintain its aspect ratio while fitting within the element's content box

    Note: object-fit is fully supported only since IE 16.0

6
  • 1
    Like that solution however you should mention that object-fit is not compatible with IE11 which is still widely used unfortunatly.
    – Blackbam
    Apr 5, 2018 at 15:36
  • @DivijSehgal then you do not need object-fit or you could explicitly use object-fit: fill; which is default.
    – am0wa
    Apr 17, 2018 at 7:06
  • What if we want to vertically center?
    – Fmstrat
    May 2, 2018 at 20:57
  • What if we want to vertically center? Just add: margin: auto;
    – cat
    Apr 3, 2019 at 18:48
  • The solution works together with html and body style from another answer: html, body { width: 100%; height: 100%; margin: 0; padding: 0; } Nov 23, 2019 at 0:30
6

Make it simple. Thanks

.bg {
  background-image: url('https://images.unsplash.com/photo-1476820865390-c52aeebb9891?ixlib=rb-1.2.1&ixid=eyJhcHBfaWQiOjEyMDd9&w=1000&q=80');
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;
  background-position: center;
  height: 100vh;
  width: 100vw;
}
<div class="bg"></div>

1
  • thanks! just adding style="height: 80vh;" in the image tag did the trick for me.
    – Tobias J.
    Apr 6, 2020 at 14:16
4

My general lazy CSS rule:

.background{
width:100%;
height:auto;
background: url('yoururl.jpg') no-repeat center;
background-position: 50% 50%;
background-size: 100% cover!important;
overflow:hidden;
}

This may zoom in on your image if it is low-res to begin with (that's to do with your image quality and size in dimensions. To center your image, you may also try (in the CSS)

display:block;    
margin: auto 0; 

to center your image

in your HTML:

<div class="background"></div>
4

For the future generations, if you want a solution that answers 1-6 and does 7 in a way that allows resize beyond to original size, I have developed a complete solution for this problem:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <body style="overflow:hidden; margin:0; text-align:center;">
    <img src="https://file-examples-com.github.io/uploads/2017/10/file_example_JPG_2500kB.jpg" style="height:100vh; max-width:100%; object-fit: contain;">
  </body>
</html>

3
width: 100%;
overflow: hidden;

I believe that should do the trick.

2
  • Hi, thanks for your answer, but it doesn't and can't logically work when the image height is greater than the window.
    – sebnukem
    May 29, 2011 at 18:51
  • 1
    Well... What is it you're intending to do? Do you wich to stretch it? Or should th eoriginal proportions be left intact (I assume this is what you want)?
    – RobinJ
    May 30, 2011 at 15:12
2

I had a similar requirement, and had to do it it basic CSS and JavaScript. No JQuery available.

This is what I got working.

<html>
      <head>
            <style>
                   img {
                          max-width: 95% !important;
                          max-height: 95% !important;
                       }
            </style>
            <script>
                   function FitImagesToScreen() {
                      var images = document.getElementsByTagName('img');
                      if(images.length > 0){
                         for(var i=0; i < images.length; i++){
                             if(images[i].width >= (window.innerWidth - 10)){
                                 images[i].style.width = 'auto';
                               }
                            }
                         }
                   }
             </script>
      </head>
      <body onload='FitImagesToScreen()'>
      ----    
      </body>
</html>

Note : I haven't used 100% for image width as there was always a bit of padding to be considered.

3
  • 2
    With CSS 3 we get the "vh" and "vw" units which are percent viewport-height and percent viewport-width respectively. simply img { max-width: 95vw; max-height: 95vh;} might be sufficient.
    – bobpaul
    Jan 31, 2016 at 7:57
  • If you can add it up as an answer might be useful for any one coming to this later. Mar 25, 2016 at 13:56
  • You can also stack multiple images in the viewable area. For two images, put two img tags into the body of the page and set max-height to 49vh. Displaying more than two images in the viewable area is left as an exercise for the reader. Mar 14, 2019 at 17:13
1
html, body{width: 99%; height: 99%; overflow: hidden}
img.fit{width: 100%; height: 100%;}

Or maybe check this out: http://css-tricks.com/how-to-resizeable-background-image/

1
  • 2
    This crops the image, so it is not acceptable. Thanks for the answer.
    – sebnukem
    May 29, 2011 at 19:02
1

Building upon @Rohit's answer, this fixes issues flagged by Chrome, reliably resizes the images, and also works for multiple images that are vertically stacked, e.g. <img src="foo.jpg"><br><img src="bar.jpg"><br><img src="baz.jpg"> There is probably a more elegant way of doing this.

<style>
    img {
        max-width: 99vw !important;
        max-height: 99vh !important;
    }
</style>
<script>
    function FitImagesToScreen() {
        var images = document.getElementsByTagName('img');
        if(images.length > 0){
            document.styleSheets[1].rules[0].style["max-height"]=((100/images.length)-1)+"vh";
            for(var i=0; i < images.length; i++){
                if(images[i].width >= (window.innerWidth - 10)){
                    images[i].style.width = 'auto';
                }
            }
        }
    }
</script>
</HEAD>
<BODY onload='FitImagesToScreen()' onresize='FitImagesToScreen()'>
<img src="foo.png">
</BODY>

0

Use this code in your style tag

<style>
html {
  background: url(imagename) no-repeat center center fixed;
  background-size: cover;
  height: 100%;
  overflow: hidden;
}
</style>
0

I found this pure CSS solution on w3 and tested it work.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<style>
body, html {
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0;
}

.bg {
  /* The image used */
  background-image: url("../yourimage.jpg");

  /* Full height */
  height: 100%; 

  /* Center and scale the image nicely */
  background-position: center;
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-size: cover;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="bg"></div>
</body>
</html>

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