41

I'm looking for a (multiplatform) way to do non-blocking console input for my C++ program, so I can handle user commands while the program continually runs. The program will also be outputting information at the same time.

What's the best/easiest way to do this? I have no problem using external libraries like boost, as long as they use a permissive license.

4
  • 2
    Could an ordinary thread library work for you? May 29 '11 at 23:40
  • @Steinbitglis: What is an "ordinary" thread library, and how does it differ from any others? May 29 '11 at 23:46
  • 2
    @Tomalak I think he meant a threading library, a not non-blocking IO library. May 29 '11 at 23:47
  • possible duplicate of Non-blocking stdio
    – Jim Lewis
    May 30 '11 at 0:16

10 Answers 10

18

Example using C++11:

#include <iostream>
#include <future>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>

static std::string getAnswer()
{    
    std::string answer;
    std::cin >> answer;
    return answer;
}

int main()
{

    std::chrono::seconds timeout(5);
    std::cout << "Do you even lift?" << std::endl << std::flush;
    std::string answer = "maybe"; //default to maybe
    std::future<std::string> future = std::async(getAnswer);
    if (future.wait_for(timeout) == std::future_status::ready)
        answer = future.get();

    std::cout << "the answer was: " << answer << std::endl;
    exit(0);
}

online compiler: https://rextester.com/GLAZ31262

4
  • Didn't know about 'future'. This is the way to do non-blocking I/O Mar 12 '19 at 8:44
  • 9
    This solution is actually misleading. std::cin in getAnswer is still blocking but you don't notice this because you call it from main and then call exit. Exit cleans up threads and flushes/closes streams. If you were to move almost the entire body from main into another function that gets called by main - as in this example: rextester.com/DIWL84093 - you will see that the function that uses a future never returns. Because std::cin still blocks and prevents that future from returning. Feb 21 '20 at 17:20
  • To clarify Ryan Jarvis' comment (because I was a bit confused): if the future.wait_for() call times out, the call to std::cin is not cancelled - it's still pending. To genuinely execute the main thread to completion without calling exit(), something must be returned from the std::cin call, or the thread will block at the point when the future object is destroyed. Putting braces around the future line and its corresponding if-statement demonstrates this.
    – x6herbius
    Aug 4 '20 at 13:35
  • This solution makes me wondering if it wouldn't be doable to spawn a new thread with a function to execute in which a blocking std::cin exists. It handles the input in another thread so that the main thread can run freely like e.g. in a while(running){} loop and "running" could be std::atomic. The threaded function can set running to false (when the user types "quit" e.g.) to tell itself and main to exit (and join properly). Would this be feasible? Any pitfalls? Mar 22 at 12:40
13

I would do this by creating separate a thread which calls normal blocking IO functions and pass it a callback function which it would call when it got input. Are you sure you need to do what you said you want to do?

As for outputting information at the same time, what would happen if the user was in the middle of typing some input and you printed something?

4
  • 1
    What would happen if I had one thread waiting for say.. cin to handle input and then another thread used cout to output the the console? Would that end badly?
    – Doug
    May 29 '11 at 23:53
  • 4
    @Doug You shouldn't really be outputting and inputting to/from the console from different threads (unless you want to have some synchronization object to keep them all in line, which would probably make the reason you were using threading in the first place go down the drain). I haven't tried it before, but I imagine that if you print something from one thread while another thread is waiting for input and the user hits enter, the one waiting for input will get what the other one outputted as part of the input. So things can get messy. Like I said, I haven't tried it though. May 29 '11 at 23:58
  • @Doug: That would be fine. Just make sure both threads to not try to use the same stream concurrently.
    – Nemo
    May 29 '11 at 23:59
  • 4
    I ended up using threading and input and output queues with a pair of mutexes. The thread handles all console i/o.
    – Doug
    May 30 '11 at 6:15
5

I've done this on QNX4.5 that doesn't support threads or Boost by using select. You basically pass select STDIN as the file descriptor to use and select will return when a new line is entered. I've added a simplified example loop below. It's platform independent, at least for Unix like systems. Not sure about Windows though.

while (!g_quit)
{
   //we want to receive data from stdin so add these file
   //descriptors to the file descriptor set. These also have to be reset
   //within the loop since select modifies the sets.
   FD_ZERO(&read_fds);
   FD_SET(STDIN_FILENO, &read_fds);

   result = select(sfd + 1, &read_fds, NULL, NULL, NULL);
   if (result == -1 && errno != EINTR)
   {
      cerr << "Error in select: " << strerror(errno) << "\n";
      break;
   }
   else if (result == -1 && errno == EINTR)
   {
      //we've received and interrupt - handle this
      ....
   }
   else
   {
      if (FD_ISSET(STDIN_FILENO, &read_fds))
      {
         process_cmd(sfd);
      }
   }
}
2
  • Select is my favorite. Could run on cygwin or minsys lib on windows. It must work, I think. I'll give it a try and post the result.
    – minghua
    Sep 11 '13 at 14:07
  • @NadavB it is of type fd_set. Oct 19 '18 at 16:42
4

There is one easy way:

char buffer[512];
int point = 0;
...
while (_kbhit()) {
    char cur = _getch();
    if (point > 511) point = 511;
    std::cout << cur;
    if (cur != 13) buffer[point++] = cur;
    else{
        buffer[point] = '\0';
        point = 0;
        //Run(buffer);
    }
}

No block, all in 1 thread. As for me, this works.

1
  • 2
    problem: thats just a hack, _kbhit() returns only true if you use your hardware keyboard. If the input to your program comes from another process then _kbhit() blocks. Jun 16 '17 at 17:13
4

Non-blocking console input C++ ?

Ans: do console IO on a background thread and provide a means of communicating between threads.

Here's a complete (but simplistic) test program that implements async io by deferring the io to a background thread.

the program will wait for you to enter strings (terminate with newline) on the console and then perform a 10-second operation with that string.

you can enter another string while the operation is in progress.

enter 'quit' to get the program to stop on the next cycle.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <string>
#include <future>
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>
#include <deque>

int main()
{
    std::mutex m;
    std::condition_variable cv;
    std::string new_string;
    bool error = false;

    auto io_thread = std::thread([&]{
        std::string s;
        while(!error && std::getline(std::cin, s, '\n'))
        {
            auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(m);
            new_string = std::move(s);
            if (new_string == "quit") {
                error = true;
            }
            lock.unlock();
            cv.notify_all();
        }
        auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(m);
        error = true;
        lock.unlock();
        cv.notify_all();
    });

    auto current_string = std::string();
    for ( ;; )
    {
        auto lock = std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(m);
        cv.wait(lock, [&] { return error || (current_string != new_string); });
        if (error)
        {
            break;
        }
        current_string = new_string;
        lock.unlock();

        // now use the string that arrived from our non-blocking stream
        std::cout << "new string: " << current_string;
        std::cout.flush();
        for (int i = 0 ; i < 10 ; ++i) {
            std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::seconds(1));
            std::cout << " " << i;
            std::cout.flush();
        }
        std::cout << ". done. next?\n";
        std::cout.flush();
    }
    io_thread.join();
    return 0;
}

sample test run:

$ ./async.cpp
first
new string: first 0 1las 2t 3
 4 5 6 7 8 9. done. next?
new string: last 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8quit 9. done. next?
2
  • 6
    how would you signal the io_thread to quit without "quit"? getline is blocking
    – dashesy
    Oct 20 '16 at 1:22
  • @dashesy If my requirements were more complex than this, i'd probably use some platform-specific code for the I/O. Oct 20 '16 at 7:01
2

ncurses can be a good candidate.

0

The StdinDataIO class of the BSD-licensed MUSCLE networking library supports non-blocking reads from stdin under Windows, MacOS/X, and Linux/Unix ... you could use that (or just examine the code as an example of how it can be done) if you want.

0

You can use the tinycon library to do this. Just spawn a tinycon object in a new thread, and you are pretty much done. You can define the trigger method to fire off whatever you'd like when enter is pressed.

You can find it here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/tinycon/

Also, the license is BSD, so it will be the most permissive for your needs.

0

libuv is a cross-platform C library for asynchronous I/O. It uses an event loop to do things like read from standard input without blocking the thread. libuv is what powers Node.JS and others.

0

In a sense, this answer is incomplete. But yet, I think it can be useful even for people who have different platforms or circumstances, giving the idea, what to look for in their platform.

As I just wrote some scripting engine integration into an SDL2 main event loop (which is supposed to read lines from stdin if there are lines to be read), here is how I did it (on linux (debian bullseye 64 bit)). See below.

But even if you are not on linux, but on some other posix system, you can use the equivalent platform APIs of your platform. For example, you can use kqueue on FreeBSD. Or you can consider using libevent for a bit more portable approach (still will not really work on Windows).

This approach might also work on Windows if you do some special fiddling with the rather new-ish ConPTY. In traditional windows console applications, the problem is, that stdin is not a real file handle and as such, passing it to libevent or using IOCP (IO completion ports) on it will not work as expected.

But, this approach should also work on posix systems, if there is redirection at play. As long as there is a file handle available.

So how does it work?

  1. Use epoll_wait() to detect if there is data available on stdin. While consoles can be configured in all sorts of ways, typically, they operate on a line by line basis (should also apply for ssh etc.).
  2. Use your favorite getline() function to read the line from stdin. Which will work, because you know, there is data and it will not block (unless your console is not defaulting to line by line handling).
  3. Rince and repeat.
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/epoll.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <array>

using EpollEvent_t = struct epoll_event;

int main(int argc, const char* argv[]) {
  //
  // create epoll instance
  //
  int epollfd = epoll_create1(0);
  if (epollfd < 0) {
    std::cout << "epoll_create1(0) failed!" << std::endl;
    return -1;
  }

  //
  // associate stdin with epoll
  //
  EpollEvent_t ev;
  ev.data.ptr = nullptr;
  ev.data.fd = STDIN_FILENO; // from unistd.h
  ev.data.u32 = UINT32_C(0);
  ev.data.u64 = UINT64_C(0);
  ev.events = EPOLLIN;
  if (epoll_ctl(epollfd, EPOLL_CTL_ADD, STDIN_FILENO, &ev) < 0) {
    std::cout
      << "epoll_ctl(epollfd, EPOLL_CTL_ADD, fdin, &ev) failed."
      << std::endl;
    return -1;
  }

  //
  // do non-blocking line processing in your free running
  // main loop
  //
  std::array<EpollEvent_t,1> events;
  bool running = true;
  while (running) {
    int waitret = epoll_wait(epollfd,
                 events.data(),
                 events.size(),
                 0); // 0 is the "timeout" we want
    if (waitret < 0) {
      std::cout << "epoll_wait() failed." << std::endl;
      running = false;
    }
    if (0 < waitret) { // there is data on stdin!
      std::string line;
      std::getline(std::cin, line);
      std::cout
    << "line read: [" << line << "]" << std::endl;
      if (line == "quit")
    running = false;
    }

      // ... Do what you usually do in your main loop ...
  }

  //
  // cleanup of epoll etc.
  //
  close(epollfd);
    
    
  return 0;
}

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