18

I have url like:

sftp://user@host.net/some/random/path

I want to extract user, host and path from this string. Any part can be random length.

  • Which shell? How have you tried to do this so far? – Johnsyweb May 30 '11 at 9:04
  • Do you have to use a shell script? I'm presuming BASH. can you use python instead? – Flukey May 30 '11 at 9:08
  • 1
    I'm trying to write custom nautilus shell script to open new ssh session in terminal from current sftp session in nautilus on Ubuntu. This url is $NAUTILUS_SCRIPT_CURRENT_URI global bariable. But actually, you are right, maybe I can use python or PHP. – umpirsky May 30 '11 at 9:19
  • 1
    I agree with the comments above - using perl/python/php would ease things a lot. (Posting this after providing a bash-solution) – Shirkrin May 30 '11 at 9:26
  • Second part of the question stackoverflow.com/questions/6174906/… – umpirsky May 30 '11 at 10:07

11 Answers 11

10

Using Python (best tool for this job, IMHO):

#!/usr/bin/env python

import os
from urlparse import urlparse

uri = os.environ['NAUTILUS_SCRIPT_CURRENT_URI']
result = urlparse(uri)
user, host = result.netloc.split('@')
path = result.path
print('user=', user)
print('host=', host)
print('path=', path)

Further reading:

  • Added os.system("gnome-terminal --execute /usr/bin/ssh " + user + "@" + host) at the bottom to do the work ;) – umpirsky May 30 '11 at 9:42
  • @umpiresky: Delighted to hear it. I've update my answer with some links in case you need to customise it. – Johnsyweb May 30 '11 at 9:43
  • @umpiresky: That wasn't a part of the question! In that case, you can use [...]ssh result.netloc to save splitting the user from the host only to join them back together... (and do away with the print calls.) – Johnsyweb May 30 '11 at 9:45
  • @Johnsyweb Sure, will do that. I'm just wondering how to set current directory when I ssh.. – umpirsky May 30 '11 at 9:53
  • That's a new question. Don't forget to specify whether you want to set the CWD on the local or the remote host. – Johnsyweb May 30 '11 at 9:54
38

[EDIT 2019] This answer is not meant to be a catch-all, works for everything solution it was intended to provide a simple alternative to the python based version and it ended up having more features than the original.


It answered the basic question in a bash-only way and then was modified multiple times by myself to include a hand full of demands by commenters. I think at this point however adding even more complexity would make it unmaintainable. I know not all things are straight forward (checking for a valid port for example requires comparing hostport and host) but I would rather not add even more complexity.


[Original answer]

Assuming your URL is passed as first parameter to the script:

#!/bin/bash

# extract the protocol
proto="$(echo $1 | grep :// | sed -e's,^\(.*://\).*,\1,g')"
# remove the protocol
url="$(echo ${1/$proto/})"
# extract the user (if any)
user="$(echo $url | grep @ | cut -d@ -f1)"
# extract the host and port
hostport="$(echo ${url/$user@/} | cut -d/ -f1)"
# by request host without port    
host="$(echo $hostport | sed -e 's,:.*,,g')"
# by request - try to extract the port
port="$(echo $hostport | sed -e 's,^.*:,:,g' -e 's,.*:\([0-9]*\).*,\1,g' -e 's,[^0-9],,g')"
# extract the path (if any)
path="$(echo $url | grep / | cut -d/ -f2-)"

echo "url: $url"
echo "  proto: $proto"
echo "  user: $user"
echo "  host: $host"
echo "  port: $port"
echo "  path: $path"

I must admit this is not the cleanest solution but it doesn't rely on another scripting language like perl or python. (Providing a solution using one of them would produce cleaner results ;) )

Using your example the results are:

url: user@host.net/some/random/path
  proto: sftp://
  user: user
  host: host.net
  port:
  path: some/random/path

This will also work for URLs without a protocol/username or path. In this case the respective variable will contain an empty string.

[EDIT]
If your bash version won't cope with the substitutions (${1/$proto/}) try this:

#!/bin/bash

# extract the protocol
proto="$(echo $1 | grep :// | sed -e's,^\(.*://\).*,\1,g')"

# remove the protocol -- updated
url=$(echo $1 | sed -e s,$proto,,g)

# extract the user (if any)
user="$(echo $url | grep @ | cut -d@ -f1)"

# extract the host and port -- updated
hostport=$(echo $url | sed -e s,$user@,,g | cut -d/ -f1)

# by request host without port
host="$(echo $hostport | sed -e 's,:.*,,g')"
# by request - try to extract the port
port="$(echo $hostport | sed -e 's,^.*:,:,g' -e 's,.*:\([0-9]*\).*,\1,g' -e 's,[^0-9],,g')"

# extract the path (if any)
path="$(echo $url | grep / | cut -d/ -f2-)"
  • Wow, this looks great. But I got test: 6: Bad substitution test: 10: Bad substitution url: proto: sftp:// user: host: path: – umpirsky May 30 '11 at 9:31
  • My bad - I corrected the original sample (replace ${1/$proto} with ${1/$proto/}) – Shirkrin May 30 '11 at 9:37
  • 1
    @Coyote updated to extract the port (which is slightly more complex..) – Shirkrin Jul 5 '16 at 6:23
  • 1
    @ñull what it should in your view and what the solution was designed to do are not the same. This has and will never provide the host without the port. – Shirkrin May 28 '19 at 10:53
  • 1
    @ñull it’s an interesting way to complain that you want a change. Now it has a hostport and host but originally I expected people to be able to come up with changes on their own after reading it. My bash sample already does more than the accepted python answer. – Shirkrin Jun 14 '19 at 10:22
21

The above, refined (added password and port parsing), and working in /bin/sh:

# extract the protocol
proto="`echo $DATABASE_URL | grep '://' | sed -e's,^\(.*://\).*,\1,g'`"
# remove the protocol
url=`echo $DATABASE_URL | sed -e s,$proto,,g`

# extract the user and password (if any)
userpass="`echo $url | grep @ | cut -d@ -f1`"
pass=`echo $userpass | grep : | cut -d: -f2`
if [ -n "$pass" ]; then
    user=`echo $userpass | grep : | cut -d: -f1`
else
    user=$userpass
fi

# extract the host -- updated
hostport=`echo $url | sed -e s,$userpass@,,g | cut -d/ -f1`
port=`echo $hostport | grep : | cut -d: -f2`
if [ -n "$port" ]; then
    host=`echo $hostport | grep : | cut -d: -f1`
else
    host=$hostport
fi

# extract the path (if any)
path="`echo $url | grep / | cut -d/ -f2-`"

Posted b/c I needed it, so I wrote it (based on @Shirkin's answer, obviously), and I figured someone else might appreciate it.

6

This solution in principle works the same as Adam Ryczkowski's, in this thread - but has improved regular expression based on RFC3986, (with some changes) and fixes some errors (e.g. userinfo can contain '_' character). This can also understand relative URIs (e.g. to extract query or fragment).

# !/bin/bash

# Following regex is based on https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3986#appendix-B with
# additional sub-expressions to split authority into userinfo, host and port
#
readonly URI_REGEX='^(([^:/?#]+):)?(//((([^:/?#]+)@)?([^:/?#]+)(:([0-9]+))?))?(/([^?#]*))(\?([^#]*))?(#(.*))?'
#                    ↑↑            ↑  ↑↑↑            ↑         ↑ ↑            ↑ ↑        ↑  ↑        ↑ ↑
#                    |2 scheme     |  ||6 userinfo   7 host    | 9 port       | 11 rpath |  13 query | 15 fragment
#                    1 scheme:     |  |5 userinfo@             8 :…           10 path    12 ?…       14 #…
#                                  |  4 authority
#                                  3 //…

parse_scheme () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[2]}"
}

parse_authority () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[4]}"
}

parse_user () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[6]}"
}

parse_host () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[7]}"
}

parse_port () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[9]}"
}

parse_path () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[10]}"
}

parse_rpath () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[11]}"
}

parse_query () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[13]}"
}

parse_fragment () {
    [[ "$@" =~ $URI_REGEX ]] && echo "${BASH_REMATCH[15]}"
}
  • 1
    Isn't this running that regex for EACH part of the URL you're trying to parse? Adam's method may not have the perfect regex, but it only matches the pattern once. – Auspex Sep 5 '17 at 13:33
  • Yes, it does - of course, if you want to obtain more than one value from URI (as in the original question), then it's appropriate extract exact strings from BASH_REMATCH array (if you care more about speed than readability), exactly as @adam-ryczkowski did. – Patryk Obara Sep 5 '17 at 13:59
  • Thanks. Anyway, I used the regex for an application I have running in a docker container, where I didn't want to have to modify somebody else's docker image just to get sed... – Auspex Sep 6 '17 at 14:23
4

Here's my take, loosely based on some of the existing answers, but it can also cope with GitHub SSH clone URLs:

#!/bin/bash

PROJECT_URL="git@github.com:heremaps/here-aaa-java-sdk.git"

# Extract the protocol (includes trailing "://").
PARSED_PROTO="$(echo $PROJECT_URL | sed -nr 's,^(.*://).*,\1,p')"

# Remove the protocol from the URL.
PARSED_URL="$(echo ${PROJECT_URL/$PARSED_PROTO/})"

# Extract the user (includes trailing "@").
PARSED_USER="$(echo $PARSED_URL | sed -nr 's,^(.*@).*,\1,p')"

# Remove the user from the URL.
PARSED_URL="$(echo ${PARSED_URL/$PARSED_USER/})"

# Extract the port (includes leading ":").
PARSED_PORT="$(echo $PARSED_URL | sed -nr 's,.*(:[0-9]+).*,\1,p')"

# Remove the port from the URL.
PARSED_URL="$(echo ${PARSED_URL/$PARSED_PORT/})"

# Extract the path (includes leading "/" or ":").
PARSED_PATH="$(echo $PARSED_URL | sed -nr 's,[^/:]*([/:].*),\1,p')"

# Remove the path from the URL.
PARSED_HOST="$(echo ${PARSED_URL/$PARSED_PATH/})"

echo "proto: $PARSED_PROTO"
echo "user: $PARSED_USER"
echo "host: $PARSED_HOST"
echo "port: $PARSED_PORT"
echo "path: $PARSED_PATH"

which gives

proto:
user: git@
host: github.com
port:
path: :heremaps/here-aaa-java-sdk.git

And for PROJECT_URL="ssh://sschuberth@git.eclipse.org:29418/jgit/jgit" you get

proto: ssh://
user: sschuberth@
host: git.eclipse.org
port: :29418
path: /jgit/jgit
3

If you really want to do it in shell, you can do something as simple as the following by using awk. This requires knowing how many fields you will actually be passed (e.g. no password sometimes and not others).

#!/bin/bash

FIELDS=($(echo "sftp://user@host.net/some/random/path" \
  | awk '{split($0, arr, /[\/\@:]*/); for (x in arr) { print arr[x] }}'))
proto=${FIELDS[1]}
user=${FIELDS[2]}
host=${FIELDS[3]}
path=$(echo ${FIELDS[@]:3} | sed 's/ /\//g')

If you don't have awk and you do have grep, and you can require that each field have at least two characters and be reasonably predictable in format, then you can do:

#!/bin/bash

FIELDS=($(echo "sftp://user@host.net/some/random/path" \
   | grep -o "[a-z0-9.-][a-z0-9.-]*" | tr '\n' ' '))
proto=${FIELDS[1]}
user=${FIELDS[2]}
host=${FIELDS[3]}
path=$(echo ${FIELDS[@]:3} | sed 's/ /\//g')
2

Just needed to do the same, so was curious if it's possible to do it in single line, and this is what i've got:

#!/bin/bash

parse_url() {
  eval $(echo "$1" | sed -e "s#^\(\(.*\)://\)\?\(\([^:@]*\)\(:\(.*\)\)\?@\)\?\([^/?]*\)\(/\(.*\)\)\?#${PREFIX:-URL_}SCHEME='\2' ${PREFIX:-URL_}USER='\4' ${PREFIX:-URL_}PASSWORD='\6' ${PREFIX:-URL_}HOST='\7' ${PREFIX:-URL_}PATH='\9'#")
}

URL=${1:-"http://user:pass@example.com/path/somewhere"}
PREFIX="URL_" parse_url "$URL"
echo "$URL_SCHEME://$URL_USER:$URL_PASSWORD@$URL_HOST/$URL_PATH"

How it works:

  1. There is that crazy sed regex that captures all the parts of url, when all of them are optional (except for the host name)
  2. Using those capture groups sed outputs env variables names with their values for relevant parts (like URL_SCHEME or URL_USER)
  3. eval executes that output, causing those variables to be exported and available in the script
  4. Optionally PREFIX could be passed to control output env variables names

PS: be careful when using this for arbitrary input since this code is vulnerable to script injections.

  • Unfortunately the port part is not supported. – ñull May 28 '19 at 10:34
1

I did further parsing, expanding the solution given by @Shirkrin:

#!/bin/bash

parse_url() {
    local query1 query2 path1 path2

    # extract the protocol
    proto="$(echo $1 | grep :// | sed -e's,^\(.*://\).*,\1,g')"

    if [[ ! -z $proto ]] ; then
            # remove the protocol
            url="$(echo ${1/$proto/})"

            # extract the user (if any)
            login="$(echo $url | grep @ | cut -d@ -f1)"

            # extract the host
            host="$(echo ${url/$login@/} | cut -d/ -f1)"

            # by request - try to extract the port
            port="$(echo $host | sed -e 's,^.*:,:,g' -e 's,.*:\([0-9]*\).*,\1,g' -e 's,[^0-9],,g')"

            # extract the uri (if any)
            resource="/$(echo $url | grep / | cut -d/ -f2-)"
    else
            url=""
            login=""
            host=""
            port=""
            resource=$1
    fi

    # extract the path (if any)
    path1="$(echo $resource | grep ? | cut -d? -f1 )"
    path2="$(echo $resource | grep \# | cut -d# -f1 )"
    path=$path1
    if [[ -z $path ]] ; then path=$path2 ; fi
    if [[ -z $path ]] ; then path=$resource ; fi

    # extract the query (if any)
    query1="$(echo $resource | grep ? | cut -d? -f2-)"
    query2="$(echo $query1 | grep \# | cut -d\# -f1 )"
    query=$query2
    if [[ -z $query ]] ; then query=$query1 ; fi

    # extract the fragment (if any)
    fragment="$(echo $resource | grep \# | cut -d\# -f2 )"

    echo "url: $url"
    echo "   proto: $proto"
    echo "   login: $login"
    echo "    host: $host"
    echo "    port: $port"
    echo "resource: $resource"
    echo "    path: $path"
    echo "   query: $query"
    echo "fragment: $fragment"
    echo ""
}

parse_url "http://login:password@example.com:8080/one/more/dir/file.exe?a=sth&b=sth#anchor_fragment"
parse_url "https://example.com/one/more/dir/file.exe#anchor_fragment"
parse_url "http://login:password@example.com:8080/one/more/dir/file.exe#anchor_fragment"
parse_url "ftp://user@example.com:8080/one/more/dir/file.exe?a=sth&b=sth"
parse_url "/one/more/dir/file.exe"
parse_url "file.exe"
parse_url "file.exe#anchor"
1

I did not like above methods and wrote my own. It is for ftp link, just replace ftp with http if your need it. First line is a small validation of link, link should look like ftp://user:pass@host.com/path/to/something.

if ! echo "$url" | grep -q '^[[:blank:]]*ftp://[[:alnum:]]\+:[[:alnum:]]\+@[[:alnum:]\.]\+/.*[[:blank:]]*$'; then return 1; fi

login=$(  echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\1|' )
pass=$(   echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\2|' )
host=$(   echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\3|' )
dir=$(    echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\4|' )

My actual goal was to check ftp access by url. Here is the full result:

#!/bin/bash

test_ftp_url()  # lftp may hang on some ftp problems, like no connection
    {
    local url="$1"

    if ! echo "$url" | grep -q '^[[:blank:]]*ftp://[[:alnum:]]\+:[[:alnum:]]\+@[[:alnum:]\.]\+/.*[[:blank:]]*$'; then return 1; fi

    local login=$(  echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\1|' )
    local pass=$(   echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\2|' )
    local host=$(   echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\3|' )
    local dir=$(    echo "$url" | sed 's|[[:blank:]]*ftp://\([^:]\+\):\([^@]\+\)@\([^/]\+\)\(/.*\)[[:blank:]]*|\4|' )

    exec 3>&2 2>/dev/null
    exec 6<>"/dev/tcp/$host/21" || { exec 2>&3 3>&-; echo 'Bash network support is disabled. Skipping ftp check.'; return 0; }

    read <&6
    if ! echo "${REPLY//$'\r'}" | grep -q '^220'; then exec 2>&3  3>&- 6>&-; return 3; fi   # 220 vsFTPd 3.0.2+ (ext.1) ready...

    echo -e "USER $login\r" >&6; read <&6
    if ! echo "${REPLY//$'\r'}" | grep -q '^331'; then exec 2>&3  3>&- 6>&-; return 4; fi   # 331 Please specify the password.

    echo -e "PASS $pass\r" >&6; read <&6
    if ! echo "${REPLY//$'\r'}" | grep -q '^230'; then exec 2>&3  3>&- 6>&-; return 5; fi   # 230 Login successful.

    echo -e "CWD $dir\r" >&6; read <&6
    if ! echo "${REPLY//$'\r'}" | grep -q '^250'; then exec 2>&3  3>&- 6>&-; return 6; fi   # 250 Directory successfully changed.

    echo -e "QUIT\r" >&6

    exec 2>&3  3>&- 6>&-
    return 0
    }

test_ftp_url 'ftp://fz223free:fz223free@ftp.zakupki.gov.ru/out/nsi/nsiProtocol/daily'
echo "$?"
1

If you have access to Bash >= 3.0 you can do this in pure bash as well, thanks to the re-match operator =~:

pattern='^(([[:alnum:]]+)://)?(([[:alnum:]]+)@)?([^:^@]+)(:([[:digit:]]+))?$'
if [[ "http://us@cos.com:3142" =~ $pattern ]]; then
        proto=${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
        user=${BASH_REMATCH[4]}
        host=${BASH_REMATCH[5]}
        port=${BASH_REMATCH[7]}
fi

It should be faster and less resource-hungry then all the previous examples, because no external process is be spawned.

  • 1
    Unfortunately this would include path segment as part of the host name. – Yan Foto Aug 15 '19 at 12:50
0

If you have access to Node.js:

export MY_URI=sftp://user@host.net/some/random/path
node -e "console.log(url.parse(process.env.MY_URI).user)"
node -e "console.log(url.parse(process.env.MY_URI).host)"
node -e "console.log(url.parse(process.env.MY_URI).path)"

This will output:

user
host.net
/some/random/path

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