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![State.initState() must be a void method without an async keyword. how can i solve this probelms]1

how to solve this problem

@override
  Future<void> initState() async {
    // TODO: implement initState
    super.initState();
    _current_location();
    BitmapDescriptor.fromAssetImage(
        ImageConfiguration(devicePixelRatio: 2.5),
        'assets/fff.png').then((onValue) {
      pinLocationIcon = onValue;
    });
    //createCustomMarker(context);

   // final Marker marker = Marker(icon: BitmapDescriptor.fromBytes(markerIcon));
    DatabaseReference ref = FirebaseDatabase.instance.reference();
    ref.child('users').once().then((DataSnapshot snapshot) {
      Map<dynamic, dynamic> values = snapshot.value;
      print(values.toString());
      values.forEach((k, v) {
        allMarkers.add(Marker(
          markerId: MarkerId(k),
          draggable: false,
          icon: pinLocationIcon,
          position: LatLng(v["latitude"], v["longitude"]),
          infoWindow: InfoWindow(title: v["name"]),
          onTap: () {
            _onMarkerTapped(v["name"]);
          },
        ),);
      });
    });
  }
3
  • Probably you are trying to run an async function(a http request with await probably?) in initstate which you can't do this directly. If you send your code we can help more.
    – Lunedor
    May 13, 2020 at 0:55
  • Create a separate async function returning Future and then call that function inside initState. May 13, 2020 at 1:08
  • the question its updated May 13, 2020 at 1:28

1 Answer 1

35

initState must be a method which takes no parameters and returns void. This is because it is overriding the method of the same name in the superclass (either StatelessWidget or State<StatefulWidgetType>. As such, this limitation is a contract which is fixed and binding; you cannot change it.

Of course, this also means that initState cannot be marked as async. This is because any method marked as async will implicitly return a Future, but if the method returns anything, then it cannot have a return type of void which breaks the override contract.

If you need to call an async method from within initState, you can do so simply by not awaiting it:

@override
void initState() {
  super.initState();
  
  doSomeAsyncStuff();
}

Future<void> doSomeAsyncStuff() async {
  ...
}

If, however, you need the data from the async method for your widget, you cannot simply wait for the Future to return before you build the widget. Flutter does not allow this, because there is no telling how long it will take for the Future to return, and stalling the widget building until then could potentially block your entire app.

Instead, you need to have your widget build normally and then have a way to notify your widget to update when the Future has returned. This is most easily done with a FutureBuilder:

@override
Widget build(BuildContext context) {
  return FutureBuilder(
    future: doSomeAsyncStuff(),
    builder: (context, snapshot) {
      if (!snapshot.hasData) {
        // Future hasn't finished yet, return a placeholder
        return Text('Loading');
      }
      return Text('Loading Complete: ${snapshot.data}');
    }
  );
}

(Notice how instead of calling the async method from initState, I am calling it from the FutureBuilder during the build process.)


EDIT: As pointed out, this approach only works in OP's situation where the awaited future will always eventually return a value. This is not always the case - sometimes the future doesn't return a value at all and is just a long-running process. Sometimes the future might return null instead of concrete data. And sometimes the future may result in an error instead of completing successfully. In any of these cases, snapshot.data will be null after the future completes, in which case snapshot.hasData will always be false.

In these situations, instead of depending on snapshot.hasData to wait for data to appear, you can use snapshot.connectionState to monitor the state of the future itself:

@override
Widget build(BuildContext context) {
 return FutureBuilder(
   future: doSomeAsyncStuff(),
   builder: (context, snapshot) {
     if (snapshot.connectionState != ConnectionState.done) {
       // Future hasn't finished yet, return a placeholder
       return Text('Loading');
     }
     return Text('Loading Complete');
   }
 );
}
5
  • 1
    Great answer. I suppose the latter is better practice, than a fire-and-forget future? By the way, there's an extra dot in your last snippet (third last line).
    – Jeppe
    Mar 14, 2021 at 10:21
  • 1
    I'm a newbie. But according to my practice, use snapshot.connectionState = ConnectionState.done works, cause snapshot.hasData seems always false to me.
    – Vincent
    Apr 28, 2021 at 10:02
  • 1
    @Vincent snapshot.hasData will be true when snapshot.data is not null. If the future you are waiting on doesn't actually return anything or has a chance of returning null, then snapshot.hasData can be false even after the future completes, in which case you should use snapshot.connectionState instead.
    – Abion47
    Apr 28, 2021 at 16:00
  • @Abion47 Can I safely use: doSomeAsyncStuff().then((result) => //use result); in initState()? Nov 14, 2021 at 10:33
  • @AliFELLAHI Yes, you can use that as long as you don't try to await it.
    – Abion47
    Nov 14, 2021 at 19:54

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