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So I have a mysql Docker up and running with 3 log files (general, error, slow-query log) enabled, that are written to /var/log/mysql/ (path inside the mysql container), which actually is a directory on the docker host (named 'log') and mounted into the container as a volume specified in the docker-compose.yml.

We chose this way, because we didn't want general and slow-query logs combined on stdout and we prefer a daily rotation of the 3 separate log files, since it seems more comfortable to us to find a certain query that was issued - let's say - 4 days ago.

Since the mysql Docker (afaik) doesn't come with logrotate and/or cron, we decided to have another service in the docker-compose.yml named logrotator, which starts cron in it's entrypoint, which in turn regularly runs logrotate with a given logrotate.conf. The 'log' directory is also mounted into the logrotator container, so it can do it's rotation job on the mysql log files.

Now it seems like mysql needs a "mysqladmin flush-logs" after each rotation to start writing into a new file descriptor, but the logrotator container cannot issue this command inside the mysql container.

To make it short(er): I'm sure there are better ways to accomplish separate log files with log rotation. Just how? Any ideas are much appreciated. Thanks.

Update:

Since we're using mysql 5.7 as of now, and hence probably cannot solve our issue by the solution as proposed by @buaacss (which might absolutely work), we decided to stay with a "cron" container. Additionally we installed docker.io inside the cron container and mounted the docker host's /var/run/docker.sock into the cron container. This allows us to use "docker exec" to issue commands (in this case 'mysqladmin flush-logs') from the cron container to be executed in the mysql container. Problem solved.

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you can indeed use SIGHUP instead of flush log statement based on doc

https://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/log-file-maintenance.html

but may have some undesired effects, i.e. write huge report information to the error log.

so, as I mentioned in comment, they developed a light version of SIGHUP, i.e. SIGUSR1 to accomplish functions below

FR1: When SIGUSR1 is sent to the server, it must flush the error log.

FR2: When SIGUSR1 is sent to the server, it must flush the general log.

FR3: When SIGUSR1 is sent to the server, it must flush the slow query log.

FR4: SIGUSR1 must not send MySQL status report. 
Currently when SIGHUP is sent to the server a large report of information is 
printed to stdout, the status report. 

FR5: The server must not fail when SIGUSR1 is sent, even though slow log is not 
enabled.

FR6: The server must not fail when SIGUSR1 is sent, even though slow log output 
is set to a table (log_output).

FR7: The server must not fail when SIGUSR1 is sent, even though general log is 
set to OFF.

NFR1: SIGALRM must be undisguisable from how SIGUSR1 behaved before. 

unfortunately such signal is only available in MySQL 8 or above

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