71

Most of the examples I found on the net write this:

if(x != nil)
    // ...

Is there any problems with this?

if(x)
    // ...

I tried both in a simple program and couldn't found any difference.

123

In Objective-C, nil is defined as a value called __DARWIN_NULL, which essentially evaluates to 0 or false in if-statements. Therefore, writing if (x == nil) is the same as writing if (!x) and writing if (x != nil) is equal to if (x) (since comparing to false creates a negation, and comparing to true keeps the condition the same).


You can write your code either way, and it really depends on which you think is more readable. I find if (x) to make more sense, but it depends on your style.

It's like comparing if (someCondition == true) versus if (someCondition).
It all depends on you, and who's going to be reading the code.


Edit: As Yuji correctly mentions, since Objective-C is a superset of C, any condition that evaluates to a value other than 0 is considered to be true, and therefore, if someCondition in the example above were to evaluate to an integer value of, say, -1, comparing it to true would result in false, and the if-statement would not be evaluated. Something to be aware of.

  • 12
    I should add that if(someCondition==true) is discouraged, because in C-derived languages, any value other than 0 can be in principle regarded as a Boolean true value, but due to historical reasons if someCondition is -1 and true is defined as 1 then someCondition==true evaluates to false. – Yuji May 30 '11 at 15:05
  • @Yuji, that is correct. I was trying to imply though, that someCondition evaluates to a boolean, but that is an important warning. – Itai Ferber May 30 '11 at 15:13
  • Check the section "working with nil" in the Apple docs: developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… . As they say, both forms are fine. However, beware that there subtle and treacherous issues if you try to cast an Obj-C reference to BOOL, as described in mikeash.com/pyblog/… – algal Feb 20 '13 at 22:12
  • 1
    so if x==0; would if(x) and if(x!=nil) behave the same? – erik Jul 30 '14 at 14:55
  • @erik Yes, they should. nil is essentially equal to 0, so those conditions evaluate to to if (0) and if (0 != 0), both of which are false. – Itai Ferber Jul 30 '14 at 21:08
8

Both

if (x != nil)

and

if ( x )

are equivalent, so pick the variant that in your opinion makes your code more readable for you (and others who will read and support your code)

0

Both are the same and this is a style question and it boils down to whether you prefer:

  1. if (something) { ... }

    versus

  2. if (something != nothing) { ... }

I have always found #1 more clear but #2 is used extensively in documentation and hence the field so it is better to both know both forms and adapt to what a project uses and be stylistically consistent.

0

The best and safe way to check nil is
Make a common method, and add all these null :

+ (NSString *)trimWhiteSpaceAndNewLine:(NSString *)string {
    NSString *stringSource = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",string];
    if ([stringSource isEqualToString:@"(null)"]) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    if ([stringSource isEqualToString:@"<null>"]) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    if ([stringSource isEqualToString:@"<nil>"]) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    if ([stringSource isKindOfClass:[NSNull class]]) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    if ([stringSource isEqualToString:@""]) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    if (stringSource == nil) {
        stringSource = @"";
        return stringSource;
    }
    NSString *stringFinal = [stringSource stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]];
    return stringFinal;
}  

And check

NSString *strUuid = [Common trimWhiteSpaceAndNewLine:[dict valueForKeyPath:@"detail.uuid"]];
        if (![strUuid isEqualToString:@""]) {
            // do your stuff
        }
-3
if([yourNullObject isKindOfClass:[NSNull class]]){
    //if it is null
}else{
    //if it is not null
}

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