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This question already has an answer here:

I'm trying to horizontally center a <div> block element on a page and have it set to a minimum width. What is the simplest way to do this? I want the <div> element to be inline with rest of my page. I'll try to draw an example:

page text page text page text page text
page text page text page text page text
               -------
               | div |
               -------
page text page text page text page text
page text page text page text page text

marked as duplicate by TylerH css Sep 28 '18 at 0:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • I don't like any of these answers. What's the solution if you don't know the width? It could just be a single word for example. – RGBK Dec 7 '11 at 1:10
  • 1
    And the point to note is aligning will have no effect if the width is 100% – Amol M Kulkarni May 31 '13 at 14:09
  • 1
    I just find out that webgenerator: howtocenterincss.com It does for: you whatever you try to center, however you want it centered. ;) – Sylhare Feb 28 '18 at 16:44

22 Answers 22

760

In the case of a non-fixed width div (i.e. you don't know how much space the div will occupy).

#wrapper {
  background-color: green; /* for visualization purposes */
  text-align: center;
}
#yourdiv {
  background-color: red; /* for visualization purposes */
  display: inline-block;
}
<div id="wrapper">    
    <div id="yourdiv">Your text</div>
</div>

Keep in mind that the width of #yourdiv is dynamic -> it will grow and shrink to accommodate the text inside it.

You can check browser compatibility on Caniuse

  • 6
    I've been using the "margin:0 auto" solution for a long time, but this is better. – Nahn Feb 6 '14 at 9:39
  • 1
    @UriKlar Because margin: 0 auto is easier and more semantically correct. – bjb568 Feb 9 '14 at 7:51
  • 1
    This fixed my problem when margin:0 auto would not. – Kenny Johnson Apr 9 '14 at 22:45
  • 2
    This solution makes inline-block useful! – Erlend K.H. Nov 27 '15 at 13:48
  • 4
    One drawback of this method is that text-align: center is inherited, and therefore affects the content, while margin: 0 auto doesn't. – Csati Mar 17 '17 at 16:03
561

In most browsers this will work:

div.centre {
  width: 200px;
  display: block;
  background-color: #eee;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
}
<div class="centre">Some Text</div>

In IE6 you will need to add another outer div:

div.layout {
  text-align: center;
}

div.centre {
  text-align: left;
  width: 200px;
  background-color: #eee;
  display: block;
  margin-left: auto;
  margin-right: auto;
}
<div class="layout">
  <div class="centre">Some Text</div>
</div>

  • 2
    Yes, due to layout bugs in IE before IE7, you must do this. But in IE8, a simple text-align: center is enough. :) – Eriawan Kusumawardhono Mar 6 '09 at 9:10
  • 8
    That means IE8 is still wrong, as it isn't text. – cjk Mar 6 '09 at 9:15
  • 1
    @Antony Scott: It needs to be in strict mode (has any doctype declared). – Tom Mar 6 '09 at 10:14
  • 39
    Also... only works if you know the width of the container. If the width changes, you have to update your CSS (which stinks if the content is dynamically generated) – BMiner Aug 12 '11 at 14:30
  • 1
    i'm pretty sure it would work if you didn't know the width of your content, but you'd need to setthe width to something as a div will expand to the width of it's container. – Antony Scott Aug 12 '11 at 15:19
57
margin: 0 auto;

as ck has said, min-width is not supported by all browsers

  • Note that this only works when the element also has its width property set. When you want the element's width to be dynamic (based on its contents), see the chosen answer. – Niko Bellic Mar 7 '17 at 0:45
40

The title of the question and the content is actually different, so I will post two solutions for that using Flexbox.

I guess Flexbox will replace/add to the current standard solution by the time IE8 and IE9 is completely destroyed ;)

Check the current Browser compatibility table for flexbox

Single element

.container {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
}
<div class="container">
  <img src="http://placehold.it/100x100">
</div>

Multiple elements but center only one

Default behaviour is flex-direction: row which will align all the child items in a single line. Setting it to flex-direction: column will help the lines to be stacked.

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}
.centered {
  align-self: center;
}
<div class="container">
  <p>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged.
   </p>
  <div class="centered"><img src="http://placehold.it/100x100"></div>
  <p>Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book. It
    has survived not only five centuries, but also the leap into electronic typesetting, remaining essentially unchanged. </p>
</div>

  • Yeah, Flexbox is the (not so) "modern" way of doing this :) – Tivie Aug 18 '17 at 13:02
  • Yeah. Care to edit this so that it can reach the general audience, Tivie? ;) – Manoj Kumar Sep 2 '17 at 4:00
  • 1
    This worked for me when the top two answers didn't. Thank you. – Ellen Spertus Oct 1 '17 at 20:45
  • 1
    @ManojKumar I think flexbox "fixes" a lot of the design issues and is currently supported by almost every browser. – Tivie Dec 18 '17 at 8:47
  • 1
    For some reason margin: 0 auto, didn't work in my Bourbon Neat project, but flexbox saved the day. – Halfacht Jun 28 '18 at 22:13
29

If old browsers are not an issue, use HTML5 / CSS3. If they are, apply polyfills and still use HTML5 / CSS3. I assume that your div has no margins or paddings here, but they are relatively easy to account for. The code follows.

.centered {
    position: relative;
    left: 50%;
    transform: translateX(-50%);
}

What this does is:

  1. Position the div relative to its container;
  2. Position the div's left boundary at 50% of its container width horizontally;
  3. Translate back horizontally by 50% of the div's own width.

It is easy to imagine this process to confirm that the div would be horizontally centered eventually. As a bonus, you can center vertically at no additional cost:

.centered-vertically {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

The advantage of this approach is that you don't have to do any counterintuitive stuff, such as considering your div a text of sorts, wrapping it in a (often semantically useless) additional container, or giving it a fixed width, which is not always possible.

Don't forget vendor prefixes for transform if needed.

  • An issue with the horizontal method is that the centered element will not dynamically scale past 50% of the parent's width: jsfiddle.net/ywy9w3gk – user2145184 Dec 8 '16 at 17:53
28

CSS, HTML:

div.mydiv {width: 200px; margin: 0 auto}
<div class="mydiv">
    
    I am in the middle
    
</div>

Your diagram shows a block level element also (which a div usually is), not an inline one.

Of the top of my head, min-width is supported in FF2+/Safari3+/IE7+. Can be done for IE6 using hackety CSS, or a simple bit of JS.

  • Thanks for clarifying about the "inline" terminology. I was trying to say that I didn't want it to float over any text. – cmcginty Mar 6 '09 at 10:23
27
.center {
   margin-left: auto;
   margin-right: auto;
}

Minimum width is not globally supported, but can be implemented using

.divclass {
   min-width: 200px;
}

Then you can set your div to be

<div class="center divclass">stuff in here</div>
11

You should use position: relative and text-align: center on the parent element and then display: inline-block on the child element you want to center. This is a simple CSS design pattern that will work across all major browsers. Here is an example below or check out the CodePen Example.

p {
  text-align: left;
}
.container {
  position: relative;
  display: block;
  text-align: center;
}
/* Style your object */

.object {
  padding: 10px;
  color: #ffffff;
  background-color: #556270;
}
.centerthis {
  display: inline-block;
}
<div class="container">

  <p>Aeroplanigera Mi Psychopathologia Subdistinctio Chirographum Intuor Sons Superbiloquentia Os Sors Sesquiseptimus Municipatio Archipresbyteratus O Conclusio Compedagogius An Maius Septentrionarius Plas Inproportionabilit Constantinopolis Particularisticus.</p>

  <span class="object centerthis">Something Centered</span>

  <p>Aeroplanigera Mi Psychopathologia Subdistinctio Chirographum Intuor Sons Superbiloquentia Os Sors Sesquiseptimus Municipatio Archipresbyteratus O Conclusio Compedagogius.</p>
</div>

  • text-align: center did the trick. Just needed to add that to the parent element. – magnusarinell Dec 6 '18 at 10:47
9

you can use margin: 0 auto on your css instead of margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;

9

Please use the below code and your div will be in the center.

.class-name {
    display:block;
    margin:0 auto;
}
5

After nine years I thought it was time to bring a new version. Here are my two (and now one) favourites.

Margin

Set margin to auto. You should know the direction sequence is margin: *top* *right* *bottom* *left*; or margin: *top&bottom* *left&right*

aside{
    display: block;
    width: 50px;
    height: 100px;
    background-color: green;
    float: left;
}

article{
    height: 100px;
    margin: 0 0 0 50px; /* 50px aside width */
    background-color: grey;
}

div{
  margin: 0 auto;
  display:block;
  width: 60px;
  height: 60px;
  background-color: blue;
  color: white;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
    </head>
    <body>
        <aside>
        </aside>
        <article>           
                <div>The div</div>
        </article>
    </body>
</html>

Center: Depricated, don't use this!

Use <center></center> tags as a wrap around your <div></div>.

Example:

aside{
    display:block;
    background-color:green;
    width: 50px;
    height: 100px;
    float: left;
}

center{
    display:block;
    background-color:grey;
    height: 100px;
    margin-left: 50px; /* Width of the aside */
}

div{
    display:block; 
    width: 60px; 
    height: 60px; 
    background-color:blue;
    color: white;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
    </head>
    <body>
        <aside>
        </aside>
        <article>
            <center>
                <div>The div</div>
            </center>
        </article>
    </body>
</html>

5

If you know the width of your div and it is fixed, you can use the following css:

margin-left: calc(50% - 'half-of-your-div-width');

where 'half-of-your-div-width' should be (obviously) the half of the width of your div.

3

If your <div> has position: absolute you need to use width: 100%;

#parent {
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
}

    #child {
        display: inline-block;
    }
3

.center {
  height: 20px;
  background-color: blue;
}

.center>div {
  margin: auto;
  background-color: green;
  width: 200px;
}
<div class="center">
  <div>You text</div>
</div>

JsFiddle

  • This did the trick for me, specifically helps center the whole div not just the text inside of it. – thnkwthprtls Jun 14 '16 at 14:00
2

Here I add proper answer

You can use this snippet code and customize. Here I use 2 child block.This should show center of the page. You can use one or multiple blocks.

<html>
<head>
<style>
#parent {
    width: 100%;
    border: solid 1px #aaa;
    text-align: center;
    font-size: 20px;
    letter-spacing: 35px;
    white-space: nowrap;
    line-height: 12px;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.child {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    border: solid 1px #ccc;
    display: inline-block;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>

<div class="mydiv" id="parent">


<div class="child">
Block 1
</div>
<div class="child">
Block 2
</div>

</div>
</body>
</html>
1

In your html file you write:

<div class="banner">
  Center content
</div>

your css file you write:

.banner {
display: block;
margin: auto;
width: 100px;
height: 50px;
}

works for me.

1

Usage of margin-left:auto and margin-right:auto may not work in certain situations. Here is a solution what will always work. You specify a required width and than set a left-margin to a half of the remaining width.

    <div style="width:80%; margin-left:calc(10%);">
        your_html
    </div>
1

Add this class to your css file it will work perfectly steps to do:

1) create this first

<div class="center-role-form">
  <!--your div (contrent) place here-->
</div>

2) add this to your css

.center-role-form {
    width: fit-content;
    text-align: center;
    margin: 1em auto;
}
0

The best response to this question is to use margin-auto but for using it you must know the width of your div in px or %.

CSS code:

div{
    width:30%;
    margin-left:auto;
    margin-right:auto;
}
  • Instead of margin-left:auto; and margin-right:auto;, you might want to write margin: 0 auto; – CoderPi Dec 1 '15 at 8:06
0

I use div and span tags together with css properties such as block, cross-browser inline-block and text-align center, see my simple example

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
       <title>Page Title</title>
       <style>
           .block{display:block;}
           .text-center{text-align:center;}
           .border-dashed-black{border:1px dashed black;}
           .inline-block{
                 display: -moz-inline-stack;
                 display: inline-block;
                 zoom: 1;
                 *display: inline;
            }
           .border-solid-black{border:1px solid black;}
           .text-left{text-align:left;}
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
          <div class="block text-center border-dashed-black">
              <span class="block text-center">
                  <span class="block"> 
        <!-- The Div we want to center set any width as long as it is not more than the container-->
                      <div class="inline-block text-left border-solid-black" style="width:450px !important;">
                             jjjjjk
                      </div> 
                  </span>
              </span>
          </div>
      </body>
   </html>
-3

Using jQuery:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".myElement").wrap( '<span class="myElement_container_new"></span>' ); // for IE6
    $(".myElement_container_new").css({// for IE6
        "display" : "block",
        "position" : "relative",
        "margin" : "0",
        "padding" : "0",
        "border" : "none",
        "background-color" : "transparent",
        "clear" : "both",
        "text-align" : "center"
    });
    $(".myElement").css({
        "display" : "block",
        "position" : "relative",
        "max-width" : "75%", // for example
        "margin-left" : "auto",
        "margin-right" : "auto",
        "clear" : "both",
        "text-align" : "left"
    });
});

or, if you want to center every element with class ".myElement":

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".myElement").each(function() {
        $(this).wrap( '<span class="myElement_container_new"></span>' ); // for IE6
        $(".myElement_container_new").css({// for IE6
            "display" : "block",
            "position" : "relative",
            "margin" : "0",
            "padding" : "0",
            "border" : "none",
            "background-color" : "transparent",
            "clear" : "both",
            "text-align" : "center"
        });
        $(this).css({
            "display" : "block",
            "position" : "relative",
            "max-width" : "75%",
            "margin-left" : "auto",
            "margin-right" : "auto",
            "clear" : "both",
            "text-align" : "left"
        });
    });
});
-4

you can use the position:relative; and then set the left and the top values:

.cenverDiv{
    position:relative;
    left:30%;
    top:0px;
}
  • 1
    That's not really easy though, it requires a lot of experimentation to get the values right. – RevanProdigalKnight Jul 14 '14 at 11:50
  • 1
    That's not really useful. – Luca Steeb Apr 1 '15 at 1:09

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