I want to count the number of matches there is on one single line (or all lines as there always will be only one line).

I want to count not just one match per line as in

echo "123 123 123" | grep -c -E "123" # Result: 1

Better example:

echo "1 1 2 2 2 5" | grep -c -E '([^ ])( \1){1}' # Result: 1, expected: 2 or 3
  • is the data always space-separated? – Mike Pennington May 30 '11 at 22:44
  • There will always only be "one data" because maybe i want to match 123 123 3 (or 2) times in 123 123 123 123 – Tyilo May 30 '11 at 22:55
  • 1
    +1 for the question, -1 for the bizarre regex example – Mike Pennington May 30 '11 at 23:03
up vote 49 down vote accepted

You could use grep -o then pipe through wc -l:

$ echo "123 123 123" | grep -o 123 | wc -l
3
  • 1
    My version of grep doesn't know what -o is :( – manojlds May 30 '11 at 22:52
  • 12
    You need to ask Father Christmas for a new grep this year. :) – Simon Whitaker May 30 '11 at 22:54
  • @manojlds, do you have egrep? Same thing would work w/ egrep – Mike Pennington May 30 '11 at 22:54
  • @Mike Pennington - thanks, egrep says the same. I am on Windows now, so i think it's expected. – manojlds May 30 '11 at 22:57
  • @manojlds, get cygwin, you won't regret it – Mike Pennington May 30 '11 at 22:58

Maybe you should convert spaces to newlines first:

$ echo "1 1 2 2 2 5" | tr ' ' $'\n' | grep -c 2
3

Maybe below:

echo "123 123 123" | sed "s/123 /123\n/g" | wc -l

( maybe ugly, but my bash fu is not that great )

  • I get this ouput: 1 – Tyilo May 30 '11 at 22:54
  • @Tyilo - what did you try? I am getting 3 for the above input – manojlds May 30 '11 at 22:58
  • Copy and pasted your code, but i remember now that my sed doesn't support \n – Tyilo May 30 '11 at 22:59

Why not use awk? You could use awk '{print gsub(your_regex,"&")}' to print the number of matches on each line, or awk '{c+=gsub(your_regex,"&")}END{print c}' to print the total number of matches. Note that relative speed may vary depending on which awk implementation is used, and which input is given.

  • Another way by gawk is gawk -v FPAT=your_regex '{print NF}' or gawk -v FPAT=your_regex '{c+=NF}END{print c}', respectively. – jarno Sep 3 '15 at 17:57

This might work for you:

sed -n -e ':a' -e 's/123//p' -e 'ta' file | sed -n '$='

GNU sed could be written:

sed -n ':;s/123//p;t' file | sed -n '$='
  • The first script does't work by GNU sed 4.2.2: "sed: can't find label for jump to a'". It seems to work better, if you replace :ta` by :a. The scripts seems to require newline in the end of intput. Besides, the script outputs nothing, if no matches are found. Test: printf 123 | sed -n ':;s/123//p;t' | sed -n '$=' outputs nothing. – jarno Sep 4 '15 at 18:09

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