21

Scott Meyers writes in Effective Modern C++, Item 30 page 210, that there's

no need to define integral static const data members in classes; declarations alone suffice,

then the sample code is

class Widget {
  public:
    static const std::size_t MinVals = 28; // MinVals' declaration;
    ...
};
...                                        // no defn. for MinVals
std::vector<int> widgetData;
widgetData.reserve(Widget::MinVals);       // use of MinVals

I was convinced that static const std::size_t MinVals = 28; is declaration and also a definition, as it is giving a value to MinVals, but the comments seems to claim that's only a declaration; the second comment actually claims there's no definition. The text after the code, indeed reads

MinVals lacks a definition.

Which confirms that static const std::size_t MinVals = 28; is not a definition, so I'm a bit confused.

cppreference doesn't help me much (my bold-italic):

If a static data member of integral or enumeration type is declared const (and not volatile), it can be initialized with an initializer in which every expression is a constant expression, right inside the class definition:

struct X
{
    const static int n = 1;
    const static int m{2}; // since C++11
    const static int k;
};
const int X::k = 3;

but first two lines in the class look definitions to me.

The same goes for a following example on cppreference:

struct X {
    static const int n = 1;
    static constexpr int m = 4;
};
const int *p = &X::n, *q = &X::m; // X::n and X::m are odr-used
const int X::n;             // … so a definition is necessary
constexpr int X::m;         // … (except for X::m in C++17)

where I'd have said static const int n = 1; is a definition, but it is not, based on the second to last comment.

  • 5
    Great background, but I'm unsure exactly what your question is. – AndyG May 17 at 18:22
  • From n4835.pdf [class.static.data] (2) The declaration of a non-inline static data member in its class definition is not a definition [...]. But (3) is directly for integral types with an initializer and this paragraph does not help if this is a declaration or definition. – Werner Henze May 17 at 18:40
  • Thinking at it again, @AndyG, I don't there's something else to explicitly state to make my question clear. The title begins as Confusion about. That's it. I'm confused about that and I asking for help. Confusion about [...]. Can you help me understand this? – Enrico Maria De Angelis May 17 at 19:04
  • C++17 introduces inline static, and it's awesome. – Matthieu M. May 18 at 7:42
  • recent, related – Cee McSharpface May 18 at 10:33
17

no need to define integral static const data members in classes; declarations alone suffice,

Declarations alone suffice only if that object is not ODR-used, that is, if a data member is not used in a context that would require its address to exist (like binding to a reference or applying operator &). The presence of an initializer does not equal a definition.

In the example from the book, it's clear that MinVals is not ODR-used, i.e., the compiler can use its value directly, without having to create an object in memory, and so the statement:

widgetData.reserve(Widget::MinVals);

becomes:

widgetData.reserve(28);

If, however, in any other place, MinVals were ODR-used, that would make the program ill-formed.

All other examples from cppreference clearly indicate when a value is ODR-used and a definition is required, and when not:

struct X
{
    const static int n = 1;
    const static int m{2}; // since C++11
    const static int k;
};
const int X::k = 3;

n and m are declarations with initializers. An attempt to obtain the address of either n or m should fail.

struct X {
    static const int n = 1;
    static constexpr int m = 4;
};
const int *p = &X::n, *q = &X::m;
const int X::n;
constexpr int X::m;

Expressions &X::n and &X::m count as ODR-use of n and m, respectively (that is, an address is requested). For a constexpr static data members, a definition was required prior to C++17. From C++17, static constexpr data members are implicitly inline, which means, no out-of-class definition is needed, as they are definitions themselves.

| improve this answer | |
  • The critical phrase here is initializing declaration. – Davis Herring May 17 at 19:17
  • Answer accepted, but I have two doubts about the very first paragraph in your answer. You write Declarations alone suffice only if [...]; do you refer specifically to declarations of _ integral static const data members_, or to declarations in general? You finish the paragraph with The presence of an initializer does not equal a definition, which makes it look like a consequence of what precedes it, but I don't see the connection. Maybe you can clarify that first paragraph? – Enrico Maria De Angelis May 18 at 17:38
  • That depends on what kind of declarations you ask about. You can feel free not to define a static data member (either const or not), and only declare it as long as you don't ODR-use it. You can feel free not to define a function, as long as it's not called. You can feel free not to define a class, as long as you do not use it in a context that requires its full definition to exist. You are allowed to put an initializer to integral const static data members, but it doesn't make it a definition. It's valid, and allows the compiler to perform optimization, as long as that entity is not ODR-used. – Piotr Skotnicki May 18 at 22:33
  • 1
    Don't focus only on the syntax. static const int i = 0; means something different whether it's in a class scope or in the global scope. It's semantics what eventually matters, and it results from both syntax and context. – Piotr Skotnicki May 19 at 5:45
  • 1
    And the standard makes it explicitly a non-definition in [basic.def]/p2.3, unless you put also the inline keyword. – Piotr Skotnicki May 19 at 10:33
3

Looking at this Draft Standard, it appears that your example falls into a grey area. While there is no explicit mention of lines such as:

    static const std::size_t MinVals = 28;

There is an example given which is very similar:

6.1 Declarations and definitions
...
2 A declaration is a definition unless
...
2.3 — it declares a non-inline static data member in a class definition
...
Example: All but one of the following are definitions:

int a; // defines a
extern const int c = 1; // defines c
...

The second example is close to your code, but with a significant difference in having the extern qualifier. Also, note that the above states that a declaration is (by default) also a definition unless one of the listed conditions applies; I would say (though I'm no Language-Lawyer) that none of those conditions are met exactly in your case, so your declaration is also a definition.

NOTE: The linked document is only a draft standard; make sure to read the 'disclaimer' given at the foot of its first page!

| improve this answer | |
  • But the /2.3 condition does apply here! – Davis Herring May 17 at 19:13
  • @DavisHerring That's my 'grey area'. I think it applied literally but the term 'inline' can be ambiguous: i.e. either an explicit inline qualifier or 'in body' (code placed inside the class definition). I'm probably only adding to the confusion, though. – Adrian Mole May 17 at 19:15
  • @AdrianMole, since inline in 2.3 is not code-formatted, I agree with you that non-inline means not written inside the class definition, which would mean that 2.3 doesn't apply to my (well, Scott Meyers' book's) case. – Enrico Maria De Angelis May 17 at 19:18
  • @EnricoMariaDeAngelis I would agree but, as I said, I'm no Language-Lawyer. This conversation could easily become iterative, if not recursive. Further, if the first two examples are definitions, then I really can't see why yours is not. – Adrian Mole May 17 at 19:20
  • @EnricoMariaDeAngelis: The standard does not use “inline” to mean “defined (or initialized) in a class”. It also doesn’t use code font to refer to properties (like inline or constexpr) that can be applied/implied other than by a keyword. – Davis Herring May 17 at 19:50
0

From The Standard Chapter "12.2.3.2 Static data members":

The member shall still be defined in a namespace scope if it is odr-used in the program and the namespace scope definition shall not contain an initializer.

By using it, it shall be defined.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.