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I have the image and its mask like this:

mask

original_im

How can I use the mask to identify the rectangle bounding box around the object? So the final result should be this (with the background removed): enter image description here

import urllib
from io import BytesIO

url_mask = "https://i.stack.imgur.com/rIyJ6.png"
f = urllib.request.urlopen(url_mask)
mask = Image.open(BytesIO(f.read()))

url_im = "https://i.stack.imgur.com/msm7L.jpg"
f2 = urllib.request.urlopen(url_im)
img = Image.open(BytesIO(f2.read()))
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    Hi, please read the minimal reproducible example to create a question that will be answered by the community. – Andy K May 19 '20 at 18:22
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    cv2.boundingRect function with the list of white pixels in the mask – Micka May 19 '20 at 18:24
  • @Micka can you elaborate more? – Ha An Tran May 19 '20 at 18:33
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There's a fast way to do this (cv2.boundingRect()), but here's a way to think about how to do it from scratch.

Let's call your image im and the mask im, which I assume are NumPy arrays (or similar). Your goal is to find row indices [row_low, row_high] and column indices [col_low, col_high] such that the array im[row_low:row_high, col_low:col_high] is the sub-image that you're looking for.

If mask is an array of pixel values (probably 0's (black) and 255's (white)), start by converting it to a two-dimensional boolean array where an entry being True means you have a white pixel at that part of the mask (this isn't strictly necessary but it helps to see what's going on).

>>> mask.shape
(758, 734, 3)                    # The original mask, with RGB layers.
>>> mask2d = mask.mean(axis=2)   # Get a single black-and-white mask.
>>> mask2d.shape
(758, 734)
>>> bmask = (mask2d == 255)      # Or maybe (mask >= 200) to be safe.

Now for each row and column, you can use np.max() to determine if that row or column has True in it or not (meaning there is a white pixel in that row or column of the mask). You can do this for all of the columns at once by specifying axis in np.max(): axis=0 will check if there's a True in the column, and axis=1 will check if there's a True in the row.

>>> import numpy as np

>>> bmask.shape           # Here's the boolean mask.
(758, 734)                # It has 758 rows and 734 columns.
>>> rows_with_white = np.max(bmask, axis=1)
>>> cols_with_white = np.max(bmask, axis=0)

# Check shapes.
>>> rows_with_white.shape
(758,)
>>> cols_with_white.shape
(734,)

The location of the first and last True in rows_with_white give you row_low and row_high, respectively, and similarly for cols_with_white. We can get them both with np.argmax(), which finds the first location of the largest value (which, for boolean arrays, is True). To get the location of the last True, we can simply reverse the array and repeat the process. These are negative indices, which indicate that we're counting backward from the end.

>>> row_low = np.argmax(rows_with_white)
>>> row_high = -np.argmax(rows_with_white[::-1])
>>> col_low = np.argmax(cols_with_white)
>>> col_high = -np.argmax(cols_with_white[::-1])

>>> print((row_low, row_high), (col_low, col_high))
(85, -85) (174, -164)

Now that you have the indices, you can simply slice the original image to get the cropped one.

>>> im_cropped = im[row_low:row_high, col_low:col_high]

And here's the whole thing put together, which assumes you already have mask and im defined.

>>> import numpy as np

>>> bmask = (mask.mean(axis=2) == 255)
>>> rows_with_white = np.max(bmask, axis=1)
>>> cols_with_white = np.max(bmask, axis=0)

>>> row_low = np.argmax(rows_with_white)
>>> row_high = -np.argmax(rows_with_white[::-1])
>>> col_low = np.argmax(cols_with_white)
>>> col_high = -np.argmax(cols_with_white[::-1])

>>> im_cropped = im[row_low:row_high, col_low:col_high]
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  • Hi, I followed your code but the values of row_low and row_high are over my image. Also, rows_with_white and cols_with_white have shape (758,3) and (734.3) – Ha An Tran May 19 '20 at 19:05
  • Try flattening your mask into a two-dimensional array first, mask = mask.mean(axis=2). This smashes the RGB layers together into a single black-and-white layer, which is what you want anyway. – vanPelt2 May 19 '20 at 19:12
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    In case row_high or col_high =0, you need to set them to -row_low or -col_low – Ha An Tran May 19 '20 at 19:58
  • ^yes. Another way to handle this problem a little more robustly is to do row_high = n_rows - np.argmax(rows_with_white[::-1]) where n_rows = len(rows_with_white). This sets it to the correct positive index instead of using negative indices. – vanPelt2 May 19 '20 at 21:16
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If you are not using cv2, then you could look trough all pixels and find xmin, xmax, ymin ymax that equal 1. Since black is usually represented as 0 and white as 1.

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  • Im using cv2 or some common image processing libraries – Ha An Tran May 19 '20 at 18:44

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