20

I want to stream the lines contained in files but MOVING each file to another folder once it has been processed.

The current process is like this:

Explanation:

  1. I create a Stream of Files
  2. I create a BufferedReader for each one of them
  3. I flatMap to the lines Stream of the BufferedReader
  4. I print each line.

Code (omitted exceptions for simplicity):

(1)    Stream.generate(localFileProvider::getNextFile)
(2)       .map(file -> new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file))))
(3)       .flatMap(BufferedReader::lines)
(4)       .map(System.out::println)
          .MOVE_EACH_FILE_FROM_INPUT_FOLDER_TO_SOME_OTHER_FOLDER;

Would it be possible to move each file once it has been completely read and continue processing the other files in the stream?

3
  • interesting question. Though I am afraid you loose all information about your file once you mapped it. It's like having a stream of water where you map every drop of water to soda (by adding CO2) then you map every drop of soda to coke by adding syrup, then finally you System.our.println it in a glass - but once you drank the glass of coke you want to get the water back.. Instead of mapping couldn't you process it sequentially in a loop? even when it is less sexy. – GameDroids May 20 '20 at 13:23
  • Can you use .forEach for closing input stream and moving file ? – fuat May 20 '20 at 13:23
  • elements in stream,we just process one by one,we can not remove them,so though remove element in stream(impossible) to remove line from initial file is also impossible. – TongChen May 20 '20 at 13:38
15

You can chain a close action to a stream, which will be executed automatically in case of flatMap:

Stream.generate(localFileProvider::getNextFile).takeWhile(Objects::nonNull)

    .flatMap(file -> {
        try {
            Path p = file.toPath();
            return Files.lines(p, Charset.defaultCharset()).onClose(() -> {
                try { // move path/x/y/z to path/x/y/z.moved
                    Files.move(p, p.resolveSibling(p.getFileName()+".moved"));
                } catch(IOException ex) { throw new UncheckedIOException(ex); }
            });
        } catch(IOException ex) { throw new UncheckedIOException(ex); }
    })

    .forEach(System.out::println);

It’s important that the documentation of onClose states:

Close handlers are run when the close() method is called on the stream, and are executed in the order they were added.

So the moving close handler is executed after the already existing close handler that will close the file handle used for reading the lines.

I used Charset.defaultCharset() to mimic the behavior of the nested constructors new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file))) of your question’s code, but generally, you should use a fixed charset, like the Files.lines’s default UTF-8 whenever possible.

6
  • I was thinking the same, but was wondring if we contractually can be sure that lines stream is closed after the println for the last line of the file has been called, or not. And I'm really not sure about that. (The issue being that you can detect that the file is read completely, but not that its last line is processed, or can you ?). The question is not really clear if this is an issue or not. Plus what if println throws, is the file moved ? I think a general solution should have to tie the Stream/Reader status to that of its last line... – GPI May 20 '20 at 14:12
  • 1
    @GPI the question says, “move each file once it has been completely read” which does not mandate that the processing has been finished by that time. I interpret it as “move once we can be sure that it doesn’t interfere with the reading”, which is a typical task. Though here, where we are in control of the opening, we could also just move the file before opening at the new location… – Holger May 20 '20 at 14:19
  • Fair enough. And what if println (or really, the terminal operation) fails "in the middle" (let's pretend that everything is serial) of a file ? Isn't the stream closed and the file moved nonetheless ? – GPI May 20 '20 at 14:33
  • 2
    @GPI well, yes. The question doesn’t state whether this matches the intention or not. If not, a loop solution would be much simpler (Even simpler than it is already, considering the noise of the required exception handling). – Holger May 20 '20 at 14:47
  • 1
    @Solubris I can’t say for sure anymore, there are two possibilities. Either, the strategy was just to put the entire lambda body into the try block for simplicity or the code initially contained the expression file.toPath() repeatedly in the return statement and I used the “extract to variable” option of my IDE. But since, as you said correctly, this line can’t throw an IOException, it doesn’t matter anyway. – Holger May 27 '20 at 7:52
6

I would just create two methods:

public void processFile(File f);
public void moveFile(File f, File dstFolder);

then in lambda:

Stream.generate(localFileProvider::getNextFile).forEach(file->
   {
     processFile(file);
     moveFile(file, dstFolder)
   }
}
5

Actually it will be very easy if you can divide the logic into different method

 public Path readFile(File eachFile) {
   BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file)));

  //try-with-resources
 try (Stream<String> lines = reader.lines()) {
lines.forEach(System.out::println);

 } 
catch (IOException e) {
   e.printStackTrace();
 }
   return eachFile.toPath();
  }

And then call this method for each file

(1)    Stream.generate(localFileProvider::getNextFile)
(2)          .map(this::readFile) //process each file
(3)          .forEach(path->Files.move(path,Paths.get("new path"))); //then move each file
2

Can do something like this:

    files
        .map( file -> {
            getBufferedReader( file ).lines()
                .forEach( System.out::println );
            return file;
        } )
        .forEach( this::moveFile );

Update for checked exceptions and Reader.close:

Admittedly, this doesn't run close() in a finally block, so that is a downside. The point of this update is mainly to illustrate a way of dealing with checked exceptions in Java 8 streams.

Let's say you have the following utility code available:

private interface ThrowingFunction<I, O>
{
    O apply( I input ) throws Exception;
}

private <I, O> Function<I, O> unchecked( ThrowingFunction<I, O> checked )
{
    return i -> {
        try {
            return checked.apply( i );
        }
        catch ( Exception e ) {
            throw new RuntimeException();
        }
    };
}

private interface ThrowingConsumer<T>
{
    void consume( T input ) throws Exception;
}

private <T> Consumer<T> unchecked( ThrowingConsumer<T> checked )
{
    return t -> {
        try {
            checked.consume( t );
        }
        catch ( Exception e ) {
            throw new RuntimeException();
        }
    };
}

private BufferedReader getBufferedReader( File file ) throws FileNotFoundException
{
    return new BufferedReader( new InputStreamReader( new FileInputStream( file )));
}

Writing the actual code then becomes:

    files
        .map( file -> {
            Stream.of( file )
                .map( unchecked( this::getBufferedReader ))
                .map( reader -> {
                    reader.lines().forEach( System.out::println );
                    return reader;
                } )
                .forEach( unchecked( Reader::close ));
            return file;
        } )
        .forEach( this::moveFile );

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