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So I was just modifying something I felt that fit my style a bit better from an answer to an algorithm from another person. One of the things I decided to change, and at the time not confused at all about, is changing all the places where they placed a // with an int() surrounding the whole calculation, giving me the same result. Now, when I finished changing all these minor details, I thought the test cases would pass...I was wrong. The functions below are supposed to do the same thing, which is returning all the given fractions (in a format of...for example[[1, 2], [1, 3], [1, 4]]) with the same common denominator, if the given example was to go through the function it should return [[6, 12], [4, 12], [3, 12]].

Using int() for the return (last bit):

from math import gcd
from functools import reduce

def convertFracts(lst):
    if not lst: return []
    lcm = lambda a, b: int(a*b / gcd(a, b))
    denom_list = (i[1] for i in lst)
    lcm_num = reduce(lcm, denom_list)
    return [[int(i[0]*lcm_num / i[1]), lcm_num] for i in lst]

Using // for the return (last bit):

from math import gcd
from functools import reduce

def convertFracts(lst):
    if not lst: return []
    lcm = lambda a, b: int(a*b / gcd(a, b))
    denom_list = (i[1] for i in lst)
    lcm_num = reduce(lcm, denom_list)
    return [[i[0]*lcm_num // i[1], lcm_num] for i in lst]

The test case that failed when using int() but passed when using // which contained really large fractions:

[[27115, 5262], [87546, 11111111], [43216, 255689]]

This is how it came out when using the int():

[[77033412951888080, 14949283383840498], [117787497858828, 14949283383840498], [2526695441399712, 14949283383840498]]

But it wasn't equal to the correct answer which was:

[[77033412951888085, 14949283383840498], [117787497858828, 14949283383840498], [2526695441399712, 14949283383840498]]

When using // instead of int() for the return bit, it passed...my question is, why did int() fail at what // didn't, is it less accurate with bigger numbers?

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  • Could it be that the result of the float division loses accuracy?
    – Peter
    May 21, 2020 at 17:13

2 Answers 2

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int() is not the problem. The problem is that when dividing with /, the result is a float (which is why you need int()). A float uses a fixed number of bits to represent the value, so if there are too many bits, they get cut off of the least significand end of the number. Additionally, rounding happens when the bits are cut off. In hexadecimal it is easier to see that bits are getting lost. For example:

randomStuff = 0x979182375823975089237584250DEADBEEF
x = randomStuff * 1337
print(hex(int(x / 1337)))
print(hex(x // 1337))

This prints:

0x97918237582398000000000000000000000
0x979182375823975089237584250deadbeef

By going through float, a lot of bits got cut off.

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I may be able to help. This site suggests the following regarding floor/integer division (//) "The resultant value is a whole integer, though the result's type is not necessarily int." There is a long integer type for higher precision with large numbers. I personally have not needed to use it, but since your error case has to do with large values it may be related.

It might be interesting/valuable to test the types of the values in the previous version of the algorithm that used floor division, just to see if they ever become longs. I swear I read somewhere that Python had started handling the int/long conversion automatically, but explicitly converting via int() might cause issues.

EDIT: I was mistaken, and assumed that the link I had provided originally was relevant to your question. It was actually from the Python 2.4 docs, and the updated language doc section for 3.8 makes no mention of longs. If you are using Python 3.x as you've tagged, I'm afraid this answer probably isn't helpful.

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