8

What's stopping me from doing this:

<head>    
<style type="text/css">
red{
    display:block;
    background:red;
    height:20px;
    width:20px;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>

<red></red>

Will this work? What's going to stop it?

From what I understand, the browser will find the and match the css styles based on the selector rules, and so long as you specify ALL the required rules (I'm sure there're more), what's stopping me from seeing a small red box on screen?

14
  • In HTML5 this is ok. There you can invent your own tags. In Xhtml and HTML < 5 it's just invalid markup. However you will have to close the body-tag and wrap the whole markup in html-tags.
    – Fidi
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:18
  • @faileN - Yeah, I know about the body and the html tags, just got lazy in putting down everything... So long as the point got across... :-)
    – Abhishek
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:20
  • 4
    @faileN — please point me to the part of the HTML 5 specification that says you can make up new elements. I'm pretty sure it doesn't exist.
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:23
  • Response to edit: Have you tried it in GoogleBot? Have you tried it in JAWS? Have you tried it in Internet Explorer 7? Or 8?
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:31
  • 1
    @GeorgeStocker why did you close an older question with a newer one?
    – tereško
    Dec 4 '13 at 8:13
8

It's possible but won't work across all browser out of the box, though they will have some degree of support for it. If you really want to create your own subset of HTML tags you should look into creating your own DTD for it.

A DTD is a document type definition which is basically a file the browsers reads to see what tags are available in your specific subset of the html markup language.

This article describes how to create your own DTD, however it's not recommended to do so, because it won't be valid HTML.

2
  • 3
    Having a DTD for which a <red> element is valid will not make that element HTML or improve browser support for it.
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:20
  • No but it will prevent your page failing validation for the new HTML dialect defined in your DTD. And if your browser implements the specs right it should also allow css to style these new elements, but as we all know that isn't always the case.
    – ChrisR
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:31
3

It should work, however, this will cause your HTML to not validate unless you also create a custom DTD.

9
  • pardon my ignorance here, but DTD?
    – Abhishek
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:17
  • DocType Declaration. You're telling the browser what kind of document your file is & linking it to a schema so it know's the 'rules' of what is acceptable (valid) and what isn't.
    – snowBlind
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:19
  • A DTD isn't a schema, and browsers don't care about DTDs, in practise only validators do.
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:20
  • I knew when I said schema it didn't sound quite right.. The browser may not care, but that is still the purpose of declaring a doc type.
    – snowBlind
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:22
  • Wait wait... If the browser doesn't care, it'll still adhere to the render rules defined by the css, and in all practicality, the end user will not be able to tell the difference? Its only the 'standard validators' which will cough up this thing?
    – Abhishek
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:23
2

Is it possible to make up html tags?

You can join the working group and propose new elements.

Will this work?

For some definition of 'work' that is Internet Explorer, screen reader, search engine, etc hostile.

It won't be HTML though.

HTML has a wide variety of useful semantic elements (as well as some non-semantic ones) which can be extended via the class attribute (and possibly (I haven't looked too closely) role in the (draft) HTML 5 spec). Stick to those.

8
  • Lol, don't get me wrong mate, I don't plan to wander into the woods just because the table isn't exactly 11"... I'm being curious about this, because there're certain element structures (similar to <header> and <footer> that I use repeatedly, and I find it rather cumbersome to repeat the <div class="floater"> again and again...
    – Abhishek
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:25
  • 1
    Use templates / macros / etc to deal with things you find cumbersome. Don't try to redesign HTML on your own.
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:28
  • @Quentin - While I agree with you in that there is a need for a generalized standard, there is space for custom tags which are applicable only to certain groups of people... Consider this, I use a lot of floating boxes with the screen dimming in the back, to show more information about certain things... Like larger versions of thumbnails... Doing this requires me to tediously declare a <div class="floater"> repeatedly... HTML5 solved something very similar with the <footer> and <header> tags, common properties apply... I'm just looking for the same, but more 'customized' to me... :-)
    – Abhishek
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:34
  • You are delivering content to the WWW. You need to follow the rules of the WWW. You can do whatever you like in private (including using templates, macros, etc), but if you start putting out non-standard stuff in public it is going to trip you up sooner or later (especially when people hit it with Internet Explorer).
    – Quentin
    Jun 1 '11 at 6:36
  • 1
    @Quentin - Not role in HTML5. In contrast to XHTML2, the role attribute in HTML5 is limited to WAI-ARIA roles, so only a short, fixed set of values are permitted. Extensibility points for HTML5 are described here: w3.org/TR/html5/infrastructure.html#extensibility
    – Alohci
    Jun 1 '11 at 8:13
1

Although the red-element is displayed when providing a css rule for it, it remains an alien in your document. For example, attributes like id, class, or style won't be recognized by your browser as usual. As a consequence, you cannot get the element by id in scripts, and you cannot style the element through a class selector in CSS. However, the XmlDom methods, like getElementsByTagName, work. Be aware of this when introducing red elements.

1
  • Ofcourse, this is not a production intended approach, it was something I stumbled upon and became curious. But yes, I've learned enough to be cautious when attempting to 'play W3C' with the HTML standards...
    – Abhishek
    Jul 22 '11 at 9:10
0

I can suggest one PHP trick using substitutions.

<?
  function red_rpl($buffer)
  {
    $buffer = str_replace('<red>', '<div class="red">', $buffer);
    $buffer = str_replace('</red>', '</div>', $buffer);
  return $buffer;
  }
  ob_start('red_rpl');
?>

<style>
  .red {
    display:block;
    background:red;
    height:20px;
    width:20px;
  }
</style>

<red></red>

There won’t be any new tag in DOM, of course, but your source file will look quite more pretty :)

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