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Can someone help me to get sum of hours(for which System.state is active) in given json. It could be a big json with many field entries.

{
    "value": [{
            "fields": {

                "System.State": {
                    "newValue": "Active"
                },
                "System.CreatedDate": {
                    "newValue": "2020-03-25T13:37:34.423Z"
                }
            }
        },
        {
            "System.CreatedDate": {
                "oldValue": "2020-03-25T14:07:48Z",
                "newValue": "2020-03-25T14:11:52.797Z"
            },
            "System.State": {
                "oldValue": "Active",
                "newValue": "Closed"
            }
        },
        {
            "System.CreatedDate": {
                "oldValue": "2020-03-25T14:11:52.797Z",
                "newValue": "2020-03-26T14:11:52.797Z"
            },
            "System.State": {
                "oldValue": "Closed",
                "newValue": "Active"
            }
        },
        {
            "System.CreatedDate": {
                "oldValue": "2020-03-26T14:11:52.797Z",
                "newValue": "2020-03-27T14:11:52.797Z"
            },
            "System.State": {
                "oldValue": "Active",
                "newValue": "Closed"
            }
        }
    ]

}

Can someone help me to get sum of hours(for which System.state is active) in given json.

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  • What have you tried so far, please share your code – Pavel Anikhouski May 23 at 11:33
  • Do you know how to deserialize jsons to get certain fields? – Bandook May 23 at 11:37
  • I tried writing linq queries but didn't succeed , basically i am new to c# and linq, just today is the first day – nhupesh May 23 at 12:27
0

You can use the LET keyword for calculating time span and even for applying where condition.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/keywords/let-clause

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0

The first item in that json does not have a "closed" DateTime. It shows when the system became active- so solution shown below ignores that first entry.

This is a hacky solution I believe. Install the third-party library Newtonsoft.Json and import the following -

using Newtonsoft.Json;
using Newtonsoft.Json.Linq;

Create the following classes -

public class SystemValue
{
    [JsonProperty("System.CreatedDate")]
    public SystemCreatedDate createdDate { get; set; }
}

public class SystemCreatedDate
{
    [JsonProperty("oldValue")]
    public DateTime oldValue { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("newValue")]
    public DateTime newValue { get; set; }
}

Now comes the tricky part -

double totalTimeinSeconds = 0; // total time the system has been active.
dynamic rawData = JObject.Parse(json);
foreach (var raw in rawData.value)
{
    if (raw.fields != null) // ignoring entry that has the fields property
        continue;
    else
        {
            SystemValue data = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<SystemValue>(raw.ToString());
            // taking the absolute value of the timespan just for safety 
            // even though the newValue should always be greater than oldValue
            // performing Math.Abs is totally upto you
            double seconds = Math.Abs((data.createdDate.newValue - data.createdDate.oldValue).TotalSeconds);
            totalTimeinSeconds += seconds;
        }
}

With the example JSON you have provided, I get the total time active = 173044.79700000002 seconds. PS - remember I have discarded the first entry that does not contain the value for when the system was closed.

Not sure if this is what you expected. Hopefully, it would give you enough idea on how to play around with the structure of your JSON file.

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