0

I'm trying to parse a FEN using sscanf in C. I have the following code:

int main() {
  char side, pos[128], castle[4], enpas[2];
  int halfMove, fullMove;
  const char fen[] = "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1";
  const int res = sscanf(fen, "%s %c %s %s %d %d", pos, &side, castle, enpas, &halfMove, &fullMove);
  printf("%d\n", res);
  printf("%s %c %s %s %d %d\n", pos, side, castle, enpas, halfMove, fullMove);
  return 0;
}

When I run this code I get the following expected result:

6
rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1

However when I change the FEN string from a char array to a char pointer like so

const char *fen = "rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1";

I get the following result:

6
 w KQkq - 0 1

as if the first part of the string is ignored. Why is this happening? I'm using GCC 10.1.0.

2

The problem is that you are missing the point that C-strings are null-terminated.

Your declarations

char side, pos[128], castle[4], enpas[2];

does not leave space for '\0' to be appended at the end of those strings after reading them from the FEN.

As a result, it is undefined behaviour.

This will solve the problem:

char side, pos[129], castle[5], enpas[3];
| improve this answer | |
0

castle[4] isn't enough to store the string "KQkq", there is no space for \0, this triggers undefined behavior when sscanf() writes \0 after the end of the array. setting castle's length to at least 5 should fix the error.

| improve this answer | |
0

The problem is allocating castle[4] with only 4 chars.
And then filling it with "KQkq", a 4 chars string.
It seems wide enough, but as you can read here at the conversion specifier "s":

Always stores a null character in addition to the characters matched (so the
argument array must have room for at least width+1 characters)
https://en.cppreference.com/w/c/io/fscanf

| improve this answer | |
0

Probably castle will overwrite pos(stack is bottom to top) so, Try this castle[4] to castle[5] extra one for NULL and enpass[2] to enpass

See this:

#include<stdio.h>

int main() 
{
  char side, pos[128], castle[5], enpas;
  int halfMove, fullMove;

  const char *fen  = "rnbqkbnrpppppppp8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1";
  const int   res  = sscanf(fen, "%s %c %s %c %d %d", pos, &side, castle, &enpas, &halfMove, &fullMove);

  printf("%d\n", res);
  printf("%s %c %s %c %d %d\n", pos, side, castle, enpas, halfMove, fullMove);

  return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    The direction of stack allocation does not regulate how the compiler lays out objects within a stack frame. – Eric Postpischil May 23 at 12:34

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